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BIOS & ABSTRACTS

 


Mandi Arlain

Documenting Racialized and Indigenous Contributions: The Criminal Justice Firsts Project

ryerson.ca/criminaljusticefirsts

Abstract: We discuss the creation of the CJFP. It is a website that documents Indigenous and racialized individuals who were among the first to enter the professions of policing, courts, and corrections. The under-representation of these groups as criminal justice officials is a manifestation of systemic racism. As a teaching and research tool, the CJFP brings together information from various sources to highlight the contributions of and challenges faced by these criminal justice trailblazers.

Bio: Mandissa Arlain is a librarian who works as a library technician at the Ryerson University Library. She's worked in libraries academia since 2001 and in libraries since 1996. Her lived experiences in those spaces have informed her interest and participation in issues of equity, diversity, inclusion and recognition. She is also very interested in the relationships and energies these dynamics create and foster, and how those impact the lives of African/Caribbean women.


Reg Beatty

Visualizing the Unmarked

beta.1890s.ca

Abstract: This presentation examines how designing the media ecology of the Yellow Nineties 2.0 has evolved as we migrate to a new platform and reassess our practices. This ecology sustains the passage of material artifacts into digital objects through tools that facilitate transformation, description, and presentation—scans, code, taxonomies, metadata, storage, and display. 

Bio: Reg Beatty is a bookbinder and book artist who has maintained a studio in Toronto since 1992 and teaches book design at York University and Sheridan College. As project manager and in-house designer at Ryerson’s Centre for Digital Humanities, he helped create the new interface and content management system for Yellow Nineties 2.0. He received an MA in communications and culture at Ryerson/York, where his major project investigated the algorithmic book.


Nadine Boulay

Launching Lesbian and Gay Liberation in Canada

lglc.ca

Bio: Nadine is a PhD Candidate in the Department of Gender, Sexuality, & Women’s Studies at Simon Fraser University. Her dissertation research uses oral history interviewing to document histories of LGBTQ activism in rural B.C. from the 1970s to present day. She has worked on the LGLC project since 2015, researching supplementary materials to add to the prosopography.


Jason Boyd

Queering DH and Life Writing with the Texting Wilde Project

Abstract: Although DH is often seen as a method for arriving at clarity and certainty, digital methodologies can also be used to foreground ambiguity and contradiction in historical texts, which might be seen as one objective of a Queer DH. A number of examples of how the Texting Wilde Project is using DH methodologies to queer the truth claims of Life Writing will be discussed.

Bio: Jason Boyd is an Associate Professor in the Department of English and Co-Director of the CDH at Ryerson. He researches digital lives and digital storytelling.

Boyd co-authored “Toward a Queer Digital Humanities” (with Bonnie Ruberg and James Howe) for Bodies of Information: Intersectional Feminism and Digital Humanities


Susan Brown (Keynote)

Provisionally Categorical: Feminist Literary History and Digital Humanities

Bio: Susan Brown is a Professor of English at the University of Guelph, where she holds a Canada Research Chair in Collaborative Digital Scholarship, and a Visiting Professor in English and Humanities Computing at the University of Alberta. She directs and co-edits the pioneering Orlando: Women’s Writing in the British Isles from the Beginnings to the Present (ualberta.ca/orlando), an ongoing experiment in digital literary history, published online by Cambridge University Press (2006- ). She leads the development of the Canadian Writing Research Collaboratory (cwrc.ca), an online repository and research environment for literary studies in Canada, and the Linked Infrastructure for Networked Cultural Scholarship (LINCS), which leverages the semantic web to systematically link data in ways that will mobilize Canadian research and heritage, and interlink them meaningfully with international content across the internet.

Brown contributed two chapters to Bodies of Information: Intersectional Feminism and Digital Humanities:

  • “Delivery Service: Gender and the Political Unconscious of Digital Humanities”
  • “Project|Process|Product: Feminist Digital Subjectivity in a Shifting Scholarly Field” (with Kathryn Holland)

Paul Chafe

Write of Passage: Reflections on a Year of Write Here, Right Now: An Interactive Introduction to Academic Writing and Research (cancelled with regret; a version of this talk will be presented at Ryerson's Learning and Teaching Conference, May 16)

pressbooks.library.ryerson.ca/writehere

Abstract: In fall 2018, after two years of extensive preparation involving educators, librarians, graduate students, artists, designers and directors across many disciplines, the instructors of SSH 205 launched Write Here, Right Now, the new etextbook for SSH 205 (Academic Research and Writing). Funded by a grant from eCampusOntario, Write Here, Right Now is interactive and open access and is available for free to students enrolled in any university or college across Ontario. My talk today will reflect on this first year, investigate some of the data collected around the usage of the etext, and detail the experiences of the instructors and students who worked with Write Here, Right Now in the early days of its existence.

Bio: Paul Chafe is the Teaching Team Coordinator for SSH 205, Ryerson’s introductory writing course compulsory for the hundreds of Social Science and Humanities students entering Ryerson each year. He is the co-author, along with fellow SSH 205 instructor Aaron Tucker, of the open-access etext Write Here, Right Now. 


John Connolly

A New Dialogue: The Poetics of Artificial Intelligence

Abstract: Aaron Tucker's Punchlines (2015) and Irresponsible Mediums (2017) both create poetry at the interface between human and computer. By analyzing these works through theories of artificial intelligence and acting theory one can ask if artistic endeavours are solely the domain of humans. Exploring this human/machine binary involves the creation of a Turing Test for poetry; analyzing what it takes to pass this test helps us understand the sources of creativity.

Bio: John Connolly is a fourth-year English major at Ryerson and an undergraduate Research Assistant at the Centre for Digital Humanities. He will be pursuing a masters in public policy in September but his love for literature will forever keep his nose pressed to the pages of novels old and new.


Constance Crompton

Launching Lesbian and Gay Liberation in Canada

lglc.ca

Abstract: This presentation introduces the Lesbian and Gay Liberation in Canada website, a freely available database with over 34,000 records for the study of LGBT history in Canada. The site lets readers navigate between events, following their interests in particular people, places, or organizations, to reveal the connections that turn individual actions into a movement. The launch of LGLC will conclude with a short discussion of the project's technical architecture and workflow.

Bio: Constance Crompton is an assistant professor and Canada Research Chair in Digital Humanities at the University of Ottawa. An associate member of the CDH, she is VP-English of the Canadian Society for Digital Humanities / Société canadienne des humanités numériques and an associate director of the Digital Humanities Summer Institute at the University of Victoria.

Constance co-authored (with Michelle Schwartz, lead author) “Remaking History: Lesbian Feminist Historical Methods in the Digital Humanities” for Bodies of Information: Intersectional Feminism and Digital Humanities


Pascale Dangoisse

Launching Lesbian and Gay Liberation in Canada

lglc.ca

Bio: Pascale is a PhD candidate in Communication at the University of Ottawa. Her research focuses on the study of liberal political discourses on the topic of feminism and women’s rights in Canada. She started to work as a research assistant for the Lesbian and Gay Liberation in Canada project in the summer of 2018, and has been conducting archival research on Anglophone and Francophone lesbian organizing and writing in Canada. She is the manager of uOttawa's Humanities Data Lab.


Alessia Dickson

Childhood and the City Exhibit

Abstract: This exhibit aims to compare the pros and cons of urban childhood to rural childhood to determine where it is best to raise children from disadvantaged families in Korea. There is a special focus how urban and rural childhood affect the physical and emotional health of Korean children.

Bio: Alessia Dickson is a second year English major at Ryerson University hoping to pursue a career in creative writing with a focus on young adult literature.


Wendy Freeman

The Faces of Post-Print Pedagogy

Abstract: Open, digital, inclusive — what distinguishes post-print pedagogy beyond its digitalness? In this talk, various definitions of post-print pedagogy are explored to understand how they relate to our principles and goals for access in our teaching.

Bio: Wendy Freeman is an associate professor in the School of Professional Communication, Faculty of Communication and Design, the director of eLearning, and the interim director of the Learning and Teaching Office at Ryerson University. Her research interests examine how digital pedagogy can support students and improve their lives.


Marion Grant

Y90s Print and Performance: The Ellen Terry Project

personography.1890s.ca/y90s-print-and-performance

Abstract: This data visualization project demonstrates the intermedial relationship between the print and performance communities in Victorian London at the fin de siècle. I will discuss the digital tools and processes utilized in the Ellen Terry Project, an exhibit in the Y90s Personography Project Gallery combining the Y90s contributors data set and correspondence data set available through the Ellen Terry and Edith Craig Archive (ellenterryarchive.hull.ac.uk).

Bio: Marion is an M.A. candidate in Ryerson’s graduate programme in Literatures of Modernity. She has been a student research fellow at the Centre for Digital Humanities since January 2018 and is interested in Victorian literature, theatre, and culture. 


Naomi Hamer

ENG 810: Curating Digital Padlets on Childhood and the City

Abstract: The thematic focus of my Winter 2019 Advanced English Research Methods course is “Childhood and the City,” drawing on the Children’s Literature Archive at Ryerson University Library, the Osborne Collection of Early Children’s Books, the City of Toronto archives, and other accessible digital exhibits and collections. Student exhibits examine how written, visual, and cinematic representations of urban childhoods reflect diverse socio-cultural, political, legal, education, health, and leisure discourses in distinct contexts and time periods. This presentation will highlight how students used the Padlet app (in mobile and desktop format) for the planning and development of digital research exhibits.

Bio: Naomi Hamer is an Assistant Professor in the Department of English at Ryerson University. Her current research and publications examine the cross-media adaptation of children's literature with a focus on picture books, mobile apps, and children’s museums. She is the co-editor of More Words About Pictures: Current Research on Picture Books and Visual/Verbal Texts for Young People (with Nodelman and Reimer, 2017), and The Routledge Companion of Fairy-tale Cultures and Media (with Greenhill, Rudy, Hamer, and Bosc, 2018). She is also the President of the Association for Research in the Cultures of Young People (ARCYP).


Alison Hedley

Accessing Linked Biographical Data with the Yellow Nineties Personography

personography.1890s.ca

Abstract: The Yellow Nineties Personography is a database of contributors to the magazines of Y90s 2.0. I will discuss the multiple data access points that the Y90s Personography offers to users, which include searchable, linked contributor webpages; downloadable datasets; an expanding gallery of projects; and, currently in development, a network graph of persons. I will briefly highlight how LOD accessibility is important to the project’s queer praxis.

Bio: Alison Hedley is a postdoctoral fellow at the McGill University .txtLAB, a research fellow at the Ryerson Centre for Digital Humanities, and editor of the Yellow Nineties Personography.

Alison Hedley is lead author (with Lorraine Janzen Kooistra) on “Prototyping Personography for The Yellow Nineties Online: Queering and Querying History in the Digital Age” for Bodies of Information: Intersectional Feminism and Digital Humanities.


Lorraine Janzen Kooistra

Visualizing the Unmarked

beta.1890s.ca

Abstract: In 2016, I received a multi-year SSHRC Insight Grant in support of converting The Yellow Nineties Online (2010-2015) into Yellow Nineties 2.0, which we are presenting today in prototype. My talk addresses how principles of equity, diversity, and inclusion inform Y90s 2.0 collaborative practice, its commitment to open-access scholarship, and its aim to code in ways that make visible previously un(re)marked historical lives, networks, and patterns.

Bio: Lorraine Janzen Kooistra is Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and a Professor of English at Ryerson. Founding co-director of the Centre for Digital Humanities (CDH), she works at the intersection of Victorian illustrated print culture and the digital. She directs and edits Yellow Nineties 2.0, an open-access, peer-reviewed electronic resource for the study of eight aesthetic periodicals produced in Great Britain at the turn of the last century.

Lorraine Janzen Kooistra co-authored (with Alison Hedley, lead) “Prototyping Personography for The Yellow Nineties Online: Queering and Querying History in the Digital Age” for Bodies of Information: Intersectional Feminism and Digital Humanities.


Candice Lipski

Launching Lesbian and Gay Liberation in Canada

lglc.ca

Bio: Candice completed her undergraduate degree in Psychology at UBC Okanagan and is now a Journalism MA student at UBC. She has special interest in the social aspects of society as well as in arts and culture. She has worked on the Lesbian and Gay Liberation in Canada project's TEI and database creation since 2016.


Ann Ludbrook

Creating an open Digital Citizenship Toolkit: Improving Digital Literacy

Abstract: This talk will discuss the collaborative development, by a team of authors from around the world, of an open textbook on digital literacy called the Digital Citizenship Toolkit. It was created to help college and first year university students develop a higher-level critical lens in which to navigate the digital realm and tackles issues like privacy, authority, privilege, equity of information and online conduct. This discussion will address why these topics are a critical groundwork for students in a world of post-print pedagogy.

Bio: Ann holds a Masters in Library and Information Science from the University of Western Ontario, and an M.A. in English from York University. She has worked on a number of open educational resource (OER) projects while at Ryerson.


Ewan Matthews

Launching Lesbian and Gay Liberation in Canada

lglc.ca

Abstract: Many unique challenges presented themselves in creating a prosopography, or collective biography, of the 3,400 people included in the LGLC data, especially with regard to the socio-historic context of queer liberation. This talk will explore how queer-oriented data related to crime was included in the prosopography, parsed into workable data, and standardized despite its specificity.

The ArQuives (formerly the CLGA) has officially rebranded and asked that all references to them reflect this new name and URL: arquives.ca

Bio: Ewan Matthews is a Ryerson Arts student interested in history, literature, and language. He has worked on the LGLC since 2016.


Victoria Maxwell-Turanski

The Savoy Project: Marking up Images for Accessible Use

beta.1890s.ca/savoy-volumes

Abstract: This talk centres around the concept of accessibility in the realm of digital imagery. Through the example of The Savoy, a Victorian periodical that I have been working on extensively, I will describe the process of creating online space for all people who wish to use academic websites. There will be a break-down of the various steps necessary to ensure that accessible technology, such as screen-readers, can read imagery as a text and speak a prose description out loud, and I will also touch on tags, iconographic description, and metadata collection. I look forward to sharing the lessons I learned about my assumptions and mind-shifts in the quest to create a truly accessible experience.

Bio: Victoria is an English major at Ryerson University, graduating with her Honours Bachelor of Arts in the spring of 2019. She works as a student research assistant at the Centre for Digital Humanities at Ryerson University under the leadership of Dr. Lorraine Janzen Kooistra. In the fall of 2019 Victoria will become a student at Windsor Law School, where she will continue to be involved in accessibility and human rights work.


Eboni-Rai Mullings

The Cottage

Abstract: Playing as Hermione Granger, the player's objective is to rescue her kidnapped friends. In order to do this, the player must go through the cottage and gather tools and clues that will help to find and help her missing loved ones.

Bio: Eboni-Rai Mullings is a second year English student.


Adia Nesbeth

1)  Say Hello in Moscow: Children and Intercultural Relations in the City

Abstract 1: This digital exhibit compares the negative depictions of cross-cultural interactions in Kay Thompson's Eloise in Moscow to the idealistic interactions in Say Hello by Rachel Isadora. Further research provides context for propaganda in children's literature and highlights the benefits of multiculturalism both in books and in life.

2)  Landing Strategies  

Abstract 2: The premise of the game is that the player is at an Academy for students learning how to fight monsters, and they must explore the Emerald Forest in search of a partner and a relic. There are many side missions in the game that include objects known as dust crystals, each with a unique property. The player must interact with characters or search hiding spots to find the dust crystals.

Bio: Adia Nesbeth has just completed her First Year in English and this is her first experience in constructing and publishing a digital research exhibit and with programming a digital interactive story.


Andrew O’Malley

A Crisis of Innocence: Comic Books and Children’s Culture

crisisofinnocence.library.ryerson.ca/exhibits/show/a-crisis-of-innocence

Abstract: “A Crisis of Innocence: Comic Books and Children’s Culture, 1940-1954” is an Omeka-based DH project that combines an online database of print, film, and audio materials with an exhibition tracing the events, key figures, and publications that featured in the largest and farthest reaching child-protection campaign against popular media ever. Comic books were by far the most popular form of young people’s leisure reading, and were published in the U.S. and globally in the hundreds of millions each year. When parents, teachers, church leaders, lawmakers, and other concerned adults discovered that these 10-cent magazines, especially those in the "crime and horror" genres, often contained lurid depictions of sadistic and sometimes eroticized violence, there was a massive, international backlash that sought to re-assert childhood innocence by outlawing a form of youth culture that was seen to be jeopardizing it.

Bio: Andrew O’Malley is Associate Professor and Chair of the English Department at Ryerson, where he teaches courses and conducts research in Children’s Literature and Culture, the Eighteenth Century, and Comics. His presentation today is on his SSHRC-funded, critically curated online exhibition and collection focused on the furore over crime and horror comics and their child readers in the 1940s and 50s, a project he has been working on in fits and starts for over 5 years.


Alexandra Pospisil

From 1.0 to 2.0: Bringing 19th-century Lives into 2019

beta.1890s.ca/biographies

Abstract: This talk is primarily about the migration process from The Yellow Nineties Online to Yellow Nineties 2.0, beginning with the citation updates to MLA 8th edition, and the pursuit of absolute accuracy in reflecting the “2nd edition” nature of this content. Then, I’ll move on to my focus, Y90s Biographies, and will discuss the many moving parts involved in the publishing process — updating the XML files, transforming into HTML, and the final shift to Pods and Pages on WordPress. I’ll end on a note about what I’ve learned: The course of migration never did run smooth!

Bio: Alex is an M.A. Candidate in the Literatures of Modernity program at Ryerson, and holds an Honours B.A. in English from York University, as well as a Certificate in Technical and Professional Communication from Glendon College. She is currently an RA on Lorraine JanzenKooistra’s Y90s project, and is the resident “bio-expert.”


Serena Rice

Children in the Industrial Revolution: Looking Beyond the Nursery

Abstract: Through this project, my objective was to gain a new perspective on how children were portrayed in picture books during the Industrial Revolution. Focusing on Is it Well with the Child by Eve Garnett, I aim to shed more light on representations of lower, middle and upper class children by discussing what it meant to be a child in this age and by analyzing different images.

Bio: Serena Rice is a second year English/History Double major student at Ryerson University, and has a passion for looking at issues through a historical lens.


Michelle Schwartz

Launching Lesbian and Gay Liberation in Canada

lglc.ca

Abstract: This presentation introduces the Lesbian and Gay Liberation in Canada website, lglc.ca, a freely available database with over 34,000 records for the study of LGBT history in Canada. The site lets readers navigate between events, following their interests in particular people, places, or organizations, to reveal the connections that turn individual actions into a movement. The launch of lglc.ca will conclude with a short discussion of the project's technical architecture and workflow.

Bio: Michelle Schwartz is an Instructional Design and Research Strategist at Ryerson University’s Learning & Teaching Office and a Research Fellow within Ryerson’s Centre for Digital Humanities. She is also lecturer in the G. Raymond Chang School of Continuing Education.

Michelle is lead author (co-authored with Constance Crompton) of “Remaking History: Lesbian Feminist Historical Methods in the Digital Humanities” for Bodies of Information: Intersectional Feminism and Digital Humanities.


Hyacinth Simpson

Using Poetry to Foster Interdisciplinary Teaching and Learning: The Gardening in the Tropics Digital Humanities Project

ryerson.ca/olivesenior

Abstract: The presentation focuses on one of the poems and its related materials (critical commentary, study questions, resources for further study) on the Gardening in the Tropics website in order to demonstrate how poetry can be used to enhance the teaching of major Caribbean Studies topics and themes in other subject areas. The topic under discussion is among those identified in the subject-based syllabi approved by the Council that administers the Caribbean Advanced Proficiency Examination (CAPE).

Bio: Hyacinth Simpson’s main area of teaching and research is Caribbean Studies, including poetry, films, and short stories from the region and its diasporas. Her digital humanities projects are aimed at creating critical resources on Caribbean literary and other cultural productions for use in senior high school and undergraduate classrooms, and at providing students and their instructors ready access to these resources.


Anne-Marie Singh

Documenting Racialized and Indigenous Contributions: The Criminal Justice Firsts Project

ryerson.ca/criminaljusticefirsts

Abstract: We discuss the creation of the CJFP. It is a website that documents Indigenous and racialized individuals who were among the first to enter the professions of policing, courts and corrections. The under-representation of these groups as criminal justice officials is a manifestation of systemic racism. As a teaching and research tool, the CJFP brings together information from various sources to highlight the contributions of and challenges faced by these criminal justice trailblazers.

Bio: Anne-Marie Singh is a sociologist who teaches and researches in criminology. She has actively engaged in anti-racism and decolonization at Ryerson, in her disciplinary fields and at the community level in domestic and international contexts.


MJ Suhonos

Accessing Linked Biographical Data with the Yellow Nineties Personography

Abstract: The Yellow Nineties Personography is a database of contributors to the magazines of Y90s 2.0. I will discuss the multiple data access points that the Y90s Personography offers to users, which include searchable, linked contributor webpages; downloadable datasets; an expanding gallery of projects; and, currently in development, a network graph of persons. I will briefly highlight how LOD accessibility is important to the project’s queer praxis.

Bio:  MJ Suhonos is the Digital Technologies Development Librarian at Ryerson University. Actively involved in the library technology and semantic web communities, he has given talks and workshops on linked open data, structured metadata management, and collaborative open source development practices.


Curtis Sassur

Working at the Intersection of the Material and the Digital

library.ryerson.ca/asc/archives

Description: Introduction to the Archives & Special Collections holdings and reading room, as well as a discussion about accessing primary source material collections in our repository. 

Bio: Curtis Sassur works as Ryerson University’s lone archivist, where he has been on the faculty since 2013. He graduated from the University of Toronto in 2008, and has been working in Toronto as an archivist ever since.


Matthew Wells

Gamifying Fiction with Inform 7

Abstract: With the recent surge of interest in digital gaming, particularly among younger demographics, incorporating game design into the modern classroom is an ideal way to connect with and empower students. Inform 7 is a development system for interactive fiction, a text-based game genre that combines storytelling with puzzle solving. Over the course of the winter 2019 semester, a group of students at Ryerson have been using Inform 7 both to create works of interactive fiction, and to learn about the relationships between languages, models, and computation. This presentation will discuss the materials used to teach these students from the perspective of the course instructor.

Bio:  Matthew Wells is a SSHRC Postdoctoral Fellow, working with Dr. Jason Boyd. His research interests include digital gaming, the history of gaming, as well as pedagogical game development tools.


Sally Wilson

Remembering the Real Winnie: Bringing a Small Archival Collection to Life on the Web

therealwinnie.ryerson.ca 

Abstract:  The multi-disciplinary Remembering the Real Winnie project consisted of many separate components including a physical exhibit, a video, an interactive story and a digital collection website.  This talk will focus on the collection website and illustrate how flip books, geospatial referencing and 3D scanning were used to enhance the user experience, providing new ways of engaging with and viewing the contents of the collection.

Bio: Sally Wilson is the Web Services Librarian at Ryerson University. In addition to managing the Library's various websites, she has recently been involved in several Open Educational Resource (OER) projects including building an Open Library for Ontario post-secondary institutions.

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