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“American Annals; or, a Chronological History of America from Its Discovery in 1492 to 1806.” Quarterly, 2, no. 4: (1809): 319–37.
        Discusses the work of Dr. [Abiel] Holmes by summarizing key points and scrutinizing missing material, lack of sufficient information, and having too broad and unmanageable a focus. Reviewed: Holmes, Abiel. American Annals; or, a Chronological History of America from its Discovery in 1492 to 1806.
“The History of Barbadoes, from the First Discovery of the Island in the Year 1605, till the Accession of Lord Seaforth, 1801.” Quarterly, 1, no. 2: (1809): 258–68.
        Briefly discusses John Poyer’s book, stating that this account is uninteresting but does not truly explore the history of the Island. The article then moves on to offer detailed information about the Island beyond governmental affairs by commenting on the slave trade and the population problems of the colonial islands of the West Indies. Reviewed: Poyer, John. The History of Barbadoes from the first discovery of the island in the year 1605, till the accession of Lord Seaforth, 1801.
“A History of the Political Life of the Right Honourable William Pitt; Including Some Account of the Times in Which He Lived.” Quarterly, 4, no. 7: (1810): 207–71.
        A mixed review of Gifford’s political biography of William Pitt (1708-1778). The reviewer attacks the sources used, points out the elements of this period that have been overlooked, discusses the bias that can occur when writing history, and instructs readers as to how a political biography should be written. Reviewed: : Gifford, John. A History of the Political Life of the Right Honourable William Pitt; including some Account of the Times in which he lived.
“Ecclesiastical Biography, or Lives of Eminent Men Connected with the History of Religion in England, from the Commencement of the Reformation to the Revolution.” Quarterly, 4, no. 7: (1810): 93–103.
        Examines the bibliographical scholarship of Christopher Wordsworth, which addresses the biographies of men of the English Church in the 16th and 17th century. The review focuses on how Wordsworth selected subjects and biographers. Points out the importance of respecting historical sources and the usefulness of bringing old works together in a new collection. Reviewed: Wordsworth, Christopher. Ecclesiastical Biography, or Lives of Eminent Men connected with the history of Religion in England, from the commencement of the Reformation to the Revolution.
“History of Brazil.” Quarterly, 4, no. 8: (1810): 454–74.
        Examines the first volume of Robert Southey’s History of Brazil, which focuses on 16th-century events. For the most part, the reviewer praises the work. Commends Southey for his work’s demonstration of the interaction of the European settlers, both with each other and with the native population. Reviewed: Southey. Robert. History of Brazil. See also 1817 review of vol 2.
“The History, Ecclesiastical and Civil, and Survey of the Antiquities of Winchester.” Quarterly, 3, no. 6: (1810): 347–68.
        A mixed review (and summary) of Rev. John Milner’s book. Observes that readers may be prejudiced by the author’s beliefs and principles; much of the evidence used is not credible or sufficient. Nevertheless this is a work unrivalled in many areas. Reviewed: Milner, John. The History, Ecclesiastical and Civil, and Survey of Antiquities of Winchester.
“A History of the Colleges, Halls, and Public Buildings Attached to the University of Oxford, Including the Lives of the Founders.” Quarterly, 6, no. 11: (1811): 87–98.
        States that this work is accurate and judicious, however the author has omitted some valuable topics. Then the reviewer goes on to offer detailed discussion of content with many lengthy excerpts from the work. Reviewed: Chambers, Alexander. History of the Colleges, Halls, and Public Buildings attached to the University of Oxford, including the Lives of the Founders.
“Historical Sketches of the South of India; in an Attempt to Trace the History of Mysoor, from the Origin of the Hindoo Government of That State, to the Extinction of the Mahommedan Dynasty in 1799, &c.” Quarterly, 6, no. 11: (1811): 103–24.
        Reviewer offers a lengthy detailed summary but very little opinion about the work as whole, stating that a real opinion will be given when the next and final volume is completed. Reviewed: Wilks, Lieut Col. Historical Sketches of the South of India; in an Attempt to trace the History of Mysoor, from the Origin of the Hindoo Government of that State, to the Extinction of the Mahommedan Dynasty in 1799 (1810). See entry for remaining volumes in 1817.
“History of Ancient Wiltshire.” Quarterly, 6, no. 12: (1811): 440–48.
        This second notice states that the book is well-organized, well-illustrated , and discusses new subject matter with judiciousness and knowledge. Offers an in-depth look at a few of the topics in the work and states that overall it this volume as well done as its predecessor. Reviewed: : Hoarse, Sir Richard Colt. History of Ancient Wiltshire. Part II.
“The History of Ancient Wiltshire.” Quarterly, 5, no. 9: (1811): 111–20.
        Review presents some of the findings in the book that can be challenged and discusses the benefits and faults of the information, illustrations and sources used. Reviewed: Hoarse, Sir Richard Colt. The History of Ancient Wiltshire.
“The History of Mauritius and the Neighbouring Islands, &c. &c.” Quarterly, 5, no. 9: (1811): 229–41.
        Observes that, although the book is oddly structured, it brings together the many biographies it utilizes in a useful and beneficial manner and that it is beyond criticism. There is then a very detailed summary of the contents, which discusses the history of the Islands, their people, their exports, and the benefits of islands to the French and British. Reviewed: Viscount de Vaux, Charles Grant. The History of Mauritius and the neighbouring Islands.
“The History of the Inquisitions; Including the Secret Transactions of Those Horrific Tribunals.” Quarterly, 6, no. 12: (1811): [313]-357.
        Review of three works. The anonymous History ‘will do harm rather than good, because the manufacturer of it has indiscriminately heaped together truth and falsehood’ about Catholicism and the Inquisition Reviewed: The History of the Inquisitions; including the Secret Transactions of those Horrific Tribunals (Stockdale, 1810) and two other works.
“History of the Reformation in Scotland; with an Introductory Book and an Appendix.” Quarterly, 7, no. 13: (1812): 107–20.
        Comments that the author presents his work with impartiality and moral sense. But some further topics could have been included and others expanded. Reviewed: Cooke, George. History of the Reformation in Scotland; with an Introductory Book and an Appendix. (1811).
“Present State of the Spanish Colonies; Including a Particular Report of Hispaniola, or the Spanish Part of Santo Domingo; with a General Survey of the Settlements on the South Continent of America, as Relates to the History, Trade, Population, Customs, Manners, &c. with a Concise Statement of the Sentiments of the People on Their Relative Situation to The.” Quarterly, 7, no. 14: (1812): [235]-264.
        Notes that this work contains too many and varied topics; fewer topics examined in more depth would have been preferable. Reviewed: Walton, William. Present State of the Spanish Colonies; including a particular Report of Hispaniola, or the Spanish Part of Santo Domingo; with a general Survey of the Settlements on the South Continent of America, as relates to the History, Trade, Population, Customs, Manners, &c. with a concise Statement of the Sentiments of the People on their relative Situation to the Mother Country. (1812).
“The History of the European Commerce with India. To Which Is Subjoined, a Review of the Arguments for and against the Trade with India, and the Management of It by a Chartered Company.” Quarterly, 7, no. 15: (1812): 114–44.
        Judges that this work fills in the gaps of knowledge on this subject; it is well laid-out and overall well-done. Reviewed: Macpherson, David. The History of the European Commerce with India. To which is subjoined, a Review of the Arguments for and against the Trade with India, and the Management of it by a Chartered Company. (1812).
“History of Dissenters, from the Revolution in 1688, to the Year 1808.” Quarterly, 10, no. 19: (1813): 90–139.
        The content of the three works reviewed is discussed and the similar or competing claims about related subject matter is examined. Reviewed: Bogue, James & James Bennett. History of Dissenters, from the Revolution in 1688, to the year 1808. (1812).
“The Life of John Knox, Containing Illustrations of the History of the Reformation in Scotland, with Biographical Notices of the Principal Reformers, and Sketches of the Progress of Literature in Scotland, during a Great Part of the Sixteenth Century.” Quarterly, 9, no. 18: (1813): 418–33.
        Judges this work to be ample, original, and well sourced. Reviewed: McCrie, Thomas. The Life of John Knox, containing Illustrations of the History of the Reformation in Scotland, with Biographical Notices of the principal Reformers, and Sketches of the Progress of Literature in Scotland, during a great Part of the Sixteenth Century. (See later review of 1851 new edition.).
“History of the Azores, or Western Islands; Containing an Account of the Government, Laws, and Religion; the Manners, Ceremonies, and Character of the Inhabitants; and Demonstrating the Importance of These Valuable Islands to the British Empire.” Quarterly, 11, no. 21: (1814): 190–203.
        An essay on exploration and discovery. Reviewed: Ashe, Thomas. History of the Azores, or Western Islands; containing an Account of the Government, Laws, and Religion; the Manners, Ceremonies, and Character of the Inhabitants; and demonstrating the Importance of these valuable Islands to the British Empire. (1813).
“An Account of the Kingdom of Caubul and Its Dependencies in Persia, Tartary, and India; Comprizing a View of the Afghaun Nation, and a History of the Doorqunee Monarchy.” Quarterly, 14, no. 27: (1815): 152–88.
        Critiques another periodical for calling this work ‘distinguished’. Unfortunately the mission to Afghanistan had no expertise on antiquarian research or physical science; mostly concerned with contemporary international politics, i.e. with Russia. Reviewed: Elphinstone, Hon. Mountstuart. An Account of the Kingdom of Caubul and its Dependencies in Persia, Tartary, and India; comprizing a View of the Afghaun Nation, and a History of the Doorqunee Monarchy. 1815.
“A History of Inventions and Discoveries,.” Quarterly, 14, no. 28: (1816): 405–29.
        The author’s work is scholarly and philosophical, but the translator has arranged the numerous ‘dissertations’ in a disorderly way. Reviewed: Beckmann, John. A History of Inventions and Discoveries. Trans. William Johnston. 1815.
“Symbolic Illustrations of the History of England, from the Roman Invasion to the Present Time, Accompanied with a Narrative of the Principal Events, Designed More Particularly for the Instruction of Young Persons.” Quarterly, 15, no. 30: (1816): 418–19.
        Criticizes this work, and its method of teaching history through illustrations alone, as not useful and actually rather absurd. States that these illustrations need many pages of explanation in any case and that, even with the written explanations provided, this illustrative attempt at teaching history is not very effective. Reviewed: Rundall, Mary Ann. Symbolic Illustrations of the History of England, from the Roman Invasion to the present Time, accompanied with a Narrative of the Principal Events, designed more particularly for the Instruction of Young Persons. 1815.
“The History of Persia, from the Most Early Period to the Present Time: Containing an Account of the Religion, Government, Usages, and Character of the Inhabitants of That Kingdom.” Quarterly, 15, no. 29: (1816): 236–92.
        Praise for the author’s ‘candour and industry’ despite ‘the appalling fables’ which make up the earlier chapters of Persian history. Reviewed: Malcolm, Col. Sir John. The History of Persia, from the most Early Period to the Present Time: containing an Account of the Religion, Government, Usages, and Character of the Inhabitants of that Kingdom.
“Historical Sketches of the South of India; in an Attempt to Trace the History of Mysoor; from the Origin of the Hindoo Government of That State to the Extinction of the Mahomedan Dynasty in 1799.” Quarterly, 18, no. 35: (1817): 47–73.
        Very detailed account of India in 18th century; the author is charged with indiscretion , even calumny, in describing British officers’ behaviour. Reviewed: Wilks, Col. Mark. Historical Sketches of the South of India; in an Attempt to trace the History of Mysoor; from the Origin of the Hindoo Government of that State to the Extinction of the Mahomedan Dynasty in 1799. Vol. II/Vol. III. 1817. See also review of earlier volumes in 1811.
“The History of Brazil.” Quarterly, 18, no. 35: (1817): 99–128.
        A lengthy essay on the subject-matter, with reference to Southey’s merits and defects as a historian. The subject is too vast and various for his biographical and narrative talents. Reviewed: Southey, Robert. The History of Brazil. Vol. II. See also 1810 review of Vol. 1.
“The History of Java.” Quarterly, 17, no. 33: (1817): 72–96.
        Regrets that the island has remained part of the Dutch empire. Historical information thrown hastily together. Reviewed: Raffles, Thomas Stamford. The History of Java. 1817.
“The History of Small-Pox.” Quarterly, 19, no. 38: (1818): 357–75.
        Includes a narrative of ancient -- and Chinese -- understandings of smallpox but the thrust of the article is contemporary public-health policy. A History of Vaccination by the same author is also reviewed and judged less admirable. Reviewed: Moore, James. The History of Small-pox.
“The Secret and True History of the Church of Scotland, from the Restoration to the Year 1678.” Quarterly, 18, no. 36: (1818): 502–41.
        Not an account of history, but a collection of the materials for such an account -- ‘of a dark and turbulent period’. Reviewed: The Secret and True History of the Church of Scotland, from the Restoration to the year 1678. By the Rev. Mr James Kirkton . . . Ed from the MS by Charles Kirkpartick Sharpe. 1817.
“Analysis and Review of a Recent Publication, Entitled "Horae Britannicae, or Studies in Ancient British History.” Imperial Magazine, 1, no. 5: (May 1819): 465–66.
        Part 1 of Review of John Hughes, Horae Britannicae, or Studies in Ancient British History (1818/1819).
“History, Description, and Newly Discovered Antiquities, of Agricola’s Rampart, Adrian’s Mound, and Severus’s Stone Wall; with Profiles of Each, Drawn to Their Proper Heights and Dimensions; with a Scale of Feet.” Imperial Magazine, 1, no. 7: (July 1819): 661–64.
        This article examines a newly discovered historical structure dating from the Roman period. Adrian’s Mound (Hadrian’s Wall), Severus’s Wall, and Agricola’s Rampart are examined with great detail to their appearance and dimensions.
“Review--"The History of Dublin," 2.” Imperial Magazine, 1, no. 9: (September 1819): 811–12.
        Offers the content of each volume of this work and states who wrote each volume and praises the work for its accuracy and useful information.
“Review. ‘Horae Britannicae, or Studies in Ancient British History, Containing Disquisitions on the National and Religious Antiquities of Great Britain.’” Imperial Magazine, 2, no. 12: (February 1820): 67–69.
        Part 2 of review of John Hughes’ 1819 book.
“SINGULAR PIECE OF HISTORY.” Imperial Magazine, 2, no. 12: (February 1820): 61–63.
        This article briefly discusses the life of Richard Plantagenet, by tradition the natural son of Richard III. Events occurring in both men’s lives are discussed.
“Review. Horae Britannicae, Or Studies in Ancient British History.” Imperial Magazine, 2, no. 13: (March 1820): 149–54.
        Part 3 of review of book by John Hughes.
“The History of Greece.” Quarterly, 25, no. 49: (1821): 154–74.
        Despite ‘acuteness and patient investigation’, Mitford is ‘singularly deficient’ in this work. A narrative without analysis, lacking eloquence and enthusiasms. And the style is ‘obscure, inharmonious and ungrammatical’. Closes by drawing parallels between the histories of Greece and Britain. Reviewed: Mitford, William. The History of Greece. Volume 5.
H., A.“OBSERVATIONS ON THE STUDY OF HISTORY.” Imperial Magazine, 3, no. 29: (July 1821): 591–92.
        An article providing general observations on how to look at history. It is stated that the experience of other states, particularly in politics and government, should be attended to, . Only actions that create beneficial results should be repeated. The author warns, however, that certain actions apply to particular situations, meaning that beneficial results cannot occur from a single action. Also of importance is a knowledge of the history of one’s own country, which leads to understanding of its laws and practices.
“OBSERVATIONS ON THE HISTORY OF THE POTATO.” Imperial Magazine, 3, no. 31: (September 1821): 797–99.
        This article discusses the introduction of the potato to Europe in 1623, and ideal soil conditions for its growth. Also discussed is the potato’s popularity among the peasant class, and its role as a delicacy among the upper classes.
“The Civil and Constitutional History of Rome, from Its Foundation to the Age of Augustus.” Quarterly, 27, no. 54: (1822): [273]-308.
        Lengthy commentary which ignores the book at hand. Concludes with observation of Bankes’s deficiency with respect to investigation, reflection and style. Falls short of ‘those qualities with which we have ventured to invest the character of the genuine historian.’ Reviewed: Bankes, Henry. The Civil and Constitutional History of Rome, from its Foundation to the Age of Augustus. 1818.
“Anecdote of the Rev. J. Walch (Taken from Mr. Murray’s Literary History of Galloway).” Imperial Magazine, 4, no. 44: (September 1822): 829–30.
        This article describes a Protestant clergyman coming under the protection of Louis XIII of France.
“The History and Conversion of the Jewish Boy,.” Imperial Magazine, 4, no. 44: (September 1822): 865–66.
        The reviewer quickly summarizes this 1822 book, and commends it for its message and usefulness to its readers.
“Brief Sketch of the Life of Thuanus, with Copious Notes to the Dedication of His History of France, &c.” Imperial Magazine, 4, no. 46: (November 1822): 1059–60.
        Briefly discusses this 1821 book by Josiah Walker, offering excerpts and concluding that it will be useful.
“A SHORT HISTORY OF CATHARINA ALEXOWNA, WIFE OF PETER THE GREAT, EMPEROR OF RUSSIA.” Imperial Magazine, 4, no. 47: (December 1822): 1191–93.
        This article discusses the humble beginnings and later life of Catharina Alexowna (1691-1727) who married Peter the Great.
“A Memoir of Central India, Including Malwa and Adjoining Provinces; with the History, and Copious Illustrations, of the Past and Present Condition of That Country.” Quarterly, 29, no. 58: (1823): 382–414.
        Complacent assessment of the excellence of ‘the ruling powers in this distant and magnificent appendage to the British empire’. Malcolm’s book is praised for his extensive knowledge of contemporary conditions in India, but the work also includes historical and geographical knowledge. Reviewed: Malcolm, John. A Memoir of Central India, including Malwa and adjoining Provinces; with the History, and copious Illustrations, of the Past and Present Condition of that Country. 1823.
“Bishop Burnet’s History of His Own Time: With the Suppressed Passages of the First Volume, and Notes by the Earls of Dartmouth and Hardwicke and Speaker Onslow, Hitherto Unpublished. To Which Are Added the Cursory Remarks of Swift, and Other Observations.” Quarterly, 29, no. 57: (1823): 165–213.
        This book is part of an Oxford (Clarendon Press) series of new editions of historical works. Reviewed: Burnet, Gilbert. Bishop Burnet’s History of his Own Time: with the suppressed Passages of the First Volume, and Notes by the Earls of Dartmouth and Hardwicke and Speaker Onslow, hitherto unpublished. To which are added the Cursory Remarks of Swift, and other Observations.
“History of the Peninsular War.” Quarterly, 29, no. 57: (1823): 53–85.
        Reviewer expresses great pride in Englishmen’s contribution; praises Southey’s talents and experience, industry, research, style, knowledge etc. Concludes with some quibbles with respect to excessive detail. Reviewed: Southey, Robert. History of the Peninsular War. Vol. I. 1823.
“HISTORY OF CLOCKS AND WATCHES.” Imperial Magazine, 5, no. 58: (October 1823): 897–900.
        This article discusses the methods of measuring time, moving from the ancient use of fluids dripping into a vessel (clepsydra or water clocks), to sun dials to watches. The author also raises debate over who invented the first timepiece; he suggests Boethius or Pacificus.
Barrow, John.“The Character of the Russians, and a Detailed History of Moscow, &c.” Quarterly, 31, no. 61: (April 1824): 146–66.
        Dismisses most of the book as ‘being constructed of those materials which usually make up our half-crown Guides to watering places’. Lyall is a Scottish physician and traveller. Book is not even mediocre; ‘the style is mean and vulgar’. Reviewed: Lyall, Robert. The Character of the Russians, and a detailed History of Moscow. 1823. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“Sequel to the Grammar of Sacred History, &c.” Imperial Magazine, 6, no. 66: (June 1824): 571.
        Briefly reviews an 1824 work on the church by Mary Ann Rundall. Claims the work is well arranged, contains good information, is well thought out and written with much passion for the subject but may only be considered interesting to those truly interested in the subject at hand.
Arnold, Thomas.“Romische Geschichte, von B. G. Niebuhr. History of Rome.” Quarterly, 32, no. 63: (June 1825): 67–92.
        Niebuhr’s book has been in print for 12 years at the time of this review, but its excellence is not well known in Britain. Admires German historical scholarship in general. Reviewed: Niebuhr, B.G. Romische Geschichte, von B. G. Niebuhr. History of Rome. 1811/1812. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Procter, George.“The History of Ancient and Modern Wines.” Quarterly, 32, no. 63: (June 1825): 232–62.
        Review is focused more on the chemistry of wine, ancient and modern, than on the history of its making and use. Includes extensive excerpts and concludes with the question of whether wine-making should be attempted in England. Reviewed: Henderson, A. The History of Ancient and Modern Wines. 1825. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“The History of the English General Baptists.” Imperial Magazine, 7, no. 78: (June 1825): 555–56.
        Examines Adam Taylor’s work on the Baptists by commending his well-researched, interesting, and unbiased account.
“Self-Advancement, or Extraordinary Transitions from Obscurity to Greatness, Exemplified in the Lives and History of Thirteen Eminent Men.” Imperial Magazine, 7, no. 80: (August 1825): 763–64.
        In purportedly reviewing this collection of biographies, the reviewer merely seems to explain how one comes to be considered worthy of the immortality of having a biography written. The anonymous author is identified as: Author of ‘Practical Wisdom’.
“Essays on Various Subjects of Ecclesiastical History and Antiquity.” Imperial Magazine, 7, no. 82: (October 1825): 941–42.
        Examines James Townley’s collection of essays on the Christian religion and states that although the work can often seem imposing and inconclusive it does shed considerable light on its subject.
“History of Scotland,.” Imperial Magazine, 7, no. 82: (October 1825): 959.
        Very brief discussion of Scottish history books used primarily to teach children in school. States that although these works do lack some information, and could benefit from additions, they suit their purpose sufficiently. Under review: Robert Simpson, History of Scotland, and Oliver Goldsmith. History of Greece, of Rome, and of England, abridged, and the latter continued by the same author.
Robinson, H.“ON THE UTILITY OF HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHY.” Imperial Magazine, 7, no. 83: (November 1825): 1003–4.
        Robinson demonstrates the importance of history, which is its utility in areas such as morals and virtue. Robinson also briefly discusses biography. He states that biography serves a higher purpose than teaching goodness, because it enforces and persuades.
“THE HISTORY OF THE BRITISH CURRENCY, TO 1821.” Imperial Magazine, 7, no. 83: (November 1825): 983–86.
        This article discusses English coins, tracing them back to the first English coin in the time of Ethelbert. Also discussed is the print on the coin, the introduction of new coins caused by the separation of land, and coins introduced by various rulers. The author also mentions the origins of gold and copper coins, along with their value. The coverage is from the thirteenth century to 1821.
“ANALYSIS OF FABER’S CORROBORATION OF THE PENTATEUCH FROM HISTORY, TRADITION, AND MYTHOLOGY.” Imperial Magazine, 8, no. 87: (March 1826): 225–30.
        This article discusses the many aspects of history and mythology according to groups such as the Goths, Hindus and Chinese. Countless interpretations of the creation story, the primitive state (first inhabitants), the serpent story, the redeemer and the giants are incorporated. Also discussed is the scriptural flood and the destruction of Sodom.
“Narrative of a Tour through Hawaii, or Owhyhee; with Remarks on the History, Traditions, Manners, Customs, and Language of the Inhabitants of the Sandwich Islands.” Imperial Magazine, 8, no. 88: (April 1826): 369–73.
        Examines the 1826 work of William Ellis, which focuses on the landscape, inhabitants, and traditions of Hawaii. In describing the content of the work and offering lengthy excerpts the reviewer judges the book to be of great merit and well-known among missionary publications.
“A History of Methodism in the Town and Neighbourhood of Great Yarmouth, &c.” Imperial Magazine, 8, no. 89: (June 1826): 579.
        Examines the 1826 work of A. Watmough on the local history of Methodism in Great Yarmouth. States that this work is narrowly focused on one region and may only be interesting to locals; moreover its sources are scant. Nevertheless its structure for studying local history is very effective and may be useful for others to take notice of.
Palgrave, Francis.“The History of England, from the Invasion of Julius Caesar to the Revolution of 1688.” Quarterly, 34, no. 67: (June 1826): 248–98.
        The anonymous reviewer (Palgrave) of a new edition takes the opportunity to critique Hume’s methodology and scholarship. Reviewed: Hume, David. The History of England, from the Invasion of Julius Caesar to the Revolution of 1688. 1825. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“A Chronology of Ancient History,.” Imperial Magazine, 8, no. 91: (July 1826): 665–66.
        Offers a brief summary of topics and claims that although Mary Martha Sherwood’s chronological narrative does run into some problems it is overall entertaining and instructive. Full title: Mrs Sherwood. Chronology of Ancient History, illustrated by Parallel Streams of Time; or an Historical and Geographical Account of the various Nations of the Earth, from the Deluge to Birth of Christ. (1826).
A., N.B.“REFLECTION ON THE USE OF HISTORY.” Imperial Magazine, 8, no. 93: (September 1826): 801–5.
        The author states that we must look beyond history and biography to consider the consequences of human action. To overcome this problem, A.N.B. incorporates the stories of characters throughout history where the consequences were not considered; characters such as Brutus, Antony and Octavius, etc.
“The History of the Church of Christ, &c.” Imperial Magazine, 9, no. 97: (January 1827): 85–88.
        Reviews John Scott’s 1826 continuation of Milner’s Church History, 1533-1546, summarizing content and summarizing the appendix , commenting on the use of sources and writing, and stating that although this work only examines 16 years and needs to be further continued, it is still useful.
Ellis, Henry.“The Political History of India, from 1784 to 1823.” Quarterly, 35, no. 69: (January 1827): 32–66.
        Notes that Malcolm’s earlier Political Sketch of India is incorporated as the first 5 chapters of this work, which is also primarily concerned with contemporary and recent history. Also comments on two other pamphlets. Reviewed: Malcolm, John. The Political History of India, from 1784 to 1823. 1826. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“The History of Scotland.” Imperial Magazine, 9, no. 100: (April 1827): 377.
        Review of Alexander Stewart’s 1826 work on the history of Scotland states that all the essential elements of Scottish history are present without being overdone and this book will prove to be useful to students learning the basics of Scottish history.
“HISTORY OF THE BRITISH PARLIAMENT.” Imperial Magazine, 9, no. 102: (June 1827): 551–53.
        This article discusses Parliament from its first assembly in England in 1116, with comments on the components of parliament, the duration of a parliament and causes for a parliament to end. The author also includes a chart that shows the duration of each parliament beginning at the time of Henry VIII and ending with George IV.
Edwards, Edward.“The History of the British and Foreign Bible Society.” Quarterly, 36, no. 71: (June 1827): 1–28.
        Owen’s history of the BFBS’s first twenty years is subsumed in the context of a contemporary dispute over publishing the apocryphal books of the Bible. Reviewed: Owen, John. The History of the British and Foreign Bible Society. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“Elements of the History of Philosophy and Science,.” Imperial Magazine, 9, no. 104: (August 1827): 759–60.
        Examines the 1827 work of Thomas Morell, noting the structure of the book, its focus, and the content and usefulness of information. States that this work is very useful for general knowledge of its subject area but lacks in-depth discussion of specific subjects and omits various important areas.
“The History of the Province of Moray.” Imperial Magazine, 9, no. 104: (August 1827): 753–55.
        Examines the 1827 second edition of Lachlan Shaw’s history of the province of Moray, in Scotland. Looks at the new additions to this edition and commends the work on its further merit in providing a history of this Scottish region. Also briefly discusses the problems faced when writing local history.
“A Chronology of Ancient History,.” Imperial Magazine, 9, no. 107: (November 1827): 1049–50.
        Examines second (1827) edition of Mary Martha Sherwood’s work centred on ancient history and claims it to be as effective and well laid out as the first edition. Also claims that this work is useful for a foundation of ancient history for scholars and curious youths alike.
“Babylon Destroyed, or the History of the Empire of Assyria, Compiled from Rollin, Prideaux, and Others.” Imperial Magazine, 9, no. 107: (November 1827): 1055–56.
        Very briefly discusses the content and merit of this 1827 work, which is a compilation from Rollin, Prideaux, and others.
“Stories from the History of Scotland, &c.” Imperial Magazine, 9, no. 107: (November 1827): 1049.
        Discusses Alexander Stewart’s 1827 collection and applauds the author for his efforts in presenting Scottish history in a complete and entertaining manner.
Blunt, J. J.“History of the Progress and Suppression of the Reformation in Italy, in the Sixteenth Century; Including a Sketch of the History of the Reformation in the Grisons.” Quarterly, 37, no. 73: (January 1828): 50–84.
        A discussion of critics of the Catholic Church before Luther. Reviewed: McCrie, Thomas. History of the Progress and Suppression of the Reformation in Italy, in the Sixteenth Century; including a Sketch of the History of the Reformation in the Grisons. 1827. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Southey, Robert and Edward Edwards.“The Constitutional History of England, from the Accession of Henry VII. to the Death of George II.” Quarterly, 37, no. 73: (January 1828): 194–260.
        The anonymous reviewers (Southey and Edwards) are skeptical of the notion of separating constitutional from political and other aspects of history, and more generally of Hallam’s partisanship. He is accused of misrepresentation, sophistry and special pleading. Reviewed: Hallam, Henry. The Constitutional History of England, from the Accession of Henry VII. to the Death of George II. 1827. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“HISTORIA MONASTERII PETRIBURGENSIS; OR, AN EPITOME OF GUNSTONE’S HISTORY OF THE CHURCH OF PETERBOROUGH, NORTHAMPTONSHIRE, WITH AN ENGRAVING.--BY THOMAS ROSE.” Imperial Magazine, 10, no. 112: (April 1828): 331–35.
        This article discusses the history of Peterborough and includes information such as the history of ruling families in that area and the construction of the monastery of Medeshamstead (Peterborough) by these families. Also discussed is the different abbots of the monastery, beginning with Saxulph in 660 A.D.
Southey, Robert.“Chronological History of the West Indies.” Quarterly, 38, no. 75: (July 1828): 193–241.
        Review discusses the work of a Royal Navy captain, who has pulled together various chronicles to lay out what the reviewer describes as a shameful story. Concludes with comments on modern colonization in Australia. Reviewed: Southey, (Captain) Thomas. Chronological History of the West Indies. 1827. (Attribution Wellesley Index}.
“Scott’s Continuation of Milner’s Church History.” Imperial Magazine, 10, no. 116: (August 1828): 763.
        Discusses Vol. II, Part 1. (1828) of John Scott’s continuation of Milner’s Church History, stating that although its geographical focus is limited its sources are of much merit that the work is overall very useful and satisfactory.
“Scripture History for Youth.” Imperial Magazine, 11, no. 124: (April 1829): 371.
        In the reviewer’s view, although this 1828 book by Esther Hewlett does not have much academic value, it is straightforward, entertaining and is a useful addition to any juvenile library.
Southey, Robert.“The History and Antiquities of the County Palatine of Durham.” Quarterly, 39, no. 78: (April 1829): 360–405.
        Praise for local histories in general, and comments on the difficulty of writing this particular history. Reviewed: Surtees, Robert. The History and Antiquities of the County Palatine of Durham. 1816-1828. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“Roman History for Youth,.” Imperial Magazine, 11, no. 127: (July 1829): 663.
        Although it is very brief and sweeps over, or ignores, important events Thomas Rose’s 1829 book, in the reviewer’s eyes, contains useful illustrations and is beneficial to its target audience.
“The History of Initiation, in Three Courses of Lectures, Comprising a Detailed Account of the Rites and Ceremonies, Doctrines and Discipline, of All the Secret and Mysterious Institutions of the Ancient World.” Imperial Magazine, 11, no. 127: (July 1829): 645–47.
        Discusses in great detail the contents of this 1829 book by George Oliver, offering lengthy excerpts, but states little about its merits.
“History of the Christian Church, from the First to the Nineteenth Century.” Imperial Magazine, 11, no. 129: (September 1829): 853–54.
        Identifies the subject as a daunting task and states that this 1829 book is interesting, useful, intelligent, and faithful. Anonymous author described as ‘the author of “Reformation”.’
“A Brief History of the Life and Labours of the Rev. T. Charles, A.B., Late of Bala, Merionethshire.” Imperial Magazine, 11, no. 130: (October 1829): 947.
        The reviewer commends biographer Rev. Thomas Morgan ’s commitment to the primary sources in his 1828 book, not to mention his devotion to the memory of the subject.
“ESSAY ON HISTORY AND THE PROGRESS OF SOCIETY,.” Imperial Magazine, 11, no. 131: (November 1829): 997–1001.
        This article attempts to discuss humankind in all ages, in all countries, in all situations, and under a variety of circumstances. The author discusses the rise and fall of certain kingdoms and the different states of society. The states of society include one that was ‘rude and uncultivated,’ followed by ‘rude and warlike’ and finally a state of society which began when a powerful people were possessed of mild and competent laws.
Scott, Walter.“History of Scotland.” Quarterly, 41, no. 82: (November 1829): 328–59.
        The anonymous reviewer (Walter Scott) discourses on the difficulties of writing a marketable history of Scotland and criticizes Tytler for being too hard on his predecessor Lord Hailes, while praising Tytler’s industry and competence. Reviewed: Tytler, Patrick Fraser. History of Scotland. Vol. I and II. 1829. {attribution Wellesley Index}See also review of Vol 7, 1841.
“THOUGHTS ON A CONTINUATION OF WHARTON’S HISTORY OF ENGLISH POETRY.” Imperial Magazine, 11, no. 131: (November 1829): 1013–14.
        The author discusses the progression of literary style in poetry including the use of the lyric.
“Historical Miscellany, or Illustrations of the Most Important Periods in Ancient and Modern History, &c. &c.” Imperial Magazine, 11, no. 132: (December 1829): 1117–18.
        Examines W. C. Taylor’s 1829 work designed for use in schools to teach ancient history. Examines its content and commends its structure and usefulness in aiding learning.
“A Portrait of John the Baptist, or an Illustration of His History and Doctrine.” Imperial Magazine, 12, no. 135: (March 1830): 289–90.
        States this 1830 book by Henry Belfrage is useful as a tool for history and also as a work that promotes moral values.
“Conversations upon Comparative Chronology and General History,.” Imperial Magazine, 12, no. 137: (May 1830): 467–68.
        States that although this 1830 work covering the creation of the world to the birth of Christ is well-written, its question-and-answer style is problematic in presenting a clear history to its targeted youth audience, although it may be entertaining for adult readers.
“THE PRACTICAL USES OF HISTORY.” Imperial Magazine, 12, no. 137: (May 1830): 435–36.
        The author states that moral and intellectual improvement can result from the study of recorded history.
“A Comprehensive Grammar of Sacred Geography and History,.” Imperial Magazine, 12, no. 141: (September 1830): 861.
        States William Pinnock’s book, targeted at educating young students, offers useful information, demonstrates useful illustrations and has a beneficial structure.
Carlyle, Thomas.“THOUGHTS ON HISTORY.” Fraser’s Magazine, 2, no. 10: (November 1830): 413–18.
        This article discusses historical philosophy and characterizes history as philosophy teaching by experience; this experience must be intelligibly recorded. A brief discussion of the different types of history is also incorporated: the history of medicine, politics, church history, astronomy, etc. (Attribution: Wellesley Index).
“The History and Topography of the United States of North America, from the Earliest Period to the Present Time.” Imperial Magazine, 1, no. 2: (February 1831): 91–93.
        Mainly discusses what is contained in parts 7 to 12 (1832) of John Howard Hinton’s book , providing a chapter-by-chapter explanation . Notes areas given too much coverage, or not enough, and also offers historical context for the work being examined.
“The History of Chemistry.” Imperial Magazine, 1, no. 4: (April 1831): 193–94.
        States that Thomas Thomson’s book is well-written, unbiased, and overall well done.
“The History of Chivalry.” Imperial Magazine, 1, no. 4: (April 1831): 194.
        States that G.P.R. James’s 1830 book is entertaining but is not very useful in academic terms.
“The History of the Bible.” Imperial Magazine, 1, no. 4: (April 1831): 190–91.
        States that although not much new information is ever expected from a Bible history, this 1831 work by Rev. G. R. Gleig offers a useful account and presents a good argument with solid source material.
“HISTORY OF NAVIGATION.” Imperial Magazine, 1, no. 5: (May 1831): 226–30.
        This article traces the origins of navigation, going back to the time of Noah. Other examples of navigation, by figures such as the Argonauts, Odysseus the Phoenicians, are among the examples offered.
“The History and Topography of the United States of America, with a Series of Views, Parts 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12.” Imperial Magazine, 1, no. 6: (June 1831): 284.
        States the work by John Howard Hinton is well illustrated, uses excellent sources, and is an overall excellent addition to previous editions and is well done. This review covers parts 7-12, published 1831.
Williams, John.“Outlines of History.” Quarterly, 45, no. 90: (July 1831): 450–71.
        Comments on political and historical change, with very little reference to the work ostensibly under review. Reviewed: Outlines of History. 1830. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“The History of the Church of Christ, in Continuation of Milner, &c.” Imperial Magazine, 1, no. 7: (July 1831): 335–36.
        Examines third volume (1831) of Scott’s continuation of Milner’s history of the church, offering excerpts and insight into the usefulness and relevance of the work’s content.
“The History of the Reformation of Religion in Scotland.” Imperial Magazine, 1, no. 7: (July 1831): 333–34.
        Discusses the content of William McGavin’s 1831 compilation of Knox’s writings; states that it does an excellent job of immortalizing the work.
“The History and Topography of the United States of North America.” Imperial Magazine, 1, no. 8: (August 1831): 388.
        This review of parts 13-15, published 1831, mainly focuses on the value and attractiveness of the plates used in John Howard’s work to discuss U.S history and topography.
“The History of the County Palatine of Lancaster.” Imperial Magazine, 1, no. 8: (August 1831): 383–84.
        Praises the physical elegance of the 1831 book by Edward Baines, the illustrations, and the value and presentation of the information.
“Ecclesiastical History,.” Imperial Magazine, 1, no. 9: (September 1831): 429–30.
        States that William Jones’s 1831 work will be useful and entertaining to all readers, despite its failure to criticize the sources its proves to be erroneous.
“The History and Topography of the United States of North America,.” Imperial Magazine, 1, no. 10: (October 1831): 481–82.
        Discussing parts 16-20 of John Howard Hinton’s book, the reviewer regards the information as well-analyzed and unbiased.
“HISTORY OF NAVIGATION.” Imperial Magazine, 1, no. 12: (December 1831): 561–69.
        Continuing from the May 1831 issue, this article discusses the voyages of the Phoenicians. The author also incorporates information on navigators and discoverers, with remarks on Nearchus, Pytheas and Herodotus.
“The History and Topography of the United States of America.” Imperial Magazine, 2, no. 13: (January 1832): 40.
        This review of parts 21-25 (1831) of John Howard Hinton’s book praises the work for its continued excellence in terms of the illustrated plates and the quality of information. Also notes that the plates in these sections are increasingly well-described , presented in detail and with elegance.
“History of the Jews in All Ages.” Imperial Magazine, 2, no. 16: (April 1832): 188–89.
        Regards this work as credible, concise, entertaining, and useful. Commends the author for in-depth research and for supplying excellent information while avoiding irrelevant details. Anonymous author of this 1832 work identified as ‘The author of “History of all Ages”.’
“Memoir of Sebastian Cabot.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 1, no. 1: (April 1832): 131–32.
        Examines this biography of the son of John Cabot and states that the author does an excellent job with his triumphant and sarcastic tone to examine Cabot’s life. Reviewed: Biddle, Richard. Memoir of Sebastian Cabot, with a Review of the History of Maritime Discovery; illustrated by Documents from the Rolls, now first published. London: Hurst, Chance, & co, 1831.
“The History and Topography of the United States of North America.” Imperial Magazine, 2, no. 16: (April 1832): 190–91.
        Parts 26-30 (1832) of John Howard Hinton’s book, like those before them, are reviewed as useful, interesting and well illustrated.
“CURIOUS HISTORY OF AN EDINBURGH BOY.” Chambers’s, 0, no. 10: (7 April 1832): 74.
        Brief account of the life of John Oswald (1760-1793)- Scottish philosopher, writer, poet, and social critic.
“The History and Prospects of the Church,.” Imperial Magazine, 2, no. 17: (May 1832): 236–37.
        Observes that although this book by James Bennett is not very profound (despite dating ’from the Creation to the Consummation of all things’) it can be useful as a general historical text.
“Church History through All Ages, from the First Promise of a Saviour,.” Imperial Magazine, 2, no. 18: (June 1832): 289–90.
        Describes this 1832 work by Thomas Timpson as diverse, valuable, and a well-made compilation of information. Also offers a summary of content and excerpts.
“Exeter Hall Exhibition of Paintings, Illustrative of Sacred History [by Ancient Masters].” Imperial Magazine, 2, no. 18: (June 1832): 285.
        Critiques the art exhibit at Exeter Hall, with comments on several individual works; regards the exhibit as well-done and entertaining.
Lockhart, J. G.“History of the War of the Succession in Spain.” Quarterly, 47, no. 94: (July 1832): 519–37.
        Opens with an acknowledgement of Stanhope family involvement in the war in question; and closes with praise for the author’s skills as a historian. Also notes that manuscript correspondence has survived. Reviewed: Lord Mahon (Philip Henry Stanhope). History of the War of the Succession in Spain. 1832. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“The History and Topography of the United States of North America,.” Imperial Magazine, 2, no. 19: (July 1832): 330.
        Parts 31-40 (1832) of John Howard Hinton’s work continue to display attention to detail and contain excellent illustrations as well as intelligent and useful information.
“History of the Seven Churches of Asia,.” Imperial Magazine, 2, no. 20: (August 1832): 382–83.
        Judges this 1832 work by the Rev. T. Milner to be one of the most useful and interesting books on the topic, which is ‘designed to show the fulfilment of Prophecy.’
“A Companion and Key to the History of England--Genealogical Details of British Sovereigns, Alliances, Families, Titles, Armorial Bearings, Charts, &c. &c.” Imperial Magazine, 2, no. 21: (September 1832): 430–31.
        Although this 1832 book by George Fisher lacks proper references (which brings its validity into question), the reviewer notes that it is full of useful information and will be of use to many generations to come.
“History and Character of American Revivals of Religion.” Imperial Magazine, 2, no. 21: (September 1832): 428–29.
        The review presents a summary of the content and theories found in this 1832 book by the Rev Calvin Colton.
Heraud, John Abraham.“SACRED HISTORY OF THE WORLD. Vol 1.” Fraser’s Magazine, 6, no. 33: (October 1832): 329–41.
        Reviews the second edition of Sharon Turner’s Sacred History of the World (published Longman 1832). Throughout this article is a discussion of religion and natural history. Also discussed is the creation of plant life, animals and man according to religious history. (Attribution: Wellesley Index).
“The History of Charlemagne;” Imperial Magazine, 2, no. 22: (October 1832): 485.
        The review offers a brief overview of Charlemagne and his accomplishments and states that G. P. R. James’s 1832 book is a good biography which also offers useful contextual material on French history.
“POPULAR INFORMATION ON HISTORY.” Chambers’s, 0, no. 41: (11 October 1832): 322–23.
        Brief history of the Jewish people and their faith.
“EXTRAORDINARY HISTORY OF WILLIAM FRASER.” Chambers’s, 0, no. 39: (17 October 1832): 308.
        Brief biography of a Scottish boy genius of the late eighteenth century; his life and premature death.
“HISTORY OF THE VIOLIN.” Chambers’s, 0, no. 39: (17 October 1832): 309.
        A brief piece on the history of the violin from 1514 to the nineteenth century.
“POPULAR INFORMATION ON HISTORY.” Chambers’s, 0, no. 40: (3 November 1832): 317–18.
        Brief history of ancient Egypt: mainly focused on the people and the culture.
“The Sacred History of the World.” Chambers’s, 0, no. 43: (24 November 1832): 341–42.
        Focuses on Sharon Turner’s book, by introducing its subject-matter; praises the book for its content and its usefulness to young readers and then offers a lengthy excerpt.
Milman, H. H.“The History of Charlemagne.” Quarterly, 48, no. 96: (December 1832): 421–55.
        Discusses the period as a turning-point for Europe. Noting that the author intends this as first of a series on the great men of France, the reviewer (Milman) criticizes the concept and observes that James has written at too great length. Reviewed: James, G. P. R. The History of Charlemagne. 1832. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“The Record of Providence; or, the Government of God Displayed in a Series of Interesting Facts from Sacred and Profane History.” Imperial Magazine, 2, no. 24: (December 1832): 580–81.
        Regards this 1832 book by the Rev. J. Young, the first on its subject, as well-organized, well-sourced, and interesting. States that it will be useful to readers of all ages.
“POPULAR INFORMATION ON HISTORY.” Chambers’s, 0, no. 45: (8 December 1832): 354–55.
        Brief history of the Ancient Greeks: the rulers, the culture, the military campaigns.
“EXTRAORDINARY HISTORY OF MR THOMAS JENKINS.” Chambers’s, 0, no. 46: (15 December 1832): 361–62.
        A discussion of the life and accomplishments of Thomas Jenkins, son of an African king, sent to live and be educated in Scotland, later went to Mauritius as a missionary.
“POPULAR INFORMATION ON HISTORY.” Chambers’s, 0, no. 46: (15 December 1832): 366–67.
        Brief history of Ancient Athens and Sparta: battles, culture, and people.
“POPULAR INFORMATION ON HISTORY.” Chambers’s, 0, no. 48: (29 December 1832): 378–80.
        Brief history of the Turks: the people (their origin), rulers, Ottoman Empire.
“POPULAR INFORMATION ON HISTORY.” Chambers’s, 0, no. 51: (19 January 1833): 401–2.
        The Romans, part 1.
“POPULAR INFORMATION ON HISTORY.” Chambers’s, 0, no. 52: (26 January 1833): 411–12.
        The Romans , part 2.
Johnstone, Christian Isobel, Thomas Doubleday, and J. J. Darling.“Biographical History of the Wesley Family.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 2, no. 11: (February 1833): 674.
        Brief notice states that this work is well done, offering interesting information on the founders of the American Methodist church. Reviewed: Dove, John. Biographical History of the Wesley Family.
“HISTORY OF DOMESTIC THINGS.” Chambers’s, 2, no. 53: (2 February 1833): 7–8.
        Brief history of the origin and use of forks, toothpicks, horse-drawn coaches, and tobacco.
“POPULAR INFORMATION ON HISTORY.” Chambers’s, 2, no. 56: (23 February 1833): 26–27.
        The Romans, part 3.
“POPULAR INFORMATION ON HISTORY.” Chambers’s, 2, no. 59: (16 March 1833): 49–51.
        The Romans, part 4.
“POPULAR INFORMATION ON HISTORY.” Chambers’s, 2, no. 61: (30 March 1833): 66–67.
        The Romans, part 5 (Constantinople).
“A Biographical History of the Wesley Family, More Particularly Its Earlier Branches.” Imperial Magazine, 3, no. 29: (May 1833): 246.
        John Dove’s 1833 study is judged well done in that it is well-arranged, moderately priced and of overall utility.
“A PASSAGE IN THE HISTORY OF SOUTH AMERICAN INDEPENDENCE.” Chambers’s, 2, no. 75: (7 June 1833): 178–80.
        The adventures of a fleet of British seaman off the coast of Peru during the War of Independence in South America around 1818. Details the tribulations the fleet faced, a detailed description of their capture of the Spanish sea vessel Minerva and the spoils and riches they obtained upon victory.
“History of Europe during the French Revolution.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 3, no. 16: (July 1833): 496–510.
        States that this work is eloquent, interesting, very descriptive and overall well done. It does point out some specific things that Alison left out and some opinions about the politics of the revolution that the reviewer did not agree with. The review contains a description of the work with excerpts as well. Reviewed: Alison, Archibald. Embracing the Period from the Assembly of the Notables, in 1789, to the Establishment of the Directory, in 1795. Edinburgh: William Blackwood & London: T. Cadell and Stand, 1833.
“The History of Dissenters from the Revolution to the Year 1808.” Imperial Magazine, 3, no. 32: (August 1833): 371–75.
        The review of this 1833 second edition of David Bogue’s and James Bennet’s book offers a detailed historical context for the work as well as a lengthy summary of the content, including excerpts.
“A Popular History of Priestcraft in All Ages and Nations.” Imperial Magazine, 3, no. 33: (September 1833): 430–31.
        The review states that William Howitt’s 1833 book is very controversial; it must be read by people of all religious beliefs.
“English History for the People of England.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 3, no. 18: (September 1833): 809.
        The design of the work is praiseworthy and the overall idea of the work good. Reviewed: English History for the People of England. London: Cambridge, Heward.
“PEDESTRIAN TOURS IN SWITZERLAND.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 3, no. 18: (September 1833): 805–6.
        States that although this work offers readers a pleasant voyage through the Swiss hills with journal entries it is not very informative and skips the history of Switzerland. Reviewed: Agassiz, L. PEDESTRIAN TOURS IN SWITZERLAND, with a Sketch of its History and of the Manners and Customs. London: Smith, Elder & co.
“HISTORY OF THE ASSASSINS.” Chambers’s, 2, no. 80: (19 September 1833): 219–20.
        Focuses on the history of the secret society of assassins which originated in Persia. Discusses the origins of the group, of the name ‘assassin’, members of the society over time, their social class, and some of the campaigns they carried out.
“Taylor’s History of the Civil Wars in Ireland, from the Anglo- Norman Invasion Till the Union of the Country with Great Britain.” Fraser’s Magazine, 8, no. 46: (October 1833): 385–95.
        Author is W.C. Taylor; book published 1831.
Dumas, Alexandre.“Philosophy of French History.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 4, no. 21: (December 1833): 341–42.
        Briefly offers extracts and examines various events in French history, mostly of the early nineteenth century (the book is judged not very useful).
“The History of Wales.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 4, no. 22: (January 1834): 506.
        Claims this is a useful little work (very brief review). Reviewed: ‘By a Welsh Lady’ The History of Wales: Arranged as a Cathecism. Shrewsbury: Eddowses.
“POPULAR INFORMATION ON ROMAN HISTORY.” Chambers’s, 2, no. 102: (11 January 1834): 394–95.
        A brief discussion of the games and leisure activities of the ancient Romans, including chariot races, circus, gladiatorial games, and plays. Discusses the details of the events, the venues, participants, and spectators.
“Edinburgh Cabinet Library; History of Arabia, Ancient and Modern, &c. &c.” Imperial Magazine, 4, no. 38: (February 1834): 94–96.
        Review ends with a recommendation, but mainly consists of a summary of Andrew Crichton’s 1833 work, including many excerpts.
Reynolds, John Hamilton.“HINTS FOR A HISTORY OF HIGHWAYMEN.” Fraser’s Magazine, 9, no. 51: (March 1834): 279–87.
        This article discusses highwaymen and other criminals and suggests that a full history of English highwaymen should be written. Discussed are people such as Robin Hood, Jenny Diver, Nathaniel Hawes and Major George Strangwayes. {attribution Curran Index}.
“Lardner’s Cyclopoedia-History of Rome, Vol. I.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 1, no. 2: (March 1834): 135.
        States this work is the best work of Larder thus far in offering readers valuable and original information and recommends it to readers claiming overall it is excellent. Reviewed: Lardner, Thomas. History of Rome, Vol. I. Longman, Rees, and Orme, 1833.
“History of the Presbyterian Church in Ireland.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 0, no. 0: (April 1834): 210.
        States that this valuable work is approached fairly and that this work is an overall important addition to history. Reviewed: Reid, Rev James Seaton. History of the Presbyterian Church in Ireland. Edinburgh: Waugh and Innes.
“The History of Switzerland, from Its Earliest Origin to the Present Time; a Popular Description and Faithful Picture of the Gradual Rise and Progress of the French Nation.” Imperial Magazine, 4, no. 40: (April 1834): 183–84.
        Reviewer states that this book by Heinrich Zschokke (1834) is a comprehensive, complete, instructive, and entertaining history and that it is translated well. It is thus highly recommended to readers of all ages.
“HISTORY OF AN OBSCURE POET.” Chambers’s, 0, no. 116: (19 April 1834): 93–94.
        A brief examination of the life of Stewart Lewis (1756-1818) including a discussion of his youth, family, personality, rise to fame, and excerpts of his poetry.
Johnstone, Christian Isobel.“Sir James Mackintosh’s History of the Revolution of 1688.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 0, no. 0: (May 1834): 247–58.
        This review mainly focuses on the book’s preface regarding the life of Sir James and does not get to reviewing the actual historical portion of the work. The review in discusses the life (private and public) of Mackintosh and states that the work overall is well-written, fair and impartial, yet expensive for a book that spends so much time on the biography of its author. Reviewed: History of the Revolution of 1688. 1834. (complete upon Mackintosh’s death by William Wallace).
Croker, J. W.“History of the Revolution in England in 1688.” Quarterly, 51, no. 102: (June 1834): 493–536.
        Postpones consideration of the author as ‘a mere historian and speculative moralist’ in favour of comparing the revolutions of 1638 and 1832. A footnote mentions that Mackintosh is deceased and the volume was continued by a colleague. The latter has written an unsatisfactory biographical sketch. Reviewed: Mackintosh, James. History of the Revolution in England in 1688. 1834. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“Colonel Napier’s History of the War in the Peninsula.” Imperial Magazine, 4, no. 44: (August 1834): 369–72.
        The reviewer finds Napier’s work (1834) to be well-written, well-sourced, and unbiased. The reviewer then offers a detailed account of the contents.
“Universal History. the Earliest Ages (Vol 1 of 4).” Fraser’s Magazine, 10, no. 56: (August 1834): 210–21.
        Author is Alexander Fraser Tytler (Lord Woodhouselee); published in John Murray’s Family Library.
“WHAT DOES HISTORY TEACH?” Chambers’s, 0, no. 132: (9 August 1834): 221–22.
        An essay on historiography and pedagogy, arguing for teaching history as an enlightened philosophy and exemplary transactions, while downgrading sordid incidents and mere chronology.
“Evening Readings in History;” Imperial Magazine, 4, no. 45: (September 1834): 436.
        States that this 1834 work by Lydia Howard Sigourney is surprisingly well done considering the author’s gender; notes that it is plain and carefully and pleasingly narrated. Reviewer believes it will be beneficial to the school children it is written to educate. Subtitle of the book: Comprising portions of the History of Assyria, Egypt, Tyre, Syria, Persia, and the Sacred Scriptures; with Questions, arranged for the use of Family Circles.
Burton, John Hill.“History of Scotland.-Vol. V.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 1, no. 8: (September 1834): 521–27.
        Reviewer examines the content of past 4 volumes and the content of the present fifth volume. States that while Tytler is a passionate and dedicated researcher and writer he may overvalue or overemphasize the importance of his original findings. Nevertheless, the next volumes are much anticipated. Reviewed: Tytler, Patrick Fraser.  History of Scotland.-Vol. V. (Attribution: Wellesley Index).
“Tytler’s History of Scotland.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 0, no. 0: (September 1834): 354.
        States that the 5th volume of this work is useful as it offers original information as it examines a portion of the reign of James IV and the whole reign of James V. Reviewed: Tytler, Patrick Fraser. History of Scotland.
“HISTORY OF COUNTING.” Chambers’s, 0, no. 144: (1 November 1834): 314–15.
        Beginning with origins in Chinese, Roman, Greek, and German cultures, to the contemporary system of numbers and counting, with detailed discussions of each transition over time.
“Historia Technica Anglicanoe: A Systematic Arrangement of the Leading Events in English History, from the Earliest Notices of the Country to the Present Time: With an Original System of Mnemonics.” Imperial Magazine, 4, no. 48: (December 1834): 564–66.
        Reviewer states that the book by Thomas Rose is a well-done history and applauds its attempt at using Mnemonics as a style of learning.
“Gutzlaff’s Sketch of Chinese History.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 2, no. 13: (January 1835): 44–52.
        States that this work is a useful collection of facts but its utility is limited insofar as it does not present events in appropriate proportion, due to its chronological basis. The reviewers also offers a detailed account of the content of the work. Reviewed: Gutzlaff, Charles. Sketch of Chinese History.
“Private History of the London Newspaper Press.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 1, no. 11: (January 1835): 788–92.
        Examines the evolution of the Newspaper press in London by looking at the divisions of the newspaper medium into many different newspapers and the men involved in this evolutionary process.
“Aikman’s History of Religious Liberty in England.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 2, no. 15: (March 1835): 206.
        States the importance and usefulness of this multi-volume collection, which is broken up into manageable volumes making it cheap, concise, and very useful to all readers. Reviewed: Aikman, James. History of Religious Liberty in England.
“HISTORY OF CORPORATIONS.” Fraser’s Magazine, 11, no. 63: (March 1835): 309–25.
        Review of a History of Boroughs and Municipal Corporations of the United Kingdom, by Henry A. Merewether et al (Stevens & Sons 1835) with comments on Francis Palgrave’s Rise and Progress of the English Commonwealth (John Murray 1832). Discusses the creation of order through individuals or corporations. A main theme is the evolution of law and the groups that have enforced the law. The author discusses law under the Romans, Saxons and the English.
Vivian, George.“A History of Architecture.” Quarterly, 53, no. 106: (April 1835): 338–71.
        Observes that the gentry should show more interest in the subject. The author is described as laborious and accomplished. Reviewed: Hope, Thomas. A History of Architecture. 1835.{attribution Wellesley Index}.
“Baines History of the Cotton Manufacture.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 2, no. 16: (April 1835): 235–52.
        The reviewer states that the author is well equipped for the task of examining the history of cotton manufacturing as he is accurate, impartial, candid, and a dedicated researcher. States that the work is much needed as this industry is of the greatest importance and that this work is overall very interesting. Then goes on to examine the content of the work with many lengthy excerpts. Reviewed: Baines, Edward. History of the Cotton Manufacture.
“Cooper’s Parliamentary History of the Country of Sussex.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 2, no. 17: (May 1835): 351.
        ‘An interesting morsel of county history’ (the content of the entire review is this sentence).
Heraud, John Abraham.“Mr. Sharon Turner’s Sacred History of the World. Vol 2.” Fraser’s Magazine, 11, no. 65: (May 1835): 497–507.
        Book published 1834.  (Attribution: Wellesley Index).
“Scenes and Legends of the North of Scotland.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 2, no. 17: (May 1835): 350.
        States that this work is interesting, clever, entertaining, well-written, contains original and valuable information. Reviewed: Miller, Hugh. Scenes and Legends of the North of Scotland, or the Traditional History of Cromarty. Edinburgh: Adam & Charles Black).
“History and Present Condition of the Barbury States.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 2, no. 18: (June 1835): 419–20.
        States this work is full of valuable and interesting information and contains well-done and useful engravings. Reviewed: Russell, Rev. Michael. History and Present Condition of the Barbury States.
“A History and Description of the Late Houses of Parliament.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 2, no. 19: (July 1835): 487.
        Simply states that engravings are bold and clever.
Egerton, Francis and H. H. Milman.“History of the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries, Illustrated by Original Documents.” Quarterly, 54, no. 107: (July 1835): 78–108.
        Comments on the author’s other work, and on the difficulties of working with undigested primary documents. Praise for von Raumer’s ‘impartial and scrutinizing spirit’. Reviewed: von Raumer, Fredric. History of the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries, illustrated by original documents. trans. Lord Francis Egerton. 1835.  {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“Chronological Tables of Ancient History.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 2, no. 20: (August 1835): 554.
        States that the tables are copious and complete and the work is of immense use to ‘instructors of youth’ and for older readers as its mass of historical facts can be useful.
“Moore’s History of Ireland-Cabinet Cyclopaedia.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 2, no. 17: (August 1835): 349.
        States that Thomas Moore, generally considered a poet, has gone beyond his title and done an effective job of presenting this history. Offers content and excerpts from the work.
“The History of the Assassins.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 2, no. 20: (August 1835): 554.
        Contents are amusing and useful. Reviewed: Hammer, M. Von. The History of the Assassins. Trans. Oswald Charles Wood.
“SCOTTISH ECCLESIASTICAL HISTORY.” Fraser’s Magazine, 12, no. 72: (December 1835): 651–64.
        The author argues that ecclesiastical history is not a very inviting subject of study and that ‘not one man in a hundred, even of those who are presumed to be well read, knows any thing at all about the matter.’ The author gives an ecclesiastical history of Scotland, beginning with the period of ‘Romish domination’. Issues of concern are the Reformation, religious persecution and Episcopacy which ended in 1688.
“The Philosophy of History.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 2, no. 24: (December 1835): 828.
        Scan is illegible. Reviewed: Schlegel, Fredrick Von. The Philosophy of History. London: Saunders & Otley.
“TRADITIONARY HISTORY OF ALASTER MAC COL.” Chambers’s, 0, no. 203: (19 December 1835): 373–74.
        Biography of a Scottish soldier in the royalist army (c1610-1647); includes a discussion of his youth, his rise to commander, and a detailed evaluation of his participation in the civil war.
Johnstone, Christian Isobel.“Hogarth’s History of Music.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 3, no. 26: (February 1836): 80–87.
        States that Hogarth is impartial and selects good information to include in this useful, delightful, and sound work. To know the book is to appreciate it. Publisher is Parker.
“Knickerbocker’s History of New York.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 3, no. 27: (March 1836): 201.
        The original work is praised, and this new edition is notable for useful and competent illustrations.
Croker, J. W. and George Murray.“History of the War in the Peninsula and the South of France, from the Year 1807 to the Year 1814.” Quarterly, 56, no. 111: (April 1836): 131–219.
        First of four reviews of this work (now 4 vol.) although first volume appeared 8 years ago Compares this work favourably to ‘literary productions of a lighter and more ephemeral nature. The stream of historical knowledge belongs to posterity as well as to the existing generation, and it is one amongst the many important duties of criticism to watch with especial care against its pollution at the fountain-head.’ Expresses concern over various judgments on Napier’s part. Reviewed: Napier, W.F.P. History of the War in the Peninsula and the South of France, from the Year 1807 to the Year 1814. 1828-1834.{attribution Wellesley Index}.
Michael Joseph.“Musical History, Biography, and Criticism: Being a General Survey of Music, from the Earliest Period to the Present Time.” Dublin Review, 1, no. 1: (May 1836): 100–131.
        Author is George Hogarth; book published 1835. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Murray, George and J. W. Croker.“History of the War in the Peninsula, &c.” Quarterly, 56, no. 112: (June 1836): 437–89.
        Second article, here commenting on the third volume of the 4-volume work. Continues critique in terms of party bias, partiality to the French and against the Spaniards, and distortion of facts. Reviewed: Napier, W.F.P. History of the War in the Peninsula. 1835. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“Wallen’s History of the Round Church at Little Mapplestead.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 3, no. 30: (June 1836): 409.
        This ‘curious and pleasant’ work is a ‘good epitome of the history of the crusaders’.
“Armitag ’s History of Brazil.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 3, no. 31: (July 1836): 472.
        ProQuest scan is illegible.
“Admiral Napier’s History of the War in Portugal.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 3, no. 33: (September 1836): 610–11.
        Notes that this interesting and useful work is useful not only as a personal narrative, but also as a source of useful insight into the political Cabinet of the time.
Burton, John Hill.“Gregory’s History of the Western Highlands and Isles of Scotland.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 3, no. 33: (September 1836): 574–89.
        States that Gregory’s closer connection to his topic has benefitted the book, and resulted in a work full of useful information that is an ‘essential service’. (Attribution: Wellesley Index).
McSkimmin, Samuel.“SECRET HISTORY OF THE IRISH INSURRECTION OF 1803.” Fraser’s Magazine, 14, no. 83: (November 1836): 546–67.
        Article offers information that goes beyond a numerical account of those who died during this event, beginning with events that occurred before the insurrection; a plot for liberation was in the works in the autumn of 1798. Also discussed are those involved, including Thomas Russel, William Dowdall and William Hamilton. The tactics and fate of these men are also discussed. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“Wheeler’s History of Manchester.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 3, no. 35: (November 1836): 752.
        Notes that this work is useful and contains interesting statistics and information; however the author attempts to appear dispassionate and impartial, but his political views are not very well masked.
Lockhart, J. G.“History of England from the Peace of Utrecht to the Peace of Aix-La-Chapelle.” Quarterly, 57, no. 114: (December 1836): 330–49.
        Asserts that the subject is ‘the most instructive and interesting chapter in that of the human race’. Examines and reviews Lord Mahon’s (Philip Henry Stanhope’s) 1836 work (eventually titled: History of England from the Peace of Utrecht to the Peace of Versailles). Discusses the content of the work, its merits and the sources used, and offers an overall evaluation. Reviewed: Lord Mahon. History of England from the Peace of Utrecht to the Peace of Aix-la-Chapelle. vol. I. 1836. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Wiseman, Nicholas (Cardinal).“Materials for the Ecclesiastical History of Germany in the Nineteenth Century.” Dublin Review, 2, no. 3: (December 1836): 168–86.
        Examines this work dedicated to the history of Catholics and Protestants in Germany in the 19th century by mainly focusing on the content of the work. Original title is Beitrage zur Kirchengeschichte des neunzehnten Jahrhunderts in Deutschland. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Murray, George and J. W. Croker.“Napier’s History of the War in the Peninsula.” Quarterly, 57, no. 114: (December 1836): 492–542.
        Third article on Napier’s book; includes the recently appeared 5th volume. That volume includes an ‘Answer to Some Attacks in the Quarterly Review’, which the reviewers characterize in terms of ‘flippancy, want of temper and, above all, want of candour’. Reviewed: Napier, W.F.P. Napier’s History of the War in the Peninsula. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Groves, Edward C.“The Case of Maynooth College Considered, with a History of the First Establishment of That Seminary; an Account of the System of Education Pursued in It; and a Review of the Effect It Has Had on the Character of the Roman Catholic Clergy of Ireland.” Dublin Review, 2, no. 3: (December 1836): 129–68.
        Examines the content and merit of several works dedicated to the history of Maynooth College in Ireland. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Burton, John Hill.“History of the Church of Scotland, in Relation to Endowments; by Alexander Fyfe, Surgeon.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 4, no. 37: (January 1837): 17–23.
        Notes that this well compiled historical work is honest and contains good, and often startling, information. (Attribution: Wellesley Index).
Johnstone, Christian Isobel.“New Lights Thrown, by M. Von Raumer, on the Private and Personal History of Queen Elizabeth and Mary Queen of Scots.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 4, no. 38: (February 1837): 118–25.
        Notes that this work contains interesting and entertaining content, but that Raumer may not have been entirely impartial as he clearly sides with Elizabeth. Reviewed: Raumer, M. Von. Contributions to Modern History.
Doubleday, Thomas.“The History of England Made Visible.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 4, no. 38: (February 1837): 128.
        Notes that this work is entertaining and instructive, with its many illustrations. Reviewed: Williams, Charles. The History of England Made Visible. London: Westley & Davis.
“In History and Biography,.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 4, no. 41: (May 1837): 332.
        States that this work is one of the most interesting works on the subject. Reviewed: Tytler, Patrick Fraser. Life of Henry VIII.
Smith, James.“A History of England from the Invasion of the Romans (Vol 1, 4th Ed).” Dublin Review, 3, no. 5: (July 1837): 273–74.
        Regard’s John Lingard’s book as valuable, accurate, and impartial and states that the additions made to the fourth edition make this wonderful historical work even more useful and important as the ‘only history of England.’ Publisher is Baldwin and Craddock. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
O’Connell, John.“History of Ireland.” Dublin Review, 3, no. 5: (July 1837): 15–43.
        A general review of the works of several scholars, including excerpts as well as descriptions of content. Discusses the interaction between the British and the Irish as well as the trade, manufacturing, agriculture, and people of Ireland. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“The Highlanders of Scotland-Their Origin, History, and Antiquities.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 4, no. 44: (August 1837): 531–32.
        Judges that this work is very unflattering to its subjects. Reviewed: Skene, William F. The Highlanders of Scotland-their Origin, History, and Antiquities.
“Dr Lang’s History of New South Wales.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 4, no. 45: (September 1837): 600.
        States that this second edition is enlarged and improved.
Anstey, Thomas Chisholm.“Geschichte Der Vorlaufer Der Reformation. History of the Forerunners of the Reformation.” Dublin Review, 3, no. 6: (October 1837): 325–59.
        This review uses several different works about the Reformation to try to discredit the connection between the Protestants, the Waldenses, and SS. Paul and James. Uses content, excerpts and the Catholic view of the situation to attempt to discredit these affiliations. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Burton, John Hill.“Tytler’s History of Scotland.-Vol. VI.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 4, no. 48: (December 1837): 769–80.
        States that that the fulness and accuracy of this work makes it one of the best on the subject, and that Tytler’s use of original documents (which allows him to shed new light on well-known issues) allows him to surpass the works of many past historians’ works on the subject. Reviewed: Tytler, Patrick Fraser. History of Scotland. Vol. VI. (Attribution: Wellesley Index).
Murray, George and J. W. Croker.“History of the War in the Peninsula, &c.” Quarterly, 61, no. 121: (January 1838): 51–96.
        Fourth article, which continues the critique and insists it is important not to abandon the task. Reviewed: Napier, William. History of the War in the Peninsula. article IV.  {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“Burke’s Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Commons of Great Britain and Ireland.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 5, no. 50: (February 1838): 131.
        States that this ‘amusing and curious’ work is both interesting and valuable.
“The Family Library, No. LXIV. A History of the Bastile and of the Principal Captives.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 5, no. 51: (March 1838): 196.
        Review judges this to be a very curious and interesting work.
“Oaths; Their Origin, Nature, and History.” Quarterly, 61, no. 122: (April 1838): 390–425.
        Moderate review: author is ‘good and conscientious’ but does not offer anything new, and the historical sketch is incomplete. Reviewed: Tyler, James Endell. Oaths; their Origin, Nature, and History. 1834. (No attribution in Wellesley Index).
“Railroads: Their Past History, Present Condition, and Future Prospects.” Fraser’s Magazine, 17, no. 100: (April 1838): 421–32.
        First of two parts looks at the past of railways in Great Britain, focusing mostly on construction techniques. Second part in the July issue concerns contemporary matters.
Croker, J. W.“Secret History of the Court of England from the Accession of George III. to the Death of George IV.; Including, amongst Other Important Matters, Full Particulars of the Mysterious Death of the Princess Charlotte.” Quarterly, 61, no. 122: (April 1838): 425–27.
        ‘We notice another infamous publication’ -- not by the lady of rank whose name is on the title page, but by ‘an anonymous slanderer’ who ‘imputes his wretched libels’ to her. Reviewed: Hamilton, Lady Anne [sic]. Secret History of the Court of England from the Accession of George III. to the Death of George IV.; including, amongst other important Matters, full Particulars of the Mysterious Death of the Princess Charlotte. 1832[?]. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“POSTHUMOUS HISTORY OF A ROYALIST CHIEF.” Chambers’s, 0, no. 336: (7 July 1838): 185–86.
        The story of the death and prolonged funeral of the Marquis of Montrose in seventeenth-century Scotland.
“An Epitome of the History and Geography of Greece.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 5, no. 58: (October 1838): 673.
        The reviewer states that, although he did not read much of the work, it seemed pleasing to the eye and would be beneficial for any classics teacher who might chose to look at it more closely. Reviewed: Carr, Thomas Swinburne. An Epitome of the History and Geography of Greece.
Tytler, Patrick Fraser.“Contributions to Modern History. From the British Museum and the State Paper Office.” Quarterly, 62, no. 124: (October 1838): 452–75.
        While celebrating the value of research in the private papers of great men, the reviewer decries the waste of taxpayers’ money on the publication of the Rolls Series and other government papers. The work under review is described as ‘a failure’. Reviewed: von Raumer, Fredrick. Contributions to Modern History. From the British Museum and the State Paper Office. 1836.{attribution Wellesley Index}.
Anstey, Thomas Chisholm.“The French Revolution, A History, in Three Volumes.” Dublin Review, 5, no. 10: (October 1838): 349–76.
        Discusses the work of Thomas Carlyle on the French Revolution and provides excerpts. Offers some minor criticisms, but overall notes that Carlyle has shed light on the causes and sequence of events of the Revolution. Also spends sometime discussing Carlyle’s character and methods. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Blunt, J. J.“The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire.” Quarterly, 62, no. 124: (October 1838): 360–85.
        This new edition of Gibbon includes notes by the historian the Rev. H. H. Milman, whose objective has been to correct the ‘defect’ of Gibbon’s ‘infidel principles’ which have undoubtedly unsettled numerous immature minds. The anonymous reviewer (Blunt) thinks that a preliminary essay might have worked better than notes, but are glad to have a safe edition of Gibbon in circulation. Reviewed: Gibbon, Edward. The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire. vol I-IV. 1838. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“Wilson’s History of Christ’s Hospital.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 5, no. 58: (October 1838): 673.
        Notes that this is an interesting new edition.
“POSTHUMOUS HISTORY OF A SAINT.” Chambers’s, 0, no. 361: (29 December 1838): 385–86.
        Biographical article on the sainthood of St. Cuthbert the seventh-century bishop of Lindisfarne (off the coast of Northumberland). Briefly discusses his life and death but focuses more on the pilgrimage of his body throughout the area for worshippers to praise, and the miracles, stories, and trickery connected to the saint over the ensuing decades.
“Ancient Scottish Melodies; from a M.S. of the Reign of James VI.; with an Introductory Inquiry, Illustrative of the History of the Music of Scotland, by William Dauney, Esq.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 6, no. 61: (January 1839): 53–54.
        Notes that the most interesting and valuable part of this work is the collection of music by John Skene which is translated with great care.
Lockhart, J. G.“History of England from the Peace of Utrecht to the Peace of Aix-La-Chapelle.” Quarterly, 63, no. 125: (January 1839): 151–65.
        Subsequent volumes continue the excellence identified in reviewing the first volume, in December 1836. The author shows ‘courage, judgment, and taste . . . so as to give his narrative the picturesqueness of a Memoir, without sacrificing one jot of the real dignity of History.’ Reviewed: Lord Mahon. History of England from the Peace of Utrecht to the Peace of Aix-la-Chapelle. vol. II. 1837. vol. III. 1838.attribution Wellesley Index}.
Tait, William.“Price’s History of Protestant Nonconformity.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 6, no. 61: (January 1839): 56–57.
        States that this second volume may have been published too long after the first to get much notice, but that it is nevertheless complete on a subject of great importance. Contains a lengthy except which is judged to be the best excerpt to appeal to popular taste.
“The History, Rise, and Progress of the New Colony of South Australia.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 6, no. 63: (March 1839): 195.
        Notes that although the author takes a more sober tone in this second edition he is somewhat biased in focusing more on certain areas of Australia than on others. Reviewed: Stephens, John. The History, Rise, and Progress of the New Colony of South Australia. 2nd ed.
Darling, James Johnston.“Tooke’s History of Prices, and of the State of the Circulation from 1793 to 1837.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 6, no. 63: (March 1839): 153–56.
        States that this edition is enlarged and improved and recommends the work for those who have broader questions about matters pertaining to currency. Reviewed: Tooke, Thomas. A History of Prices, and of the State of the Circulation from 1793 to 1837; preceded by a Brief Sketch of the state of the Corn Trade in the last two centuries. London: Longman & co.
“Ellis’s History of Madagascar.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 6, no. 64: (April 1839): 221–37.
        States that this is the finest work done on the history of the Island and that engravings are accurate. Includes a summary of the content and offers various excerpts. Reviewed: Ellis. History of Madagascar. Fisher, Son & co.
“Pictorial History of Napoleon.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 6, no. 64: (April 1839): 278.
        States that Part 1 of this compilation of works about Napoleon is well put together, detailed and contains good engravings. Reviewed: Pictorial History of Napoleon. ed. R.H Horne.
Lingard, John.“Dodd’s Church History of England, from the Commencement of the Sixteenth Century to the Revolution in 1688, with Notes, Additions, and a Continuation (Vol 1, New Edition).” Dublin Review, 6, no. 12: (May 1839): 395–415.
        Examines the Rev. M. A. Tierney’s new edition of Charles Dodd’s book (dedicated to the Church from the birth of Jesus to the death of Henry VIII) by looking at the author himself (his life and writing style), the content of the work, and the merit of the additions made by Tierney. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“The Pictorial History of Napoleon.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 6, no. 65: (May 1839): 345.
        Reiterates that this work is full of character and has many engravings. Reviewed: The Pictorial History of Napoleon. Part II. ed. R.H. Horne.
Ford, Richard.“History of the Reign of Ferdinand and Isabella the Catholic of Spain.” Quarterly, 64, no. 127: (June 1839): 1–58.
        Observes that the subject has been hitherto neglected; welcomes the contribution of an American author to English literature. Reviewed: Prescott, William. History of the Reign of Ferdinand and Isabella the Catholic of Spain. 1838. attribution Wellesley Index}.
“Chronicle of the Law Officers of Ireland, with an Outline of the Legal History of Ireland, Chronological Tables, &c., &c.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 6, no. 67: (July 1839): 480.
        States that this work will be of value only to those in the profession and specifically to young lawyers. Reviewed: Senyth, Constantine B. Chronicle of the Law Officers of Ireland, with an Outline of the Legal History of Ireland, Chronological Tables.
“History of the Dukes of Normandy, from the Time of Rollo to the Expulsion of King John.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 6, no. 67: (July 1839): 474.
        States that this work is vague and limited; does not explore Norman literature or the state of the arts as much as would be desired. Reviewed: Duncan, Johnathan. History of the Dukes of Normandy, from the Time of Rollo to the Expulsion of King John.
Urlichs, Karl Ludwig.“History of Rome.” Dublin Review, 7, no. 13: (August 1839): 69–98.
        Examines Thomas Arnold’s book, with little attention to the other two books listed for review. Focuses on the content of Arnold’s history, comparing it to the work of other scholars who focused on the same subject. States that Arnold’s work is sincere and candid and one of the best works on the subject. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“WADE’S BRITISH HISTORY.” Chambers’s, 0, no. 395: (24 August 1839): 245.
        Laudatory review of, and lengthy excerpt from, John Wade’s British History Chronologically Arranged, concerning the progress of the railway from the late eighteenth to the nineteenth century. Briefly discusses acts of Parliament concerning railways from 1801 to 1837, the cost of constructing railways, the new uses for railways, and the innovations that took place in creating locomotive carriages.
“British History, from the Invasion of the Romans to the Accession of Queen Victoria.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 6, no. 69: (September 1839): 617.
        States that although this work could be improved, there is no other book that can take its place in terms of information. Reviewed: Wade, John. British History, from the Invasion of the Romans to the Accession of Queen Victoria.
“The Rhine-Legends, Traditions, and History.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 6, no. 70: (October 1839): 691.
        States that this work is wonderful; a complete collection of the lore and history behind every village and town of the Rhine, and that is can best be described as a prose epic. Reviewed: Snowe, Joseph. The Rhine-Legends, Traditions, and History.
“History of the Campaign in France in 1814.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 6, no. 71: (November 1839): 761–62.
        Notes that this work glorifies the Russian army throughout and would thus not be likely to offend any Russian Emperor, past, present, or future. Reviewed: Mikhailofsky-Danielefsky, A. History of the Campaign in France in 1814.
Burgon, J. W.“England under the Reigns of Edward VI. and Mary, with the Contemporary History of Europe, Illustrated in a Series of Original Letters Never before Printed. With Historical Introductions, and Biographical and Critical Notes.” Quarterly, 65, no. 129: (December 1839): 52–76.
        Comments on the ‘indistinctness’ common to much historical writing in comparison to the value of archival research. Tytler has pulled together original documents. Reviewed: Tytler, Patrick Fraser. England under the Reigns of Edward VI. and Mary, with the contemporary History of Europe, illustrated in a series of Original Letters never before printed. With Historical Introductions, and Biographical and Critical Notes. 1839. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“Thornton’s Chapters on the Modern History of India.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 7, no. 73: (January 1840): 62–63.
        States that the author may have used too much of a European framework to analyze India.
“The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire.” Dublin Review, 8, no. 15: (February 1840): 189–220.
        Examines Edward Gibbon’s book , partly by looking at the merits of its content but also by providing details of Gibbon’s life and the background to his history-writing. Book published 1838. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“History of Napoleon.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 7, no. 76: (April 1840): 268.
        With respect to part 13, notes that this work is oversupplied with illustrations on the same subject which create repetition. Reviewed: Tyre. History of Napoleon. Part 13.
“Bodin’s Summary of the History of England.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 7, no. 77: (May 1840): 339.
        States that this work is useful to English readers as it offers a new perspective on English history from a non-native perspective. Reviewed: [Felix] Bodin’s Summary of the History of England. trans. Jonathan Duncan.
“THE HISTORY AND MYSTERY OF SECRET SOCIETIES, AND SECRET POLITICAL CLUBS (1).” Fraser’s Magazine, 21, no. 125: (May 1840): 542–53.
        First of two parts of an article dedicated to researching secret societies from countries all over Europe, including the Illumines in Germany, Die Geisterseher in Sweden, the Rue St. Nicaise in France and the Tungend Bund. Also discussed are questions of how these groups influenced historical events and why they were formed, as well as their various branches of these groups.
“A FEW THOUGHTS ON HISTORY.” Chambers’s, 0, no. 434: (23 May 1840): 137–38.
        Historiographical essay, comparing accounts written by those concerned in events with those drawn from the archival record. Discusses Scott, Hume and others.
Burton, John Hill.“Esther Copley’s History of Slavery and Its Abolition.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 7, no. 78: (June 1840): 399.
        States that this new edition does contain new appendices but does not discuss the new parliamentary developments with regard to slavery. (Attribution: Wellesley Index).
“Milman’s History of Christianity.” Fraser’s Magazine, 21, no. 126: (June 1840): [633]-647.
        Review of Rev. H.H. Milman; The History of Christianity, from the Birth of Christ to the Abolition of Paganism in the Roman Empire (3vols. Published John Murray 1840). The work is characterized as ‘rather a bulky appendix to Gibbon.’
“Ranke’s History of the Popes of the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries.” Fraser’s Magazine, 22, no. 128: (August 1840): [127]-142.
        Unlike slipshod works from modern British authors and publishers, this work by Leopold von Ranke (trans. Sarah Austen; published John Murray 1840) is solid and intends to be fair and impartial, but is unfortunately ‘tainted with the modern leprosy of liberalism’. Reviewer’s perspective is strongly anti-Catholic.
“THE HISTORY AND MYSTERY OF SECRET SOCIETIES AND SECRET POLITICAL CLUBS (2).” Fraser’s Magazine, 22, no. 128: (August 1840): 243–52.
        This article continues from Part 1, discussing the Jacobins and their role in the French Revolution.
“The History of Brechin.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 7, no. 81: (September 1840): 604.
        Claims that Black is just the right man to write this history as he is a town hall official. Reviewed: Black, David. The History of Brechin.
Burton, John Hill.“Tytler’s History of Scotland.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 7, no. 82: (October 1840): [613]-628.
        States that this work is focused one of the most interesting periods of Scottish history; it contains new and authentic facts and is overall well-researched and written. Reviewed: Tytler, Patrick Fraser. History of Scotland. Vol. 6. (Attribution: Wellesley Index).
“The History of the Jews, from the Taking of Jerusalem by Titus to the Present Time.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 7, no. 84: (December 1840): 806.
        States that this work is as much an attempt to convert Jews as it is a history of the Jews.
Stanhope, Philip Henry.“History of Scotland.” Quarterly, 67, no. 134: (1841): [303]-344.
        Reviewer observes that the skills of historical research are seldom found alongside those of analysis. But Tytler shows deep research and sound judgment, with ‘a narrative clear, vigorous, and graphic in its style, accurate and trustworthy in its statements.’ But Stanhope disagrees with Tytler’s reserved opinion about Mary Queen of Scots. Reviewed: Tytler, Patrick Fraser. History of Scotland. vol. VII. 1840. See also review of vols. 1-2, 1829. Attribution Wellesley Index.
“DR. OLIVER’S HISTORY of FREEMASONRY, from 1829 to the PRESENT TIME.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 8, no. 89: (May 1841): 334.
        States that this compilation of new papers is of no great interest.
“THE HISTORY of INITIATION.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 8, no. 89: (May 1841): 334.
        States that this work is amusing especially the part about gothic history. Reviewed: Oliver, Rev. George. The History of Initiation; comprising an Account of the Rite and Ceremonies, Doctrines, and Disciplines, of all the Secret and Mysterious Institutions of the Ancient World.
Herschel, John F. W.“History of the Inductive Sciences from the Earliest to the Present Times.” Quarterly, 68, no. 135: (June 1841): 177–238.
        Comments on the history and philosophy of science and admires Whewell’s work. Reviewed: Whewell, William. History of the Inductive Sciences from the Earliest to the Present Times. 1837. attribution Wellesley Index}.
“General Views of the History and Literature of Italy.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 8, no. 91: (July 1841): 469–70.
        Notes that this work will be useful to foreigners to Italy, offering an understanding of its thought and history. Also states that the chapters on recent history are lacking as they are few and brief. Reviewed: Mariotti, L. General Views of the History and Literature of Italy. Saunders & Otley.
Lockhart, J. G.“History of the Orders of Knighthood of the British Empire; and an Account of the Medals, Crosses, and Clasps Conferred for Naval and Military Services; with a History of the Order of the Guelphs of Hanover.” Quarterly, 68, no. 136: (September 1841): 413–44.
        Describes this as the first comprehensive history of its subject, ‘elaborately prepared and splendidly printed’. Reviewed: Nicolas, Harris. History of the Orders of Knighthood of the British Empire; and an Account of the Medals, Crosses, and Clasps conferred for Naval and Military Services; with a History of the Order of the Guelphs of Hanover. 1839-1840. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Milman, H. H.“The History of India.” Quarterly, 68, no. 136: (September 1841): 377–413.
        The reviewer (historian of Greece H. H. Milman) comments on the need for a brief work and characterizes Elphinstone’s research as ‘profound without being ostentatious.’ Reviewed: Elphinstone, Mountstuart. The History of India. 1841. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“TYTLER’S HISTORY OF SCOTLAND, Volume III.; Containing the Reigns of Robert II. and III.; the Regency of Albany, and the Reign of James I.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 8, no. 93: (September 1841): 610.
        States this volume is a continuation of Tytler’s long career of fine historical research, including the investigation of controversial points.
“Sketches of Scottish Church History.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 8, no. 94: (October 1841): 673–74.
        ProQuest scan is illegible. Reviewed: McCrie, Thomas. Sketches of Scottish Church History.
“Sricenor’s History of the Iron Trade.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 8, no. 94: (October 1841): 674.
        ProQuest scan is illegible.
“The Book of the Bastiles; of, The History of the Working of the New Poor Law.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 8, no. 94: (October 1841): 674.
        ProQuest scan is illegible. Reviewed: Baxter, Wythen. The Book of the Bastiles; of, The History of the Working of the New Poor law.
“Duncan’s History of Guernsey.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 8, no. 95: (November 1841): 734–35.
        Notes that this work is very complete, agreeable, and instructive. Also states that this work is credible to Duncan’s judgement, intelligence and industry. Publisher is Longman & co.
Doubleday, Thomas.“TYTLER’S HISTORY of SCOTLAND, Vol. V.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 8, no. 96: (December 1841): 809.
        States that this work is well-researched, balances conflicting evidence well, and is of overall high authority. In fact, it will restore the value of Scottish history.
“A History of the Life of Richard Coeur-de-Lion.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 9, no. 97: (January 1842): 57.
        States that the work is incomplete as it needs a third volume and thus the reviewer merely points out what was in the introduction, offering no further critique. Reviewed: James, G.P.R. A History of the Life of Richard Coeur-de-Lion. Saunders and Otley.
“The History of the Templars, and the Temple Church, and Temple, London.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 9, no. 97: (January 1842): 56–57.
        ProQuest scan is illegible. Reviewed: Addison, Charles. The History of the Templars, and the Temple Church, and Temple, London. Longman & co.
“The History of the Republic of Texas.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 9, no. 99: (March 1842): 199.
        States that this work is biased and is not recommended to British readers, unless used as a counter argument to the previous work on the topic by ‘Mr. Kennedy’ Reviewed: Doran, N. The History of the Republic of Texas. Smith and Elder.
“The Music of the Church.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 9, no. 99: (March 1842): 196–98.
        Notes that this work is written for a popular audience, comprehensive and full of excellent matter. Recommends this work to all musical readers. Reviewed: Hirst, Thomas. The Music of the Church; containing a General History of Music. Whittaker & co.
McMahon, Patrick.“A History of England, from the First Invasion by the Romans.” Dublin Review, 12, no. 24: (May 1842): 295–354.
        This review of two editions of John Lingard’s work (first published in 8 vols 1819-30; 4th edition 13 vols 1837-9) discusses the merit and content of the book and compares it favourably with other works, notably that of Hume. States that this is the best work on the subject; calm, good tempered, thoughtful, and accurate. Also defends book against criticism of earlier reviewers. Book published 1819-1830. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Burton, John Hill.“Tytler’s History of Scotland.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 9, no. 101: (May 1842): 314–28.
        States that 8th volume is elaborate, comprehensive, accurate, authentic, detailed and uses excellent original sources. Also notes that Tytler does an excellent job of offering a truthful, beautiful, and expressive account of historical characters to ensure that they are viewed as real persons. (Attribution: Wellesley Index).
“History of Christian Missions.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 9, no. 102: (June 1842): 406.
        States that this work is interesting and compiled with pains and ability. Reviewed: Huie, James. History of Christian Missions, from the Reformation to the Present Time. Oliver & Boyd.
“On the Use and Study of History.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 9, no. 102: (June 1842): 406.
        Claims that this set of lectures given at The Theatre of Mechanics Institution in Dublin displays power and freedom of thought and is recommended to young men everywhere. However readers should remember that the author is an Irishman. Specifically commends the second and third lecture in the series. Reviewed: Somers, W. On the Use and Study of History. London: Longman.
Jeffrey, Francis.“On the Use and Study of History.” Dublin Review, 13, no. 25: (August 1842): 252–59.
        States that this series of 6 lectures by W. Torrens McCullagh is patriotic, sympathetic, noble and interesting. Publisher is Machen, of Dublin.
Aytoun, James.“Thornton’s History of British India.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 9, no. 106: (August 1842): 692.
        The book is judged to be valuable with useful information. Vol. III. Part V of Thornton’s work.
“Madden’s History of the United Irishmen.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 9, no. 105: (September 1842): 578–97.
        Although it is noted that this work can be rambling and episodic, it is overall well-researched and authentic, containing original sources.
“TRUE HISTORY OF MACBETH.” Chambers’s, 0, no. 558: (8 October 1842): 303–4.
        Compares the account in Collet’s Relics of Literature to the image of Macbeth presented in Shakespeare’s play. Uses the works of Buchanan and Holinshed, about the history of Scotland and Macbeth, to offer a more accurate account of the life including Macbeth’s family, reign, battles fought, and death.
Quin, Michael Joseph.“History of the Reign of Ferdinand and Isabella, the Catholic, of Spain.” Dublin Review, 13, no. 26: (November 1842): 308–46.
        Offers a detailed discussion of the content of the book by William H. Prescott, with many excerpts. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“NOTES BY A READER OF HISTORY.” Fraser’s Magazine, 26, no. 155: (November 1842): 553–65.
        Forty-two notes commenting on various historical events, beginning with the Thirty Years war (1618-48) and ending with a discussion of the king of Prussia. Other subjects include the Teutonic Knights of Livonia, the war of the Romans and the 17th century civil war.
Wilmott, Robert Eldrdge Aris.“Arnold and Smyth on Modern History.” Fraser’s Magazine, 26, no. 156: (December 1842): [632]-646.
        Reviews volumes of lectures by Thomas Arnold at Oxford and William Smyth at Cambridge. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“The History of Poland and Russia.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 9, no. 98: (December 1842): 134.
        States that this work is more descriptive than historical, which is an advantage, and that it is instructive and entertaining. Reviewed: Corner, Julia. The History of Poland and Russia from the Earliest Periods to the Present Time, adapted to Youth, Schools, and Families. Dean and Munday.
“Von Rolleck’s General History of the World.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 9, no. 108: (December 1842): 816–17.
        This comprehensive work benefits from the author’s liberal views and philosophical spirit and is regarded as an invaluable book for students of general and elementary history; it can take the place of many other works on various historical topics. Reviewed: Von Rollack, Charles. General History of the World; from the earliest Times to 1831. Longman & co.
Kelly, Matthew.“A Compendious Ecclesiastical History, from the Earliest Period to the Present Time.” Dublin Review, 14, no. 27: (February 1843): 178–223.
        Examines the theories and content of this book by the Rev. William Palmer; states that the author is not the best authority on Irish ecclesiastical affairs and can often be biased and lack impartiality. Book published 1840. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“A Popular History of British India, Commercial Intercourse with China, and the Insular Possessions of England in the Eastern Seas.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 10, no. 110: (February 1843): 130–33.
        States that this simple narrative of facts about the empire in India offers none of the author’s own opinions or thoughts but is useful in answering general questions; the work is also beneficial in offering one of the first authentic accounts of the beginning of trade with the China. Reviewed: Taylor, W. Cooke. A Popular History of British India, Commercial Intercourse with China, and the Insular Possessions of England in the Eastern Seas. Madden & co.
“Elements of Universal History.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 10, no. 111: (March 1843): 201.
        The most comprehensive and valuable compendium of general history, which is useful both as a reading book and as a reference work. Reviewed: White, H. Elements of Universal History. Oliver & Boyd.
Johnstone, Christian Isobel.“The History of Woman in England.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 10, no. 111: (March 1843): 193–96.
        States that this book must have been quite a labour to research, as it examines the common women of the past. Review notes that most previous works have focused on the history of Royal women, and approves the attention to women of the workshop and the farm house. Offers many excerpts with little critique. Reviewed: Lawrance, Hannah. The History of Woman in England. vol I.
Jeffrey, Francis.“The Ecclesiastical and Political History of the Popes of Rome, during the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries.” Dublin Review, 14, no. 28: (May 1843): 321–79.
        Examines the theories and content of Leopold Ranke’s book, questions the author’s validity as a historian; states that many irrelevant topics are overreached. Translator is Sarah Austin. Book published 1841. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“History of Our Own Times.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 10, no. 114: (June 1843): 406.
        This first volume is all about the French Revolution but the work as a whole promises to be voluminous. Reviewed: History of our own Times. vol. I. Henry Colburn.
“History of the Life of Coeur-de-Lion.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 10, no. 115: (July 1843): 475.
        Full of interesting matter and well-researched. Reviewed: James, G.P.R. History of the Life of Coeur-de-Lion. Saunders & Otley.
“History of the Sandwich Islands.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 10, no. 116: (August 1843): 537–40.
        This work is full of useful facts and comes at a opportune time, as these Islands’ interaction with the Britain is increasing. Mainly discusses the content of the work. Reviewed: Jackson, James. History of the Sandwich Islands. London: Moxon.
“The Original History of Ancient America.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 10, no. 117: (September 1843): 611.
        The work is somewhat racy and many readers will be sceptical of the thesis and theories contained in its pages. Reviewed: Jones, George. The Original History of Ancient America, founded upon the Ruins of Antiquity: The identity of the Aborigines with the People of Tyrus and Israel, and the introduction of Christianity by the Apostle Thomas. Longman & co.
“Mesmerism; Its History, Phenomena, and Practice.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 10, no. 118: (October 1843): 679.
        States that the author is neither a supporter or believer of mesmerism but merely wants to add to the facts known on the subject. Reviewed: Mesmerism; its History, Phenomena, and Practice, with Reports of Cases Developed in Scotland. Edinburgh: Fraser & co. London: W.S. Orr.
John Hill Burton.“History of St. Andrews.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 10, no. 120: (December 1843): 797–802.
        The book is judged to be very biased, and compiled with questionable methods. Reviewed: Lyon, C.J. Episcopal, Monastic, Academics, and Civil; comprising the principal part of the Ecclesiastical History of Scotland, from the earliest age till the present time. Edinburgh: William Tait. (Attribution: Wellesley Index).
Turnbull, William Barclay David Donald.“History of St. Andrews, Episcopal, Monastic, Academic, and Civil; Comprising the Principal Part of the Ecclesiastical History of Scotland from the Earliest Age to the Present Time.” Dublin Review, 15, no. 30: (December 1843): 454–69.
        States that although this book by C. J. Lyons is commendable for its attempt at presenting a history of the author’s native country , it was poorly planned and awkwardly translated; moreover it contains ‘monstrosities on every page.’ {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Milman, H. H.“History of the Conquest of Mexico, with a Preliminary View of the Ancient Mexican Civilization, and the Life of the Conqueror, Hernando Cortes.” Quarterly, 73, no. 145: (December 1843): 187–235.
        Praise for the author’s skills as a historian and archival researcher (noting that Prescott’s style has fewer jarring Americanisms than formerly). Reviewed: Prescott, William H. History of the Conquest of Mexico, with a Preliminary View of the Ancient Mexican Civilization, and the Life of the Conqueror, Hernando Cortes. 1843. attribution Wellesley Index}.
“Justorum Semita; or the Path of the Just. A History of the Saints and Holidays of the Present English Kalendar.” Dublin Review, 15, no. 30: (December 1843): 558.
        States that this work is truly Catholic and delightful and that it is written with elegance and spirit.
Burton, John Hill.“Tytler’s History of Scotland.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 11, no. 122: (February 1844): 85–94.
        States this work provides a closer appeal to fact than many others, and that Tytler is more inclined to offer the naked truth of character and circumstance, leaving the reader with a very true picture of the historical period they are reading about. Reviewed: Tytler. History of Scotland. vol. IX. Edinburgh: Tait. (Attribution: Wellesley Index).
Wiseman, Nicholas (Cardinal).“Abbe M’Geoghegan’s History of Ireland (New Edition).” Dublin Review, 16, no. 31: (March 1844): 277.
        States that this work contains useful historical knowledge, has beautiful physical characteristics, and is the most valuable book about Irish history to date. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“Bancroft’s History of the United States of America.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 11, no. 123: (March 1844): 202.
        States that although this work may be criticized by some as not being history (due to the methods employed and its structure) it is put together with vitality, comprehensiveness, and breadth of view. Reviewed: Bancroft. History of the United States of America; from the Discovery of the American Continent to the War of Independence. Edinburgh, London, and Glasgow: Fullarton.
Sullivan, Maurice John.“History of the Conquest of Mexico.” Dublin Review, 16, no. 31: (March 1844): 45–65.
        Offers content of W. H. Prescott’s book, as well as excerpt; states that it is eloquent, utilizes excellent primary sources, and has much literary and moral value. Book published 1843. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Burton, John Hill.“Tytlers’s History of Scotland.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 11, no. 123: (March 1844): 156–63.
        States that this ninth volume has an overall gentlemanly tone; that Tytler’s opinions are clear and decided and the work demonstrates the candour of his remarks and judgement. (Attribution: Wellesley Index).
“Backgammon, Its History and Practice.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 11, no. 124: (April 1844): 271.
        Notes that it is surprising that a whole work can be dedicated to this topic, but the work was cleverly written and well illustrated. Reviewed: Backgammon, its History and Practice, by the Author of Whist; with illustrations by Kenny Meadows.
“The Treasury of History.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 11, no. 124: (April 1844): 271.
        Reviewer judges that the history of Great Britain is given properly, with detail and not in the usually dry and formal style. Reviewed: Maunder, Samuel. The Treasury of History; comprising a General Introductory Outline of Universal History, Ancient and Modern, and a Series of Separate Histories of every principal Nation that exists: their Rise, Progress, Present condition. Longman & co.
“The United States of America; Their History.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 11, no. 123: (April 1844): 202.
        States this work displays great mastery on the subject; presents facts in detail in a comprehensive manner. Reviewed: Murray, Henry. The United States of America; their History from the earliest period, their Industry, Commerce, Banking Transactions, and National Works; their Institutions and Character, Political, Social, and Literary, with a Survey of their Territory, and Remarks on the prospects and plans of Emigrants. Vol. I. Oliver & Boyd.
“The United States of America: Their History.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 11, no. 124: (April 1844): 271.
        Discusses the content of this second volume and states that the critique will come when the third volume is reviewed. Reviewed: Murray, Hugh. The United States of America: their History from the Earliest Period; their Industry, Commerce, Banking Transactions, and National Works; their Institutions and Character, Political, Social, and Literary. Vol. II. Oliver & Boyd.
“Outlines of History of Ireland, for Schools and Families.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 11, no. 125: (May 1844): 336.
        Entertaining, useful, creditable, and impartial. Reviewed: Publisher, in Dublin, is Curry.
“History of Ireland and the Irish People, under the Government of England.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 11, no. 126: (June 1844): 401–2.
        Judges that this work is impartial and useful to general readers in offering a continuous view of leading events in Irish history. Reviewed: Smiles, Samuel. History of Ireland and the Irish People, under the Government of England. London: Strange.
“History of England, from the Peace of Utrecht.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 11, no. 127: (July 1844): 462–64.
        Summarizes the content and offers excerpts. Reviewed: Lord Mahon. History of England, from the Peace of Utrecht. Vol. IV. London: John Murray.
“The History of Cleveland.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 11, no. 127: (July 1844): 471–72.
        States this work is useful, well printed and contains good engravings. Reviewed: Ord, J. Walker. The History of Cleveland. Part I, II, III. London: Simpkin, Marshall & co., Edinburgh: Tait.
“Maxwell’s History of the Rebellion in Ireland in 1798.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 11, no. 128: (August 1844): 540.
        Not actually reviewed, just listed. Part VII. London: A.H. Baily & co.
“A History of China, from the Earliest Records to the Treaty with Great Britain in 1842.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 11, no. 129: (September 1844): 603–4.
        Claims that although Thornton has produced an interesting volume, this topic may be too broad in scale to be complete satisfactorily in the 2 volumes he proposes. Reviewed: Thornton, Thomas. A History of China, from the Earliest Records to the Treaty with Great Britain in 1842. London: Wm. II Allen & co.
“History of the Oregon Territory and British North American Fur Trade.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 11, no. 129: (September 1844): 601–3.
        States that the author makes a better narrator than a politician; he describes events well and produces an entertaining work. A lengthy excerpt is included. Reviewed: Dunn, John. History of the Oregon Territory and British North American Fur Trade; with an account of the Habits and Customs of the principle North American Tribes on the Northern Continent. London: Edward & Hughes.
“The History of the English Revolution.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 11, no. 129: (September 1844): 598–601.
        Work is well received, well-written and beneficial to foreigners seeking information of the subject. Reviewed: Dahlmann, F.E. The History of the English Revolution. trans. H Evans Lloyd. London: Longman & co.
Cunningham, William.“The United States of North America; Their History from the Earliest Period; Their Industry, Commerce, Banking Transactions, and National Works; Their Institutions and Character, Political, Social, and Literary; with a Survey of the Territory, and Remarks upon the Prospects and Plans of Emigrants.” North British, 2, no. 3: (November 1844): 136–74.
        Review notes that Hugh Murray’s book offers a detailed discussion of the subject and recommends it as offering a great amount of important and useful information, written in a judicious and conciliatory spirit. (Attribution: Wellesley Index).
“Ballads and Lays from Scottish History.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 11, no. 132: (December 1844): 795.
        States that these national poems are animated, correct, instructive and impressive. Reviewed: Clyne, Norval. Ballads and Lays from Scottish History. Edinburgh: Shand.
“Maxwell’s History of the Irish Rebellion 1798.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 11, no. 122: (December 1844): 136.
        Reviewer expresses hope that Maxwell will be less one-sided than scholars of the past. Reviewed: Maxwell. History of the Irish Rebellion 1798.
“BOYD’S HISTORY OF LITERATURE -- ORIGIN OF TIME RECKONINGS.” Chambers’s, 0, no. 53: (4 January 1845): 12–14.
        This review (with extensive excerpts) of Sir William Boyd’s multi-volume work examines the history of the recognition of time; discusses the concept of time throughout history and within various cultures (Roman, Egyptian, Jewish). Specifically, looks at the effect of the solar system on time recognition, changing calendars, and the evolution of the concept of time.
“The History of British India from 1805 to 1835.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 12, no. 134: (February 1845): 130–31.
        States that the author is a fair and candid writer and that he presents facts with honesty and impartiality. Also states that the author is well suited to write about the subject. Reviewed: Wilson, Horace Hayman. The History of British India from 1805 to 1835. London: James Madden & co.
Robertson, Thomas Campbell.“The History of the British Empire in India.” North British, 2, no. 4: (February 1845): 324–59.
        Offers a lengthy discussion of the content of Edward Thornton’s 1843 book, and criticizes specific aspects including a biased attitude towards the government of Lord Cornwalis. Also points out that the work details some topics but brushes over others. The reviewer also seems displeased by Thornton’s military tone throughout the work. (Attribution: Wellesley Index).
Maitland, Edward Francis.“The Life and Correspondence of Thomas Arnold, D.D., Late Head Master of Rugby School, and Regius Professor of Modern History in the University of Oxford.” North British, 2, no. 4: (February 1845): 403–43.
        Maitland offers an in-depth discussion of A. P. Stanley’s biography, providing many excerpts and some criticisms. Unsatisfactory aspects are countered, however, by Stanley’s intimate acquaintance and sympathy with the subject. The reviewer also commends Stanley for his very impartial approach to the life of Arnold. (Attribution: Wellesley Index).
Flanagan, Thomas.“The History and Antiquities of the Anglo-Saxon Church.” Dublin Review, 18, no. 35: (March 1845): 128–74.
        Examines John Lingard’s book from the perspective of earlier works on the same subject; then offers a discussion in depth of the content, with numerous excerpts. Publisher is C. Dolman, 1844. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“Lays and Ballads, Chiefly from English History.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 12, no. 136: (April 1845): 266.
        States that this work for children flows easily, has useful notes to illustrate the lays and ballads, and should have a place in any juvenile library. Reviewed: Small, S.M. Lays and Ballads, chiefly from English History. London: James Burns.
“On the History and Art of Warming and Ventilatio Rooms and Buildings, &c. &c.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 12, no. 136: (April 1845): 266–67.
        Judges that this work is too much history and not enough instruction on how to construct these spaces, but that it is well-researched and would be beneficial to physicians who need to direct temperature during cold season. Reviewed: Bernan, Walter. On the History and Art of Warming and Ventilatio Rooms and Buildings. London: George Bell.
“WRITING HISTORY FOR THE PEOPLE.” Chambers’s, 0, no. 68: (19 April 1845): 255–56.
        Using comments reproduced from the Athenaeum and excerpts from Alphonse de Lamartine’s book, this article focuses on the many problems with the writing of history and how it may be re-evaluated and rewritten to become useful and interesting to the general reader and not only for scholars.
Fraser, Patrick.“History of St. Andrews, Episcopal, Monastic, Academic, and Civil, Comprising the Principal Part of the Ecclesiastical History of Scotland, from the Earliest Age till the Present Time.” North British, 3, no. 5: (May 1845): 196–211.
        Fraser begins by stating that the Rev. C. J. Lyon’s 1843 book is more of commentary on the ecclesiastical history of Scotland than a history of St. Andrews. Further states that the documentation is weak and the author is heavily biased. Stating that the sources are ‘garbage of Episcopalian writers’ and that the observations of Presbyterians and their faith made by Lyon are abusive and intolerant. (Attribution: Wellesley Index).
“Maxwell’s History of the Irish Rebellion.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 12, no. 137: (May 1845): 336.
        Notes the number of useful illustrative plates in parts 14 and 15 of this work, including a full length portrait of Robert Emmett.
“Thiers’ History of France Under Napoleon.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 12, no. 137: (May 1845): 310–23.
        Claims that this work is a clear and eloquent narrative, and that the author shows appreciation of personal character with respect to the leading actors in his history. Reviewed: Thiers, M.A. History of France Under Napoleon. vol. I & II. trans. D. Forbes Campbell. London: Colburn.
“HISTORY OF THE FIREPLACE.” Chambers’s, 0, no. 70: (3 May 1845): 274–77.
        Spans from the middle ages until the time of Queen Mary; includes information on humankind’s initial interaction with fire and proceeds to means of containing fire and using it for various purposes, and thus to the development of the hearth/fireplace over time. Examines the evolution and use of the fireplace among Romans, English, Egyptians and Jews.
Russell, Charles William.“The History of the Church of England in the Colonies and Foreign Dependencies of the British Empire.” Dublin Review, 18, no. 36: (June 1845): 583–84.
        States that although this book by the Rev. J. S. M. Anderson focuses more on the colonization aspect than the religious, it is diligently researched and its tone is fair and conciliatory. Publisher is Rivingtons. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Cunningham, William.“Elements of Church History.” North British, 3, no. 6: (August 1845): 444–53.
        States that this work could not have a better suited author than David Welsh and his 1844 first volume (from the birth of Christ to 300) is valuable, written with a philosophical and judicious spirit, extensively researched, and overall illustrates the advantages of studying church history. (Attribution: Wellesley Index).
Fraser, Patrick.“History of Scotland, 1829-1843.” North British, 3, no. 6: (August 1845): 345–86.
        While insisting that a work of such prominence and great success is above reviewing, the reviewer nevertheless finds some faults. States that Patrick Fraser Tytler’s work is incomplete as it starts too late and also points out that he expresses some prejudices. The reviewer than goes on to earlier histories of Scotland upon which Tytler may have drawn; also notes that Tytler used ideas of other scholars without acknowledgement. On the other hand commends Tytler for his various and good use of sources. (Attribution: Wellesley Index).
“The History of Etruria.” North British, 3, no. 6: (August 1845): 454–69.
        Discusses the content of the 1843 work in detail and states that [Agnes M.] ('Mrs’) Hamilton Gray offers some ingenious theories and that her work is instructive, interesting and overall well done, while pointing out that she tends to rely too heavily on ‘philological psychosis’.
“The Punjaub.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 12, no. 140: (August 1845): 534.
        States that this account is plain and sensible but covers all the important topics. Reviewed: Steinbach, Lieutenant-Colonel. The Punjaub: being an Account of the Country of the Sikhs; its Extent, History, Commerce, Productions, Government, Manufactures, Laws, Religion. London: Smith, Elder, & co. See also May 1846.
“A Hand-Book of Spain; for Travellers in Spain, and Readers at Home: Describing the Country and Cities; the Natives and Their Manners; the Antiquities, Religion, Legends, Literature, Pine Arts, Sports, and Gastronomy; with Notices on Spanish History.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 12, no. 141: (September 1845): 610.
        Judges that this work is comprehensive and its systematic and lucid arrangement prevent repetition. Reviewed: A Hand-Book of Spain; for Travellers in Spain, and Readers at home: describing the Country and Cities; the Natives and their Manners; the Antiquities, Religion, Legends, Literature, Pine Arts, Sports, and Gastronomy; with Notices on Spanish History. Part I & II. London: John Murray.
“A History of Ireland; Adapted for Schools, Youths, and Families.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 12, no. 141: (September 1845): 611.
        Notes that this work is impartial and useful to those who have the time for voluminous histories. Reviewed: Miss Corner. A History of Ireland; adapted for Schools, Youths, and Families. London: Deans & co.
Gleig, G. R.“Military Miscellany; Comprehending a History of the Recruiting of the Army, Military Punishments, &c. &c.” Quarterly, 76, no. 152: (September 1845): 387–424.
        The Wellesley Index to Victorian Periodicals tells us that the reviewer is G. R. Glieg; author of one of the three works reviewed under this heading. He judges his own work to be ‘more successful than in several of [Gleig’s] preceding performances -- writing with a love and an intimate knowledge of his subject, he condenses clearly, and now and then expatiates with happy energy.’ Having dispatched all three works briefly, Glieg spends the remainder of his 38 pages on the subject of moral discipline of the British Army. Reviewed: Marshall, Henry. Military Miscellany; comprehending a History of the Recruiting of the Army, Military Punishments. 1845. With A Sketch of the Military History of Great Britain, by the Rev. G. R. Gleig, Principal Chaplain to the Forces. 1844. And A view of the Formation, Discipline, and Economy of Armies, by the late Robert Jackson. 1845. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Murphy, Dominick.“The History of Sweden, Translated from the Original of ANDERS FRYXELL.” Dublin Review, 19, no. 37: (September 1845): 229–65.
        States that this book by Anders Fryxell is interesting and well-written and offers content and excerpts. Book published 1844. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Russell, Charles William.“The Military History of the Irish Nation, Comprising a Memoir of the Irish, Brigade, in the Service of France.” Dublin Review, 19, no. 38: (September 1845): [281]-311.
        Examines the content of Matthew O’Connor’s interesting and well-written work. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“Thiers’ History of Napoleon.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 12, no. 141: (September 1845): 566–79.
        Notes that this narrative is lively and has literary merit although it could upset British readers. Reviewed: Thiers, A. (former PM of France). History of France Under Napoleon. vol. II& III. trans. D. Forbes Campbell. London: Colburn.
“THE HISTORY OF HOUSE LIGHTS.” Chambers’s, 0, no. 88: (6 September 1845): 153–56.
        Spans from prehistory to the invention of gas lighting; It includes an examination of the evolution from torches to lamps and candles and finally to gas lighting, identifying the advantages and disadvantages of each. Examines the evolution of lighting among the Romans, the Egyptians, the Jews and the English.
“England and Its People.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 12, no. 143: (November 1845): 744.
        Judges this work one of the best histories of England. Reviewed: Taylor, Emily. England and its People; a Familiar History, for Young Persons, of the Country, and the Social and Domestic Manners of its Inhabitants, with Portraits and Illustrations. 2nd ed. London: Houlston & Stoneman.
Fraser, Patrick.“Letters of Mary Queen of Scots, and Documents Connected with Her Personal History.” North British, 4, no. 7: (November 1845): [5]-58.
        Discusses the content of Agnes Strickland’s 1842 edition of the letters. (Attribution: Wellesley Index).
“Memoir of George Heriot; with the History of the Hospital Founded by Him in Edinburgh, and an Account of the Heriot Foundation Schools.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 12, no. 143: (November 1845): 734–35.
        States that this work is interesting and entertaining but Steven has neglected to discuss how Heriot’s institutions benefitted society. Reviewed: Steven, William. Memoir of George Heriot; with the History of the Hospital founded by him in Edinburgh, and an Account of the Heriot Foundation Schools. Edinburgh: Bell & Bradfute.
“The History of the British Empire in India.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 12, no. 143: (November 1845): 740.
        Notes that this work presents details with accuracy and amplitude, is well executed with good spirit and tone and is a fair and lucid narrative on a difficult subject. Reviewed: Thornton, Edward. The History of the British Empire in India. London: W.H. Allan & co.
Gladstone, W. E.“History of the Church in Scotland.” Quarterly, 77, no. 153: (December 1845): 220–52.
        The anonymous reviewer is Gladstone in his Peelite cabinet minister days. A witty and engaged discourse on the subject, with little attention to the works ostensibly under review. Reviewed: Russell, Rev M. History of the Church in Scotland and several other works. . {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Denman, Thomas.“History of the House of Commons from the Convention Parliament of 1688-9 to the Passing of the Reform Bill in 1832.” Quarterly, 77, no. 153: (December 1845): 192–215.
        The work is a collection of biographical notices of MPs. The author’s judgment is ‘candid and dispassionate’, though the reviewer regrets so much attention to lawyers and so little to recent history. Reviewed: Townsend, W. Charles. History of the House of Commons from the Convention Parliament of 1688-9 to the passing of the Reform Bill in 1832. 1843. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“The Scottish Church; A View of Its History, Constitution, Doctrines, and Ceremonies.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 13, no. 145: (January 1846): 56–57.
        States that this work is carefully and cautiously written, is unbiased, and is clear, calm, and level in presenting explanatory statements. Reviewed: The Scottish Church; A View of its History, Constitution, Doctrines, and Ceremonies. ed. Alexander Leighton. Edinburgh: Wm Tait.
“Tytler’s Elements of General History, Ancient and Modern.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 13, no. 146: (February 1846): 132.
        This enlarged and improved edition uses the valuable original text and allows the spirit of the original text to shine through. Reviewed: Elements of General History, Ancient and Modern. Ed. Rev. Brandon Turner. London: Adam Scott.
“History of the Reformation of the Sixteenth Century.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 13, no. 147: (March 1846): 198–99.
        Review initially discusses the quarrel between publishers about who had the rights to publish this work in English, and then goes on to state that the new edition is better printed and is thus more expensive; judges the work to be interesting. Reviewed: D’Aubigne, J.H. Merle. History of the Reformation of the Sixteenth Century. 4th ed. Edinburgh: Oliver & Boyd. See also May and August 1846, and June 1853..
“Knight’s History of England during the Thirty Years’ Peace.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 13, no. 147: (March 1846): 201.
        Judges this work to be written in a liberal and enlightened spirit. Reviewed: Knight. History of England during the Thirty Years’ Peace. part I..
Jeffrey, Francis.“The History of the Great Reformation of the Sixteenth Century, in Germany, Switzerland, &c.” Dublin Review, 20, no. 39: (March 1846): 31–83.
        Discusses the history behind the construction of book by J. H. Merle d’Aubigne as well as summarizing the content. Book published 1841. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Russell, Charles William.“Water-Wheels, Especially Turbines or Whirl-Wheels; Their History, Construction, and Theory, Illustrated for the Use of Mechanics.” Dublin Review, 20, no. 39: (March 1846): 268.
        States that Sir Robert Kane’s edition, which is a component of a larger work by Moritz Ruhlmann, is interesting and useful. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“Essays on Subjects Connected with the Literature, Popular Superstitions, and History of England in the Middle Ages.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 13, no. 148: (April 1846): 267.
        States that this work will be admired, especially by those who study early literature or legend and lore of antiquity. Reviewed: Wright, Thomas. Essays on Subjects connected with the Literature, Popular Superstitions, and History of England in the Middle Ages. London: John Russell Smith.
“Sketches from Scripture History.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 13, no. 148: (April 1846): 263–64.
        Reviewer discusses the character of the author and how this work came to be published, offers an overview of the content, and gives a few excerpts. Reviewed: Scott, William. Sketches from Scripture History. Blackwood & Sons.
“Arnold’s Lectures on Modern History (3rd Ed).” Fraser’s Magazine, 33, no. 197: (May 1846): 596–605.
        Reviews the 3rd edition of Thomas Arnold’s lectures (published 1845 London: B. Fellowes; first edition 1842).
“Oliver & Boyd’s Standard Edition of D’Aubigne’s History of the Reformation.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 13, no. 149: (May 1846): 333.
        Reviewer discusses only the issues associated with the rights to translate and publish this work. Reviewed: Oliver & Boyd’s Standard Edition of D’Aubigne’s History of the Reformation. Edinburgh: Oliver & Boyd. See also March and August 1846 and June 1853.
“Outlines of the History of France, for Families and Schools.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 13, no. 151: (May 1846): 473.
        ‘This seems a well-digested, small compendium’ (the whole review). Reviewed: Cockayne, Rev. O. Outlines of the History of France, for Families and Schools. London: Parker.
“The Modern British Plutarch; or, Liver of Men Distinguished in the Recent History of Our Country for Their Talents, Virtues, or Achievements.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 13, no. 149: (May 1846): 332.
        Review observes that many lives are discussed, but not in minute or elaborate style; however this is acceptable since the book is intended for young readers. Reviewed: Taylor, W.C. The Modern British Plutarch; or, Lives of Men Distinguished in the Recent History of our Country for their Talents, Virtues, or Achievements. London: Grant & Griffith.
“The Punjaub; Being a Brief Account of the Country of the Sikhs, Its History, Extent, Commerce, Productions, &c.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 13, no. 149: (May 1846): 333.
        Reviews states that they reviewed this work last year (see August 1846) when the first edition came out and the review stands. Reviewed: Steinbach, Lieutenant Colonel. The Punjaub; being a Brief Account of the Country of the Sikhs, its History, Extent, Commerce, Productions. 2nd ed. London: Smith, Elder, & co.
Milman, H. H.“A History of Greece: 1. Legendary Greece; 2. Grecian History to the Reign of Peisistratus at Athens.” Quarterly, 78, no. 155: (June 1846): 113–44.
        The anonymous reviewer is the historian H. H. Milman. He compares British scholarship on Greece favourably with that of Germany. Admires Grote’s scholarship, especially his clarification of the differences between myth and history. Extensive excerpts. Reviewed: Grote, George. A History of Greece: 1. Legendary Greece; 2. Grecian History to the Reign of Peisistratus at Athens. 1846.{attribution Wellesley Index}.
Donaldson, John William.“AEgyptens Stelle in Der Weltgeschichte, &c.-Egypt’s Place in the History of the World: An Historical Treatise, in Five Books.” Quarterly, 78, no. 155: (June 1846): 145–74.
        Praise for the scholarship of the Prussian ambassador. Reviewed: Bunsen, Christian Charles Josias. AEgyptens Stelle in der Weltgeschichte, &c.-Egypt’s Place in the History of the World: an Historical Treatise, in five books. vol. i-iii. Hamburg, 1845. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Russell, Charles William.“An Outline of Ecclesiastical and Civil History, Exhibiting in Opposite Pages and under Corresponding Dates, the Principal Events Which Have Occurred since the Death of Christ.” Dublin Review, 20, no. 40: (June 1846): 532.
        Brief review states that this book by the Rev. Edmund Winstanley is accurate and will prove useful in Catholic Colleges. Publisher is T. Jones. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“Grote’s History of Greece.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 13, no. 150: (June 1846): 375–80.
        Judges Grote excellent at selecting important historical information and discerning the cause of progress in the people. Also states that this work deals well with the mythical history of the Greek culture and overall shapes up to be one of the great philosophical histories. Reviewed: Grote, George. History of Greece. Part I Legendary Greece, Part II Grecian History in the reign of Peisistratus of Athens. London: Murray.
“History of the Panjab; and of the Rise, Progress, and Present Condition of the S Ct and Nation of the Sik.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 13, no. 151: (July 1846): 468–71.
        The review mainly focuses on the content of the work and offers excerpts. Does state that the work makes use of original and valuable sources. Reviewed: (Anon.). History of the Panjab; and of the Rise, Progress, and present condition of the [S ct] and Nation of the Sik. London: Allen & co.
“D’Aubigne’s History of the Reformation.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 13, no. 152: (August 1846): 538.
        Discusses copyright of the work and publication costs. (no review of the actual text itself). Reviewed: D’Aubigne. History of the Reformation. Oliver & Boyd. For reviews see March and May 1846. For a later volume see June 1853.
Wiseman, Nicholas (Cardinal).“D’Aubigne’s History of the Great Reformation in Germany and Switzerland, Reviewed and Refuted; or the Reformation in Germany Examined in Its Instruments, Causes, Manner, and Its Influences on Religion, Government, Literature, and General Civilization.” Dublin Review, 21, no. 41: (September 1846): 266.
        States that this new edtion by the Rev. M. J. Spaldins , much like its predecessors, is recommended especially for the second part of the book. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“The History of Egypt, from the Earliest Times till the Conquest of the Arabs, A. D. 640.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 13, no. 153: (September 1846): 608.
        States this work is full of useful facts and is an important contribution to the history of progress of society. Reviewed: Sharpe, Samuel. The History of Egypt, from the Earliest Times till the Conquest of the Arabs, A. D. 640. London: Moxon.
“HISTORY OF A NATIONAL MISTAKE.” Chambers’s, 0, no. 140: (5 September 1846): [145]-148.
        An examination of the union between Scotland and England with the treaty of 1707 and the effects the union had on both countries; Includes a discussion of the resistance of the Scottish people, the English reaction, and the benefits the union brought to the Scots.
Burton, John Hill.“M’cullagh’s Industrial History of Free Nations.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 13, no. 154: (October 1846): 661–68.
        Notes that this work is full of instruction and excellent examples and is written with aptitude, ability, and clear and temperate judgement. Reviewed: McCullagh, W. Industrial History of Free Nations. Considered in Relation to their Domestic Institutions and External Policy. London: Chapman & Hall. (Attribution: Wellesley Index).
Lewes, George Henry.“Morell’s History of Modern Philosophy.” Fraser’s Magazine, 34, no. 202: (October 1846): 407–15.
        Brief comment on J. D. Morell’s Historical and Critical View of the Speculative Philosophy of Europe in the Nineteenth Century. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Godkin, James.“The History and Antiquities of the Anglo-Saxon Church.” North British, 6, no. 11: (November 1846): [3]-27.
        Reviewer discusses the topic briefly and then goes on to offer a detailed account of John Lingard’s 1845 work with many excerpts. (Attribution: Wellesley Index).
“THE HISTORY OF ETRURIA.” Fraser’s Magazine, 34, no. 204: (November 1846): 676–85.
        This article reviews the work of Mrs. (Elizabeth Caroline) Hamilton Gray (published Hatchard & Son, 1843-4). She identifies Resen with the ancestors of the Italian Etruscans (Rasenes). Her hypothesis looks at the origins of Etruria and considers questions such as who were their leaders, what inhabitants they found in Italy when they arrived and what did their culture consist of? The author of this article intends to argue against Gray’s hypothesis. To prove this, the author discusses Resen and its connection to the Etruscans, or lack thereof. The article is continued in the December 1846 issue.
“A Catholic History of England.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 14, no. 157: (January 1847): 62.
        Observes that although this is not a History of England in the traditional sense, it is an entertaining compilation of Monkish Chronicles that will be enjoyed by Catholic readers. Reviewed: MacCabe, William Bernard. A Catholic History of England. Part I: England as described by the Monkish Historians. London: Newby..
Wiseman, Nicholas (Cardinal).“Tales of the Century, or Sketches of the Romance of History, between the Years 1746 and 1846.” Dublin Review, 21, no. 42: (January 1847): 509–14.
        Authors are given as John Sobieski and Charles Edward Stuart. Summarizes content and provides excerpts. Publisher is Marshall, of Edinburgh. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Johnston, Christian Isobel.“Florentine History, from the Earliest Authentic Records to the Accession of Ferdinand the Third, Grand Duke of Tuscany.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 14, no. 158: (February 1847): 135–36.
        States that this work is instructive and entertaining and full of information (not all of which is relevant). Reviewed: Napier, Henry Edward. Florentine History, from the Earliest Authentic Records to the Accession of Ferdinand the Third, Grand Duke of Tuscany. London: Moxon.
“HISTORY OF PANTALOONS.” Chambers’s, 0, no. 165: (27 February 1847): 144.
        A very brief history of the garment with reference to the Romans, the Venetians, and St Pantaleon and how the garment came to be worn in English culture. Attributed to a posthumous volume of Southey’s Doctor.
Crolly, George.“A Catholic History of England.” Dublin Review, 22, no. 43: (March 1847): 92–124.
        States that this book by William Bernard McCabe simply utilizes the content of other works and does not bring anything new to the study of this topic. Publisher is Newby. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Eastlake, Elizabeth.“British Costume. A Complete History of the Dress of the Inhabitants of the British Islands.” Quarterly, 79, no. 158: (March 1847): 372–99.
        The anonymous reviewer, frequent QR contributor Lady Eastlake, writes in a masculine voice to critique the vagaries of men’s clothing. Reviewed: Planche, J.R. British Costume. A complete History of the Dress of the Inhabitants of the British Islands. 1847. attribution Wellesley Index}.
Harris, Elizabeth Furlong Shipton.“History of the House of Austria (Vol 1).” Dublin Review, 22, no. 43: (March 1847): 269.
        States that William Coxe’s book, dedicated to Luther and the Reformation , is beyond review and need only be congratulated, as the author’s past work speaks for itself. Attribution Wellesley Index.
“The National Music of Ireland, Containing the History of the Irish Bards, the National Melodies, the Harp, and Other Musical Instruments of Erin.” Dublin Review, 22, no. 43: (March 1847): 266–67.
        States that this book by Michael Conran is interesting, complete, and well supported with evidence; it successfully connects Irish music with that of other countries. Publisher is Duffy, 1846.
Troup, George.“History of the Sikhs, Vols. 1 & 2.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 14, no. 161: (May 1847): 346–50.
        States that although this work is hastily written it does have considerable value as no other history on the subject exists. Reviewed: McGregor, W.J. History of the Sikhs, Vols. 1 & 2. London: James Madden.
Troup, George.“A History of Rome, from the Earliest Times to the Death of Commodus, A.D. 192.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 14, no. 162: (June 1847): 419–20.
        Scan is illegible. Reviewed: Schmitz, Leonard. A History of Rome, from the Earliest Times to the Death of Commodus, A.D. 192. London: Taylor & Harton..
“A Manual of British and Irish History.” Dublin Review, 22, no. 44: (June 1847): 522–23.
        Simply discusses the attributes of the book by the Rev. Thomas Flanagan, also remarking that the book is of good physical quality, with good wood engravings, and useful tables and maps. Publisher is Jones.
Wiseman, Nicholas (Cardinal).“Sketches of the History of Christian Art.” Dublin Review, 22, no. 44: (June 1847): 486–515.
        Discusses the previous works on the subject and the content of this book by Lord Lindsay; states that this is the most complete on the subject and will prove useful to those travelling to Italy to visit galleries, and will awaken thought in the reader. Publisher is John Murray. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“Doubleday’s Financial History of England.” North British, 7, no. 14: (August 1847): 337–54.
        Offers a detailed account of this work and criticizes Doubleday’s style and approach, stating that it is biased to the point of making outlandish assumptions. Can only loosely be titled a history.
Bridges, Matthew.“A Scholastical History of the Canon of Holy Scripture, or the Certain and Indubitate Books Thereof, as They Are Received in the Church of England.” Dublin Review, 23, no. 45: (September 1847): 104–23.
        Looks at the content of this book by John Cosin, offering lengthy excerpts. Publisher is Talboys, of Oxford, 1843-1845. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Milman, H. H.“History of the Conquest of Peru.” Quarterly, 81, no. 162: (September 1847): [316]-350.
        In Prescott’s works, ‘the most laborious and dispassionate inquiry, instead of chilling down the history into a cold and unstirring chronicle, actually kindles it into a strange romance; fiction is pale and spiritless before the marvellous truth’. The anonymous reviewer (Milman) discusses the effect of Prescott’s visual disability on his authorship, including his explanation in this book. Reviewed: Prescott, William H. History of the Conquest of Peru. 1847. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
O’Hagan, John.“The Constitutional History of the University of Dublin, with Some Account of Its Present Condition and Suggestions for Improvement.” Dublin Review, 23, no. 45: (September 1847): 228–51.
        Examines the content of this book, by Denis Cauldfield Heron, as well as earlier works dedicated to this subject. Publisher is McGlashan, of Dublin. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“The History of the Saracens; Comprising the Lives of Mohammed and His Successors, to the Death of Abdalmelik, the Eleventh Caliph, with an Account of Their Most Remarkable Battles, Sieges, Revolts, &c.; Collected from Authentic Sources, Especially Arabic MSS.” Dublin Review, 23, no. 45: (September 1847): 271.
        States that the excellence of Simon Ockley’s book is beyond recommendation and congratulates the work also on being cheap. Publisher is Henry G. Bohn.
“WALTER SCOTT -- HAS HISTORY GAINED BY HIS WRITINGS?” Fraser’s Magazine, 36, no. 213: (September 1847): 345–51.
        Article debates the relative merits of history and historical fiction, deciding that history has not gain by Scott’s writings. Although his characters are living and breathing people, their historical truth is not preserved. The author believes that it is impossible for characters of the past to come to the present day and nor can we ever return to the characters of the past.
Redding, Cyrus.“HINTS UPON HISTORY.” Fraser’s Magazine, 36, no. 215: (November 1847): 558–67.
        This article states that memoirs and letters are ‘the legs of history.’ The author goes on to ask whether historians have extracted the truth from sources such as memoirs. To prevent further lies occurring in the telling of history, the author provides helpful hints: writers must reflect upon the source in order to extract the truth from it. The memoirs of Nelson, Lady Hamilton, Sir William Hamilton are used to demonstrate the importance of this statement. As well, the author suggests that the scope of history should be enlarged {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Troup, George.“History of the Conquest of Peru.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 14, no. 167: (November 1847): 779–85.
        States that this work is interesting, contains valuable information, is skillfully written, and the data was collected and analyzed with great care. The reviewer discusses much of the content in great detail and offers many useful excerpts. Reviewed: Prescott, William. History of the Conquest of Peru. London: Richard Bentley.
“Sketches of the History of Christian Art.” North British, 8, no. 15: (November 1847): 1–20.
        States that the reputation of the author, Lord Lindsay, is upheld with this work that does not disappoint. Discusses the content with excerpts.
Russell, Charles William.“A Manual of British and Irish History; Illustrated with Maps, Engravings, and Statistical, Chronological, and Genealogical Tables.” Dublin Review, 23, no. 46: (December 1847): 364–73.
        Another review of Rev. Thomas Flanagan’s work states that this is the most difficult and valuable work on the subject, and that its style is clear, simple, natural, and energetic; the narrative is graceful and vigorous. Publisher is Jones. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Kenealy, Edward Vaughan Hyde.“History of the Conquest of Peru, with a Preliminary View of the Civilization of the Incas.” Dublin Review, 23, no. 46: (December 1847): 322–40.
        States that although William Prescott seems to be an author who is above review, the reviewer is nevertheless going to be hard on him. States that there is nothing new in this work and it has a questionable style (contains Americanism). Presents the material in the work with many excerpts. Publisher is Bentley. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
MacCabe, William Bernard.“The History of the Penal Laws Enacted against Roman Catholics.” Dublin Review, 23, no. 46: (December 1847): 522–24.
        This brief review states that R. R. Madden’s history is valuable, honest, and well-researched and it is hoped that this work can be further reviewed in more depth later. Publisher is Richardson & Son. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“SKETCHES OF THE HISTORY OF EDUCATION.” Chambers’s, 0, no. 206: (11 December 1847): 372–75.
        An examination of the evolution of the educational system from the theories of Erasmus to the system in place in the mid 19th century. Focuses on the educational systems based on the theories of Cicero, Erasmus, Luther, and Trotzendorf; including their principles, how they were interpreted. and how they were changed over time.
“Schomburck’s History of Barbadoes.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 15, no. 169: (January 1848): 43–49.
        States that this work will prove to be useful to natives, statesman, scientists, and politicians. However the reviewer notes aspects of repetition and overlapping coverage. Reviewed: Schomburck, Sir Robert H. The History of Barbadoes: comprising a Geographical and Statistical Description of the Island: a Sketch of the Historical Events since the Settlement and an Account of its Geology and Natural Productions. London: Longman, Brown, Green, and Longman. [1888?].
“HISTORY OF A DESERTED SAILOR.” Chambers’s, 0, no. 213: (29 January 1848): 73–76.
        An account of the trials of a sailor left on an island in the South Atlantic in the 18th century; he left a journal recounting the problems and hardships he encountered.
Troup, George.“A History of Servia and the Servian Revolution.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 15, no. 171: (March 1848): 198–200.
        Scan is illegible. A History of Servia and the Servian Revolution. trans. Leopold Ranke. London: John Murray.
McMahon, Patrick.“Byways of History, from the Twelfth to the Sixteenth Century.” Dublin Review, 24, no. 47: (March 1848): 109–14.
        Author is Mrs R. Sinnett; subject-matter is primarily Luther. Publisher is Longman, 1847. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Troup, George.“Edda, or the Tales of a Grandmother: History of Denmark.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 15, no. 171: (March 1848): 194–98.
        Scan is illegible.
Jeffrey, Francis.“A History of the Holy Eastern Church.-The Patriarchate of Alexandria.” Dublin Review, 24, no. 48: (June 1848): 487–517.
        States that this history, by the Rev John Mason Neale, is interesting, devoted, and impartial but the review brings Neale’s capacity as an historian into question, noting his lack of good sources and his having abandoned an initial plan to provide an introduction. Publisher is Masters, 1847. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Russell, Charles William.“History of the Bank of England; Its Times and Traditions (3rd Ed).” Dublin Review, 24, no. 48: (June 1848): 526–27.
        States that John Francis’s book, which focuses on how banking arose and how the national bank was created and developed, is valuable; the author is well equipped for the undertaking as he describes events clearly and portrays characters boldly and truly. Publisher is Willoughby and Co. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“HISTORY OF THE BANK OF ENGLAND.” Chambers’s, 0, no. 238: (22 July 1848): 52–55.
        This account spans from the 1620s to the contemporary era and discusses the origin of keeping money outside the home and the evolution of the banking house.
“WELD’S HISTORY OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY.” Fraser’s Magazine, 38, no. 224: (August 1848): [129]-137.
        The reviewer thinks that Charles Richard Weld’s book is much needed (published J. W. Parker 1848).
“HISTORY OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY.” Chambers’s, 0, no. 241: (12 August 1848): 105–8.
        Review of the book by C. R. Weld (published by Parker), stressing the 17th-century origin and initial members of the Royal Society and discusses some of the things the organization did in the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries.
“NOTES TOWARDS A HISTORY OF THE BANK OF SCOTLAND.” Chambers’s, 0, no. 242: (19 August 1848): 121–23.
        Foundation and evolution of banking in Scotland from the 18th century.
Croker, J. W.“Outlines of the History of Ireland.” Quarterly, 83, no. 166: (September 1848): 584–614.
        The essay discusses the subject extensively, making no mention of the book ostensibly under review, which was probably an anonymous school history: Outlines of the History of Ireland for Schools and Families from the earliest period to the Union in 1800, with questions for examination, and Illustrations on wood. Published in Dublin by William Curry Jr. & Co. Reviewed: Outlines of the History of Ireland.. Dublin, 1847.{attribution Wellesley Index}.
Gladstone, W. E.“Presbytery Examined: An Essay, Critical and Historical, on the Ecclesiastical History of Scotland since the Reformation.” Quarterly, 84, no. 167: (December 1848): 78–105.
        ‘Every peer who employs the opportunities furnished by his high position, together with his natural gifts, in conscientious labour for the public good, is now more than ever an ornament and a bulwark to the State, and a blessing to the people.’ Reserves the right to criticize the Duke’s views, which are nevertheless far sounder than those of Dr Arnold. Reviewed: Duke of Argyll. Presbytery examined: an Essay, Critical and Historical, on the Ecclesiastical History of Scotland since the Reformation. 1848. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“MACAULAY’S HISTORY OF ENGLAND.” Chambers’s, 0, no. 261: (30 December 1848): 425–28.
        A glowing review of, with lengthy excerpts from, Thomas Babington Macaulay’s first two volumes.
Troup, George.“Woman’s History.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 16, no. 181: (January 1849): 67.
        States that this book will be useful and enjoyable for young women and women of the ‘high walks of life’, the class to which it is addressed. Reviewer does not discuss the content in much detail. Reviewed: ‘Gertrude,’ Women’s History. Glasgow: W.H. Ogilvie.
“SKETCHES OF THE HISTORY OF EDUCATION.” Chambers’s, 0, no. 263: (13 January 1849): 22–24.
        Discusses the evolution of education from memorization to a system involving more understanding and ability to apply learned material. Discusses the theories and methods of Montaigne (1533-1592) and Ratich (1571-1635) and how they affected educational systems.
“A SECOND GLANCE AT MR MACAULAY’S HISTORY.” Chambers’s, 0, no. 264: (20 January 1849): 34–38.
        A further discussion of Macaulay’s work, with comments on the style.
Troup, George.“Macaulay’s History of England.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 16, no. 182: (February 1849): 84–101.
        Judges the work to be well-written and manages very well the integration of integrating social and religious history with the usual political history. Reviewer states that the only real problem is that Macaulay tries so hard to be impartial and just that the work often comes off as cold and passionless. The work is cold but clear, unimpassioned but pleasing. Reviewed: Macaulay, Thomas Babington. History of England. London: Longman & co.
Cunningham, William.“‘Presbytery Examined:’ An Essay, Critical and Historical, on the Ecclesiastical History of Scotland since the Reformation.” North British, 10, no. 20: (February 1849): 424–58.
        Review of an essay by the Duke of Argyll, describing it as eloquent; the author clearly appreciates and understands religion. Nevertheless, most of the review focuses on pointing out various errors. (Attribution: Wellesley Index).
Brewster, David (Sir).“The History of England, from the Accession of James II.” North British, 10, no. 20: (February 1849): 367–424.
        States that T. B. Macaulay’s book is very interesting, will be read and valued, and brings to life the events and characters it addresses. However Brewster also states that the work has a tendency to be repetitive, dates are sometimes omitted, and often the narrative is interrupted with ancient historical information that distracted readers. (Attribution: Wellesley Index).
Scott, David Dundas.“The History of Rome from the First Punic War to the Death of Constantine.” North British, 10, no. 20: (February 1849): 329–49.
        This review of an edition of Niebuhr’s history by Leonhard Schmitz focuses mostly on the German historian’s life, qualifications and works, then moves on to discuss translations and studies based on his work. States that such works often lose Niebuhr’s style and ideas in translation as the translators and editors often fail to comprehend his complex ideas. (Attribution: Wellesley Index).
Croker, J. W.“The History of England from the Accession of James II.” Quarterly, 84, no. 168: (March 1849): 549–630.
        The Quarterly’s famous, scathing Croker review of Macaulay’s two volumes on the Glorious Revolution. ‘Mr Macaulay’s historical narrative is poisoned with a rancour more violent than even the passions of the time; and the literary qualities of the work, though in some respects very remarkable, are far from redeeming its substantial defects. There is hardly a page . . . that does not contain something objectionable . . . and the whole of the . . . narrative is . . . impregnated to a really marvellous degree with bad taste, bad feeling, and . . . bad faith.’ Reviewed: Macaulay, Thomas Babington. The History of England from the Accession of James II. 1849.{attribution Wellesley Index}.
“HISTORY OF THE HIGH SCHOOL OF EDINBURGH.” Chambers’s, 0, no. 271: (10 March 1849): 151–53.
        Review of William Steven’s book (published Maclachlen and Stewart), which covers the history of the High School of Edinburgh from the early 16th century until the late 18th century.
“The History of England during the Thirty Years’ Peace.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 17, no. 184: (April 1849): 265.
        States that this work is fairly written, contains good illustrations and is valuable as a record of dates and facts. Reviewed: The History of England during the Thirty Years’ Peace. ed. Charles Knight & Miss [Harriet] Martineau. London: Charles Knight.
“SKETCHES OF THE HISTORY OF EDUCATION.” Chambers’s, 0, no. 277: (21 April 1849): 249–52.
        A discussion of the theories, works, and contributions to the educational system of John Amos Comenius (1592- 1671).
“Epitome of Alison’s History of Europe, from the French Revolution to the Restoration of the Bourbons.” Dublin Review, 26, no. 52: (June 1849): 530–31.
        States that this useful and valuable work contains good indexes, chronological tables, and summaries of events; Archibald Alison’s is not only a good history but also a convenient reference work. Publisher is Blackwood .
Russell, Charles William.“The History of England, from the Accession of James II (Vols 1 & 2).” Dublin Review, 26, no. 52: (June 1849): 390–441.
        In an article that discusses the author as well as the subject-matter of the book, the reviewer observes that although Macaulay’s book is frequently inaccurate and often offers too much detail, it is well-researched and offers clear accounts of the events. Publisher is Longman. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Hetherington, William Maxwell.“The Ten Years’ Conflict: Being the History of the Disruption of the Church of Scotland.” North British, 11.8, no. 22: (August 1849): 436–56.
        States that Robert Buchanan’s book is important and able, utilizes good supporting evidence, has an easy and dignified style which flows well, and is full of eloquence and energy. However, this work leaves out some important elements of the controversy it discusses, such as some of the religious movements behind it. (Attribution: Wellesley Index).
Russell, Charles William.“A Catholic History of England.” Dublin Review, 27, no. 53: (September 1849): 128–46.
        States that this book, by William Berhard MacCabe, is well-researched and impartial; examines the content of the work with excerpts. Publisher is Newby. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“Outlines of English History: Outlines of French History: Outlines of General Knowledge.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 16, no. 189: (September 1849): 601.
        Notes that these works contain a vast amount of valuable and interesting knowledge and will be useful to teachers and parents of children in school. Reviewed: Ince, Henry. Outlines of English History: Outlines of French History: Outlines of General Knowledge. London: James Gilbert.
“The History of England, for the Use of Schools and Young Persons (6th Ed).” Dublin Review, 27, no. 53: (September 1849): 258.
        This brief review states that book by W. F. Mylius is carefully compiled, utilizes excellent sources, and is just and solid in its views. Publisher is Richardson and Son.
“ART OF HISTORY.” Chambers’s, 0, no. 297: (8 September 1849): [145]-147.
        The history of the study of history and the evolution of the field from the time of the Hebrews (identified as the first historians) until the present. Signed L.R.
Troup, George.“Early Scottish History.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 16, no. 190: (October 1849): [615]-622.
        Reviewer discusses how the work came to be created and published, and then goes on to summarize the content and question the validity of some of its claims. Reviewed: Lord Lindsay. Early Scottish History: Lives of the Lindsays. London: John Murray.
Troup, George.“History of St. Andrews.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 16, no. 191: (November 1849): 750.
        States that this work contains varied and interesting content, has well done plates, and is well arranged. Also notes that it will prove useful as a guide book to visiting tourists as well as a useful history book for the general public. Reviewed: Roger, Rev. Charles. History of St. Andrews. Edinburgh: Adam and Charles Black.
MacCabe, William Bernard.“The History of St. Cuthbert; or, an Account of His Life, Decease, and Miracles; of the Wanderings with His Body at Intervals during 124 Years; of the State of His Body from His Decease until A. D. 1542; and of the Various Monuments Erected to His Memory.” Dublin Review, 27, no. 54: (December 1849): 512–28.
        Examines the content of this book by the Rev. C. Eyre; states that it is invaluable, thoroughly researched, and interesting. Publisher is James Burns. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Troup, George.“The History of the Puritans in England.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 17, no. 193: (January 1850): 57.
        States that this work is written in a ‘judicious and moderate spirit’ and that it will do well in making the origins of New England States better known. Reviewed: Prof. Stowell. The History of the Puritans in England. London and Edinburgh: Thomas Nelson.
Stanley, A. P.“History of Greece.” Quarterly, 86, no. 172: (March 1850): 384–415.
        Praise for Grote’s achievement; ‘a stately and heart-stirring narrative of the deeds of living men’. The reviewer (Stanley) expresses pride in recent English successes in history-writing. Reviewed: Grote, George. History of Greece. vol. III-VIII. 1847-1850. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Reeve, Henry.“Memoirs of the House of Brandenburg and History of Prussia during the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries.” Quarterly, 86, no. 172: (March 1850): 337–63.
        The anonymous reviewer (the politician and journalist Henry Reeve) admires Ranke’s archival method (‘the greatest conquest of modern literature over the jealousy of politics’). On the other hand, the method does not help the author’s fragmentary style. Translated by: Alexander and Lady Duff Gordon. Reviewed: Ranke, Leopold. Memoirs of the House of Brandenburg and History of Prussia during the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries. 1849. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Russell, Charles William.“The History of Peter the Cruel, King of Castile and Leon.” Dublin Review, 28, no. 55: (March 1850): 1–25.
        Offers an in-depth discussion of the content of the book by Prosper Merimee, with excerpts; claims that this work is extensively researched, utilizing original documents but is flimsy and arbitrary in places. Publisher is Bentley, 1849. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
MacCabe, William Bernard.“The History of the Papal States, from Their Origin to the Present Day.” Dublin Review, 28, no. 55: (March 1850): 123–41.
        Examines the Rev. John Miley’s book by discussing its arrangement and content, and offering excerpts; states that this work is valuable and original. Publisher is T.C. Newby. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Patmore, Coventry Kersey Dighton.“The Fourth Estate: Contributions towards a History of Newspapers, and of the Liberty of the Press.” North British, 13, no. 25: (May 1850): 159–88.
        States that the author, F. Knight Hunt, collects and presents interesting facts well and the work is full of useful information; however Patmore regrets that Hunt could not offer more information on such an interesting topic and perform more extensive research, commenting that his journalism keeps him too busy to continue his historical work. (Attribution: Wellesley Index).
Jeffrey, Francis.“History of the Inquisition, from Its Establishment to the Present Time, with an Account of Its Procedure and Narratives of Its Victims.” Dublin Review, 28, no. 56: (June 1850): 421–69.
        Discusses the Inquisition from ancient times until the present, making little attempt to review anything. Publisher is Ward & Co. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Gisborne, Thomas.“The History of Agriculture in Ancient, Medioeval, and Modern Times.” Quarterly, 87, no. 173: (June 1850): 141–89.
        An essay on the subject, with glancing references to Hoskyns’s book. Critique of ‘mild moralizing’ and ‘irrelevant’ passages; suggests the author borrowed without attribution from Dickson. Reviewed: Hoskyns, Chandos Wren. The History of Agriculture in Ancient, Medioeval, and Modern Times. 1849. Attribution Wellesley Index.
Kaye, John William (Sir).“The History of Christianity in India, from the Commencement of the Christian Era.” North British, 13, no. 26: (August 1850): 583–620.
        Review of several works, headed by that of Rev. James Hough, describes their content and discusses the major individuals covered. Attribution Wellesley Index.
“EARLY HISTORY OF THE USE OF COAL.” Chambers’s, 0, no. 345: (10 August 1850): 95–96.
        The history of coal; its uses from ancient times until the 15th century and the methods used to mine it.
Stanley, A. P.“History of Greece.” Quarterly, 88, no. 175: (December 1850): 41–69.
        Concentrates on Grote’s fine coverage of Socrates. Continues from comments in previous (March) number. Reviewed: Grote, George. History of Greece. vol. vii-viii. 1850. Attribution Wellesley Index.
Holland, Henry.“A History of the Romans under the Empire.” Quarterly, 88, no. 176: (March 1851): 385–416.
        Merivale’s book attempts to fill the void of Roman history before Gibbon’s coverage. These two volumes ‘a fair foundation for the whole work’, but ‘there is . . . a certain turgescence of phrase.’ Reviewed: Merivale, Charles. A History of the Romans under the Empire. 1850. Attribution Wellesley Index.
Kirwan, Andrew Valentine.“History of French Journals, and Biography of French Journalists.” Fraser’s Magazine, 43, no. 255: (March 1851): 350–66.
        Author is Edmond Texier; title is Histoire des Journeaux. Biographie des Journalists, contenant l’Histoire, politique, literaire, industrielle, pittoresque, et anecedotique, de chaque Journal publie a Paris, et la Biographie de ses Redacteurs. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Flanagan, Thomas.“A History of the Romans under the Empire (Vols 1 & 2).” Dublin Review, 30, no. 60: (June 1851): 436–53.
        Examines the content of Charles Merivale’s work, stating that the title is misleading as the book is more of a history of the life and times of Julius Caesar than a history of Rome from the first Triumvirate to the reign of Constantine as outlined by the author. Publisher is Longman, 1850. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Lushington, Franklin.“Personal History of Charles II.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 18, no. 210: (June 1851): 353–56.
        Notes that, while interesting, this work is biased, carelessly written, and disorganized to an extent that would distract readers. Reviewed: Lyons, Rev. C.J. Personal History of Charles II, from his Landing in Scotland, June 23, 1650, till his Escape out of England, Oct. 15, 1651. Edinburgh: Stevenson.
Innes, Cosmo.“The History of the Reformation in Scotland by John Knox.” Quarterly, 89, no. 177: (June 1851): 33–56.
        Praise for a much-needed new edition, whose margins are not ‘disfigured . . . with controversy.’ Reviewed: The History of the Reformation in Scotland by John Knox. ed. David Laing. 1848. Attribution Wellesley Index. (See earlier review of 1813 edition.).
“Palgrave’s History of Normandy and of England. Vol 1.” Fraser’s Magazine, 44, no. 259: (July 1851): 1–18.
        Laudatory review of Francis Palgrave’s first volume (published 1851, J. W. Parker).
Russell, Charles William.“A Short Catechism of English History, Ecclesiastical and Civil.” Dublin Review, 31, no. 61: (September 1851): 283.
        Very brief review states that this book by the Rev. T. A. Flanagan is clear, truthful, and presented with Catholic views. Publisher is Richardson and Son. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Cheney, Edward and R. H. Cheney.“History of the Church of Rome to the End of the Episcopale of Damasus, A.D. 384.” Quarterly, 89, no. 178: (September 1851): 451–91.
        Context is the ‘papal aggression’ and the article (none of the books ostensibly under review is mentioned) is sharply critical of the power of the papacy throughout Europe. Reviewed (among 8 works): Shepherd, E.J. History of the Church of Rome to the end of the Episcopale of Damasus, A.D. 384. 1851. Attribution Wellesley Index.
Bushby, Henry Jeffreys.“The History of British India, from 1805 to 1835.” Quarterly, 89, no. 178: (September 1851): 257–76.
        An essay on the practice of suttee, and Major Ludlow’s campaign to abolish it. No mention of the book by Wilson ostensibly under review. Reviewed: Wilson, Horace Hayman. The History of British India, from 1805 to 1835. vol.III. 1848. Attribution Wellesley Index.
Kirwan, Andrew Valentine.“History of the Restoration of Monarchy in France.” Fraser’s Magazine, 44, no. 262: (October 1851): [357]-370.
        Review of a two-volume work by Alphonse de Lamartine (translation published by Vizitelly, 1851) {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Mansfield, Horatio.“The History of Adult Education.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 18, no. 214: (October 1851): 646.
        Notes that this work is useful; ably and carefully compiled. Reviewed: Hudson, J.W. The History of Adult Education. London: Longman, Brown, Green, and Longmans.
Whately, Richard.“A History of the Hebrew Monarchy, from the Administration of Samuel to the Babylonish Captivity.” North British, 16, no. 31: (November 1851): 119–48.
        States that F. W. Newman’s work brings no new ideas forward; merely reiterates past ideas and theories, and ends too abruptly. Attribution Wellesley Index.
Wenckstern, Otto von.“History of the Hungarian War.” Fraser’s Magazine, 44, no. 264: (November 1851): 695–704.
        First of 8-part series of chapters comprising Wenckstern’s War in Hungary, which appear from November 1851 to June 1852 (later published in book form by J. W. Parker 1859). {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Bell, Robert.“History of the War in Afghanistan.” North British, 16, no. 31: (November 1851): 230–58.
        States that John William Kaye’s book is a comprehensive chronology and a valuable contribution to Indian history; it contains full, accurate, and impartial information, and is written with sound judgement. Attribution Wellesley Index.
Mansfield, Horatio.“History of British India.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 18, no. 216: (December 1851): 772.
        A credit to the author’s abilities and research skills, this work offers much valuable information in a small space and is spiritedly written. Reviewed: MacFarlane, Charles. History of British India. London: Routledge and Co. 1852.
Russell, Charles William.“The History of the Church of Rome, to the End of the Episcopate of Damascus, A.D. 384.” Dublin Review, 31, no. 62: (December 1851): 437–75.
        Examines and picks apart Edward John Shepherd’s ideas and content by offering many excerpts and examples. Claims that overall this work is anti-Roman, inaccurate, and skeptical. Publisher is Longman. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Mansfield, Horatio.“A History of the English Railway; Its Social Relations and Revelations.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 19, no. 217: (January 1852): 57–59.
        States that this work is well done like the previous works by Francis and is a testament to his abilities. Reviewed: Francis, John. A History of the English Railway; its Social Relations and Revelations. London: Longman and Co. 1851.
Froude, James Anthony.“King Alfred.” Fraser’s Magazine, VOLUME 45, JANUARY 1852: (January 1852): 74–87.
        Review of Reinhold Pauli’s 1851 book written in German. Apart from a number of quibbles about Pauli’s use of sources, Froude admires the book, but most of the essay is in praise of Alfred.  (Attribution: Wellesley Index).
Mansfield, Horatio.“History of the Consulate and the Empire of France under Napoleon.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 19, no. 218: (February 1852): 126.
        States that this translation of a highly valuable work is much appreciated. Reviewed: Thiers, A. History of the Consulate and the Empire of France under Napoleon. vol. X and XI. London: Colburn.
“MODERN HISTORY, AND OTHER MATTERS, AT CAMBRIDGE.” Fraser’s Magazine, 45, no. 266: (February 1852): 170–82.
        This article discusses lectures given by Sir James Stephen and other professors at Cambridge and how scientific methods, including moral science can be applied to history. J. S. Mill’s views on historical science are mentioned.
Russell, Charles William.“The History of Mary, Queen of Scots.” Dublin Review, 32, no. 63: (March 1852): 134–84.
        Examines past biographies on Mary and does much comparing this work of F. A. Mignet to those earlier works; the book does not add much to the topic and that Mignet can be unjust and lack impartiality. Publisher is Bentley, 1851. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“The History of the Whig Ministry of 1830 to the Passing of the Reform Bill.” Fraser’s Magazine, 45, no. 267: (March 1852): [247]-262.
        Reviewer comments on how unusual it is for John Arthur Roebuck to write a contemporary history (2 volume work published J. W. Parker 1852).
“The Half Century. Its History, Political and Social.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 19, no. 221: (May 1852): 312–13.
        Notes that this work is valuable, well-researched and presented with care but often has a florid and overbearing style. Reviewed: Wiles, Washington. The Half Century. its History, Political and Social. London: C. Gilpin. 1852.
Russell, Charles William.“A Manual of Ecclesiastical History from the First to the Twelfth Century Inclusive.” Dublin Review, 32, no. 64: (June 1852): 512–29.
        Reviewer compares the author of the work, the Rev. E. S. Foulkes, to others working on a similar subject (specifically Shepherd) and focuses more on testing the author’s principles than on the book under review. States that this work, which treats Church History like science, is partial and one sided. Publisher is Parker, 1851. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
O’Sullivan, Mortimer.“A Primer of the History of the Holy Catholic Church in Ireland, from the Introduction of Christianity to the Formation of the Modern Irish Branch of the Church of Rome.” Quarterly, 91, no. 181: (June 1852): 37–72.
        Context is the contemporary expectation of the decline of Catholicism in Ireland. Reviewed: King, Rev. R. A Primer of the History of the Holy Catholic Church in Ireland, from the Introduction of Christianity to the Formation of the Modern Irish Branch of the Church of Rome. 3rd ed. 1851. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Colton, D. T.“The History of England during the Thirty Years’ Peace, 1816-46.” Quarterly, 91, no. 181: (June 1852): 160–95.
        Two works of contemporary history are considered. Both are condemned for partisanship, errors and animosities. Reviewed: Martineau, Harriet. The History of England during the Thirty Years’ Peace, 1816-46. 1851. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“The Lost Steamer: A History of the Amazon.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 19, no. 222: (June 1852): 375–76.
        States that this work contains no valuable information on the Amazon in its many pages and goes on to point out several of the specific problems with content. Reviewed: Knox, R. The Lost Steamer: a History of the Amazon. London: John Von Voorst.
Kirwan, Andrew Valentine.“THIERS’ HISTORY OF THE CONSULATE AND EMPIRE, AND ITS APPLICABILITY TO COMING EVENTS.” Fraser’s Magazine, 45, no. 270: (June 1852): [605]-623.
        This article discusses the writings of Adolphe Thiers, including his representation of Napoleon, details of Bonaparte’s military tactics and his role as a dictator. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Mansfield, Horatio.“History of the Council of Trent.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 19, no. 223: (July 1852): 444.
        Notes that this translated work is comprehensive and complete; also a fine example of Edinburgh typography. Reviewed: Bungener, L.F. History of the Council of Trent. Edinburgh: Thomas Constable and Co., London: Hamilton, Adams, and Co. 1852.
Mansfield, Horatio.“Rhymes for Youthful Historians, on the History of England; Brought down to the Reign of Queen Victoria.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 19, no. 223: (July 1852): 440.
        States that this useful work arranges history into familiar couplets that will be easy for students to remember. Reviewed: Rhymes for Youthful Historians, on the History of England; brought down to the Reign of Queen Victoria. London: Wilson, Edinburgh: A. & C. Black, Dublin: J.M. Glashan.
“The Celt, the Roman, and the Saxon: A History of the Early Inhabitants of Britain, down to the Conversion of the Anglo-Saxons to Christianity.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 19, no. 223: (July 1852): 446–47.
        States that this work is valuable, contains a mass of information, has useful engravings, and will prove useful to young students. Reviewed: Wright, Thomas. The Celt, the Roman, and the Saxon: A History of the early Inhabitants of Britain, down to the Conversion of the Anglo-Saxons to Christianity. London: Arthur Hall. 1852.
Mansfield, Horatio.“Lives of the Sovereigns of Rassia, from Ru i to Nicholas; Including a History of That Empire, from Its Foundation to the Present Time.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 19, no. 224: (August 1852): 504–5.
        Notes that this work is entertaining and contains a mass of information. Reviewed: Fowler, George. Lives of the Sovereigns of Rassia, from Ru i to Nicholas; including a history of that Empire, from its foundation to the present time. vol. I. London: William Shubert.
Robertson, James Burton.“Der Cardinal Ximenes Und Die Kirchliche Zustande Spaniens Am Ende Des 15, Und Anfange Des 16 Jahrhunderts. Insbesondere Ein Beytrag Zur Geschichte Und Wurdigung Der Inquisition. [Cardinal Ximenes and the Ecclesiastical State of Spain at the Close of the Fifteenth and the Beginning of the Sixteenth Century; Containing Special Reference to the History of the Inquisition.].” Dublin Review, 33, no. 65: (September 1852): 140–83.
        Examines the content of this book by Dr Hefele, providing excerpts. States that it is more historical than biographical and is well-researched, clear, and utilizes an elegant style. Published in Tubingen, 1844. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Russell, Charles William.“History of the Council of Trent.” Dublin Review, 33, no. 65: (September 1852): 184–219.
        Examines various works that have been written on this topic and compares the works at hand (by Buckley, Rutjes, Brischar, Wessenberg, Mendham) to earlier books by Sarpi, Pallavinicini, and others. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“Our Iron Roads: Their History, Construction, and Social Influences.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 19, no. 225: (September 1852): 572.
        States this work is detailed, shows the labours that were taken in its creation; the engravings are really well done. Reviewed: Williams, Frederick S. Our Iron Roads: their History, Construction, and Social Influences. London: Ingram, Cooke & co.
“The History of the Painters of All Nations.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 19, no. 225: (September 1852): 568.
        Notes that this work has excellent engravings, is well-written and contains useful info. Reviewed: Blanc, M. Charles. The History of the Painters of All Nations. trans. Peter Berlyn. ed. M. Digby. London: John Cassell.
Mansfield, Horatio.“A Manual of Universal History: On the Basis of Ethnography.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 19, no. 226: (October 1852): 635.
        States this work is clear, polished, and valuable to both the learned and the learner. Reviewed: Wright, J.B. A Manual of Universal History: on the Basis of Ethnography. Bath: Binns and Goodman, London: Whittaker, Edinburgh: Oliver and Boyd. 1852.
Mansfield, Horatio.“History of the Jesuits: Their Origin, Progress, Doctrines and Designs.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 19, no. 226: (October 1852): 634–35.
        Announcement; no review as the editors are waiting until the concluding volume to make a critique but they expect it will be as well done as the author’s past works. Reviewed: Nicolini, G.B. History of the Jesuits: Their Origin, Progress, Doctrines and Designs. Edinburgh: J Nichol, London: J. Nisbet, 1852.
“Liturgy and Church History.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 19, no. 226: (October 1852): 638.
        States that this work will be useful to students and teachers and was created and put together with care. Reviewed: Bromby, Rev. C.H. Liturgy and Church History. London: Simpkin, Marshall, and co. 1852.
“Niebuhr’s Ancient History.” Fraser’s Magazine, 46, no. 276: (December 1852): 672–87.
        Author is Reinhold Niebuhr, Ancient History: Comprising Lectures on the History of the Asiatic Nations, the Egyptians, Greeks, Carthaginians, and Macedonians.; translator is L. Schmitz; publisher is Taylor, Walton & Maberley.
Maitland, S. R.“History of the Ancient Barony of Castle Combe in the County of Wilts, Chiefly Compiled from Original MSS.--with Memoirs of the Families of Dunstanville, Badlesmere, Tiptoft. Scorpe, Fastolf, &c.” Quarterly, 92, no. 184: (March 1853): 275–305.
        The heading of this review says the book is ‘not published’ , which apparently means that it was printed for private circulation. Neverthless the reviewer (the historian S. R. Maitland) treats it to a full public review. Reviewed: Scrope, George Poulett. History of the Ancient Barony of Castle Combe in the County of Wilts, chiefly compiled from original MSS.--with Memoirs of the Families of Dunstanville, Badlesmere, Tiptoft. Scorpe, Fastolf. 1852. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Mansfield, Horatio.“The History of Germany and the Austrian Empire; from the Earliest Period to the Present Time. Adapted for Youth, Schools, and Families.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 20, no. 233: (May 1853): 313.
        States that this work is compact yet comprehensive and contains all the necessary knowledge for a pupil learning dates and facts about German history. Reviewed: Miss [Julia] Corner. The History of Germany and the Austrian Empire; from the Earliest Period to the Present Time. Adapted for Youth, Schools, and Families. London: Thomas Dean and Son. 1853. (Book was first published 1841).
“Christ’s College, Brecon, Its Past History and Present Capabilities Considered, with Reference to a Bill Now before Parliament.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 20, no. 234: (June 1853): 382.
        States that this work is eloquent, well argued, and contains practical good sense. Reviewed: Christ’s College, Brecon, its Past History and Present Capabilities considered, with Reference to a Bill now before Parliament. London: Longman and co. 1853.
“History of the Reformation of the Sixteenth Century.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 20, no. 234: (June 1853): 378–80.
        States that this work is pleasant and readable; if the author stays true to himself this work will prove to be useful and well received. Reviewed: D’Aubigne, J.H. Merle. History of the Reformation of the Sixteenth Century. vol. V. trans. H. White. Edinburgh: Oliver and Boyd. Earlier volumes reviewed in 1846.
“History of the Romans Under the Empire.” Fraser’s Magazine, 47, no. 282: (June 1853): 657–69.
        The reviewer observes that Charles Merivale’s style is improving with the third volume, and in the second editions of the first two volumes.
Robertson James Craigie.“The History of the Church of Rome to the End of the Episcopate of Damasus, A.D. 384.” Quarterly, 93, no. 185: (June 1853): 83–116.
        Despite Shepherd’s ‘ability and learning,’ the results of his research are described as ‘rather startling’. Many documents trusted by other scholars are here called forgeries. Reviewed: Shephard, E.J. The History of the Church of Rome to the End of the Episcopate of Damasus, A.D. 384. 1851. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Agoult, Marie Catherine Sophie de Flavigny.“Gervinus, and His Introduction to the History of the Nineteenth Century.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 20, no. 235: (July 1853): [385]-390.
        Reviewer discusses the controversy over the creation and distribution of this work, offers a detailed account of its content. Also discusses unfortunate omissions, such as consideration of the economic and scientific state of European society. Reviewed: Gervinus, G.G. Introduction to the History of the Nineteenth Century. London: H.G. Bohn. 1853.
“History of Religious Intolerance in Spain, &c.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 20, no. 235: (July 1853): 442.
        States that although this work contains useful facts it suffers greatly from the compression of the material into a too-small space. Reviewed: de Castro, Don Alfonso. History of Religious Intolerance in Spain. trans Thomas Parker. London: W and F.G. Cush. 1853.
“History of the Byzantine Empire, from 716 to 1057.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 20, no. 235: (July 1853): 443–44.
        States that this work has a clear and vigorous style, makes use of many excellent sources, and presents good data in a well arranged fashion. Reviewed: Finlay, George. History of the Byzantine Empire, from 716 to 1057. London and Edinburgh: William Blackwood and Sons. 1853.
Kemble, John Mitchell.“History of the Prussian Court and Aristocracy, and of the Prussian Diplomacy.” Fraser’s Magazine, 48, no. 283: (July 1853): 59–70.
        ‘Although full of repetitions and useless detail’, this book has afforded the reviewer ‘much amusement’. Author is Edward Vehse; actual title is Geschichte des Preussischen Hofs and Adels, und der Preussischen Diplomatie (9 vols, 1851). {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“HISTORY OF A CONTRIBUTOR.” Chambers’s, 0, no. 500: (30 July 1853): 72–74.
        Brief account of the latter part of the life of journalist Thomas Griffiths Wainewright (1794-1842) a contributor to the London Magazine. He is accused of being a serial poisoner.
“History and Romance of Life Assurance.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 20, no. 236: (August 1853): 456–63.
        Reviewer mostly offers content and excerpts but does state that this work is interesting and useful, and offers detailed information on many important topics. Reviewed: Francis, John. Annals, Anecdotes, and Legend: A Chronicle of Life Assurance. London: Longman and Co. 1853.
Froude, James Anthony.“History of Scotland, from the Revolution to the Extinction of the Last Jacobite Insurrection.” Fraser’s Magazine, VOLUME 48, AUGUST 1853: (August 1853): 127–42.
        Review of J. H. Burton’s book, 2 volumes, published by Longman. Admires the author’s style and approach, and provides lengthy excerpts and commentary. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Kaye, John William (Sir).“The Administration of the East India Company; a History of Indian Progress.” North British, 19, no. 38: (August 1853): 552–82.
        This review of twelve different works on the subject of the Indian governing bodies offers a discussion of the subject and offers the similar and differing views that the different authors present If the Wellesley Index attribution is correct, Kaye is reviewing two of his own works.
Froude, James Anthony.“Morals of Queen Elizabeth (First Paper).” Fraser’s Magazine, VOLUME 48, OCTOBER 1853: (October 1853): 371–87.
        First of a 2-part historical essay with comments on the approaches to the subject of W. B. Devereux and Lingard, and references to Harris Nicolas’s edition of the memoirs of Sir Christopher Hatton.  (Attribution: Wellesley Index).
“Rodwell’s Child’s First Step to the History of England.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 20, no. 238: (October 1853): 632.
        States that this work contains excellent engravings and is simply written which is beneficial to its target audience of children. Reviewed: [Anne] Rodwell. Child’s First Step to the History of England. London: Hall, Virtue, and Co. 1853.
“The Panthropheon; or, History of Food and Its Preparation, from the Earliest Ages of the World.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 20, no. 238: (October 1853): 637.
        Announcement of a well-researched and interesting work , noting that space constraints prevent further discussion. Reviewed: Soyer, A. The Panthropheon; or, History of Food and its Preparation, from the Earliest Ages of the World. London: Simpkin, Marshall, and Co. 1853.
Brewster, David (Sir).“A History of the Royal Society,with Memoirs of the Presidents, Compiled from Authentic Documents.” North British, 20, no. 39: (November 1853): 209–47.
        Offers a detailed discussion of the subject matter and the content of Charles Richard Weld’s 1848 work, and states that Weld collected valuable matter and offers a work of interest to both specialists and generalists. Attribution Wellesley Index.
Froude, James Anthony.“Morals of Queen Elizabeth. Second Article.” Fraser’s Magazine, VOLUME 48, NOVEMBER 1853: (November 1853): 489–505.
        Continuation of the essay begun in the previous issue, and conclusion that questioning of the Queen’s morality is based on faulty evidence.  (Attribution: Wellesley Index).
Price, Edward.“A History and Description of Westminster Abbey.” Dublin Review, 35, no. 70: (December 1853): 524.
        Briefly discusses the content of the book and states that it is cheap and useful. Publisher is Richardson and Son. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“Ancient History.” Dublin Review, 35, no. 70: (December 1853): 531–32.
        States that this book, by Peter Fredet, fulfills all that a book of this nature should; it is a skilfully connected narrative, carefully arranged, and truthful and accurate. Publisher is Dolman.
“History of the War of the Sicilian Vespers.” Fraser’s Magazine, 48, no. 288: (December 1853): 679–88.
        Review of a book on the 1282 event, author is Michele Amari; this edition has an introduction and commentary by Lord Ellesmere (published by Bentley).
“Outlines of Universal History.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 20, no. 240: (December 1853): 759.
        States that this small compendium is useful to the students for whom it is intended , and also for general readers. Reviewed: White, Henry. Outlines of Universal History. London: Simpkin, Marshall, and Co. Edinburgh: Oliver and Boyd. 1853.
Freeman, E. A.“The Lives of the Queens of England, &c.” Quarterly, VOLUME 95, JUNE, 1854: (1854): 207–49.
        Here Freeman uses his authorial anonymity to discuss Queen Elizabeth (a very ‘national’ sovereign), her personal life, and her ‘favourites’. As for Strickland, her style and intellect are found wanting, and she is judged inaccurate and partial; nevertheless her work is valuable to serious historical students because it contains copious extracts from little-known primary sources. Reviewed: Agnes Strickland, Lives of the Queens of England. Vols 6 and 7. 1843, and other works. Attribution Wellesley Review; picked up for HBooks by contributor search.
“A Catholic History of England (Vol 3).” Dublin Review, 36, no. 71: (March 1854): 259–61.
        Preliminary announcement of this volume of William Bernhard McCabe’s work. Recommended to Catholic students of English history as it has a judicious method and provides an original history. Publisher is Newby.
“Turkey; or, a History of the Origin, Progress, and Decline of the Ottoman Empire.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 21, no. 244: (April 1854): 252.
        States that this work is well put together, contains many useful and well-researched facts, and contains useful maps with excellent notes. Reviewed: Fowler, G. Turkey; or, a History of the Origin, Progress, and Decline of the Ottoman Empire.
Tait, Archibald Campbell.“General History of the Christian Religion and Church.” North British, 21, no. 41: (May 1854): 101–36.
        Uses this work by Augustus Neander to aid in the current criticism of religious truths and faith. States that this work is useful to learned readers and would be beneficial if an edition were prepared and directed at general readers. Also claims that the author was at times not impartial in examining certain characters. Publisher is T&T Clark, 1847; translator is Joseph Torry. Attribution Wellesley Index.
Masson, David.“History of Scotland, from the Revolution to the Extinction of the Last Jacobite Insurrection, (1689-1748.).” North British, 21, no. 41: (May 1854): 69–100.
        In a review of John Hill Burton’’s 1853 book , Masson discusses the relationship and interaction between Scotland and England. Attribution Wellesley Index.
Stanley, A. P.“History of Latin Christianity; Including That of the Popes to the Pontificate of Nicolas V.” Quarterly, 95, no. 189: (June 1854): 38–70.
        Moderate praise for this book by the Dean of St Paul’s Cathedral. But there is ‘a certain monotony of sentiment’ and ‘an abruptness and carelessness of composition’. Reviewed: Milman, Henry Hart. History of Latin Christianity; including that of the Popes to the Pontificate of Nicolas V. Vol. I, II, III. 1854.{attribution Wellesley Index}.
Russell, Charles William.“History of Oliver Cromwell and the English Commonwealth, from the Execution of Charles the First to the Death of Cromwell.” Dublin Review, 36, no. 72: (June 1854): 494–520.
        Reviewer expressed distaste for L. Guizot’s views overall and states that this work does not contain anything new; offers a evaluation of the content; compares Guizot to past historians who have written on the same subject. Publisher is Bentley. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Mansfield, Horatio.“History and Progress of the Temperance Reformation in Great Britain and Other Countries of the Globe, &c.; and a Plea for a Maine Law.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 21, no. 248: (August 1854): 503.
        States that this work is written in a clear and masterly style and that facts not words are the argument. Reviewed: Buckingham, James Silk. History and Progress of the Temperance Reformation in Great Britain and other Countries of the Globe, &c.; and a Plea for a Maine Law. London: Partridge, Oakey, and Co. 1854.
Freeman, Edward Augustus.“Lectures on Ancient History, from the Earliest Times to the Taking of Alexandria by Octavianus; Comprising the History of the Asiatic Nations, the Egyptians, Greeks, Macedonians, and Carthaginians.” North British, 21, no. 42: (August 1854): 425–50.
        States that Niebuhr needs no praise, is clear and perspicuous, and writes with passion. Freeman adds that Thirlwall writes and presents information skillfully. He also compares the works of the authors and the ideas and attitudes of each. 1853 edition translated by Leonhard Schmitz. Attribution Wellesley Index.
Mansfield, Horatio.“History of the Ottoman Empire, from the Earliest Period to the Present Time.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 21, no. 249: (September 1854): 569.
        States that this work is a careful and conscientious summary of the most important events and is brief enough to be read by the general reader but is nevertheless detailed and comprehensive. Reviewed: Deans, William. History of the Ottoman Empire, from the Earliest Period to the Present Time. London and Edinburgh: Fullarton and Co. 1854.
Mansfield, Horatio.“Ince’s Outlines of English History.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 21, no. 249: (September 1854): 570.
        States that this work does what it promises, to give pupils an accurate knowledge of events in English history. Reviewed: Ince. Outlines of English History. London: Gilbert. 1854. new edition.
Gibson, William Sydney.“The Bell: Its Origin, History, and Uses.” Quarterly, 95, no. 190: (September 1854): 308–37.
        Am essay on the subject of the books under review. Reviewed: Gatty, Rev. Alfred. The Bell: its Origin, History, and Uses. 1848. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Mansfield, Horatio.“History of Scotland, from the Earliest Period to the Present Time.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 21, no. 250: (October 1854): 634.
        States that this work is interesting, full of facts, impartial, and contains useful illustration; all the things a text book should be. Also states that it should have a place in every school library. Reviewed: History of Scotland, from the Earliest Period to the Present Time. ed. Henry White. Edinburgh: Oliver and Boyd, London: Simpkin, Marshall, and Co. 1854.
Rawstorne, William Edward.“History of Latin Christianity; Including That of the Popes, to the Pontificate of Nicolas V.” North British, 22, no. 43: (November 1854): 84–112.
        States that Henry Hart Milman’s work is honest, carefully researched, well-written and offers candid and impartial judgement. However, Rawstone adds that Milman does not engage in the process of inquiry but merely offers the results and hence this work is incomplete as it omits essential topics of discussion. Attribution Wellesley Index.
Abraham, George Whitely.“A Catholic History of England (Vol 3).” Dublin Review, 37, no. 74: (December 1854): [273]-287.
        Full review examines the content of third volume of this book by William Berhard MacCabe and the historical influences on the author. Publisher is Newby. Attribution Wellesley Index.
“History of French Literature in the Eighteenth Century.” Dublin Review, 37, no. 74: (December 1854): 524–25.
        Author is Alexander Vinet; translator is James Bryce. Claims that any value this work may have had is lost in its translation. Publisher is Clark of Edinburgh.
“The Naval Heroes of Great Britain, Their History and Achievements.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 0, no. 0: (December 1854): 754.
        States that this biographical sketch of the most important sea captains is clever and acceptable. Reviewed: The Naval Heroes of Great Britain, their History and Achievements. London: Clarke and Beeton. 1854.
“Nineveh and Its Ruins: Or, the History of the Great City.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 22, no. 0: (January 1855): 61.
        Claims that this work is a clever summary of interesting facts and does a great job of connecting the past with the excavated remains. Also states that the engravings are well done. Reviewed: Ferguson, Rev. Robert. Nineveh and its Ruins: or, the History of the Great City. London: Partridge, Oakey, and Co. 1855.
“OLIVER CROMWELL.” Boy’s Own Magazine, 1: (4 January 1855): 97.
        Biography of Oliver Cromwell, born in Huntingdon in 1599. The author details his education, his marriage, and early career in politics, and involvement in the Parliamentary army. The author debates whether Cromwell had the ability to save the king, and claims that he died, ‘the greatest Englishman’ in 1658.
“Massey’s History of England.” Fraser’s Magazine, 51, no. 302: (February 1855): [129]-146.
        Reviews first volume of William Massey’s work, A History of England during the Reign of George III (published by Parker, 1855), with the observation that England has many fewer historians than France.
“A History of India under the Two First Sovereigns of the House of Taimur, Baber and Humayun.” Dublin Review, 38, no. 75: (March 1855): 256–58.
        Briefly examines the content of the book by William Erskine; claims that it is put together with care, well-researched, and offers an excellent and judicious order. Publisher is Longman, 1854.
“Abridgment of the History of England.” Dublin Review, 38, no. 75: (March 1855): 254.
        Lingard’s history, continued by James Burke. States that the book is judicious and agreeable and that Burke’s continuation, though brief, is elegant and helps a remarkable narrative to remain one of the most valuable on the topic. Publisher is Dolman.
“An Abridged History of England (7th Ed).” Dublin Review, 38, no. 75: (March 1855): 256.
        States that the merits of this book, by W. Fl. Mylius, are well known; reviewer is happy to see a seventh edition. Publisher is Derby: Richardson and Son, of Dublin.
Walford, Edward.“Ince’s Outlines of English History.” Dublin Review, 38, no. 75: (March 1855): 262.
        Claims that Henry Ince’s book is fair and impartial and is the best book for youths on the topic, because it does not contain any of the usual anti-Catholic remarks. Publisher is J. Gilbert. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Froude, James Anthony.“Four Years at the Court of Henry VIII.” Fraser’s Magazine, VOLUME 51, APRIL 1855: (April 1855): 441–54.
        Review of a selection of despatches from the Venetian ambassador to England, translated by Rowdon Brown and published by Smith Elder in 1854. Froude comments on the strengths and weaknesses of primary documents for gaining an understanding of the past.  (Attribution: Wellesley Index).
Mansfield, Horatio.“Wanderings in Corsica: Its History and Its Heroes.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 0, no. 0: (April 1855): 243–45.
        Focuses mainly on the content of the work, providing several excerpts but does state that the translation is well done and offers an agreeable style for readers. Reviewed: Gregorovius, Ferdinand. Wanderings in Corsica: its History and its Heroes. trans. Alexander Muir. Edinburgh: Constable and Co.
Gainsford, Robert John.“History of the United States of America, from the Discovery of the American Continent.” Dublin Review, 38, no. 76: (June 1855): [273]-299.
        Offers a discussion of the content of George Bancroft’s history, focusing specifically upon questions of religious tolerance; states that this work is concise, accurate, and interesting. Publisher is Routledge and Co., 1851. Attribution Wellesley Index.
Jeffrey, Francis.“Lingard’s History of England: St. Thomas of Canterbury (Vols 1-3).” Dublin Review, 38, no. 76: (June 1855): 355–413.
        Focuses mainly on the content of the book, also noting what other historians have said about St. Thomas. Publisher is Dolman. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Watson, Christopher Knight.“Spanish Conquest in America.” Saturday Review, 1, no. 6: (21 July 1855): 700–702.
        First notice of Arthur Helps’s book (2 vol, J. W. Parker) providing lengthy excerpts. Attribution Curran Index.
Freeman, Edward Augustus.“A History of India under the Two First Sovereigns of the House of Taimur, Baber and Humayu.” North British, 23, no. 46: (August 1855): 449–80.
        With very few references to William Erskine’s 1854 book or the other works ostensibly under review, Freeman discusses Islam (‘Mohametanism’) in detail by looking at its history and its interaction with other faiths. He offers some discussion of other religions and their interaction with each other and with Islam. Attribution Wellesley Index.
“A Manual of Ancient History, from the Remotest Times to the Overthrow of the Western Empire, A.D. 476.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 0, no. 0: (August 1855): 506–7.
        States that this work is a precise and beautiful presentation of history. Reviewed: Schmitz, Leonhard. A Manual of Ancient History, from the Remotest Times to the Overthrow of the Western Empire, A.D. 476. Edinburgh: E. and A. Black.
Lorimer, James.“History of Holland from the Beginning of the Tenth to the End of the Eighteenth Century.” North British, 23, no. 46: (August 1855): 422–48.
        The review focuses on nine works (beginning with C. M. Davies’ 1842 work on Holland) on varying topics of British international relations, diplomacy, and international law. Attribution Wellesley Index.
“CARDINAL WOLSEY.” Boy’s Own Magazine, 1: (1 August 1855): 255.
        Biography of Thomas Wolsey, born in Ipswich in 1471. The author explains he did not gain favour because of his proper behaviour, but because of his attainments and noble appearance. The author details his achievements before his death in 1530.
“THE TRUE HISTORY OF COUNT CAGLIOSTRO.” Chambers’s, 0, no. 88: (8 September 1855): 156–58.
        The life of Count Cagliostro (Joseph Balsamo) 1743-1795, alchemist and forger, who travelled around Europe and was arrested many times.
“Niebuhr and Lewis on the Early Roman History.” Fraser’s Magazine, 52, no. 310: (October 1855): 455–69.
        Authors are Reinhold Niebuhr and G. Cornewall Lewis; Lewis’s book is An Inquiry into the Credibility of Early Roman History (2 vol. published J. W. Parker), described as ‘a monument of accurate erudition and conscientious investigation.’
“The Early History of Russia.” Fraser’s Magazine, 52, no. 311: (November 1855): 573–87.
        Reprint of a 17th-century French memoir by Captain Margeret, edited by Henri Chevreuil; publisher is Williams & Norgate. Title is Estat de l’Empire de Russie et Grand Duche de Moscovie, avec ce qui s’y est passe de plus memorable et tragique, pendant le regne de quatre Empereurs: a scauoir depuis l’an 1590: jusques en l’an 1606, en Septembre.
Venables, Georg Stovin.“History of France in the Sixteenth Century.” Saturday Review, 1, no. 4: (24 November 1855): 65–67.
        Michelet is praised for being a skillful and brilliant narrator but criticized for his ‘bold discretion in the selection of facts.’ Overall, this French-language edition is ‘well worth reading.’ Attribution Curran Index.
Donne, William Bodham.“Reign of Philip the Second of Spain.” Saturday Review, 1, no. 4: (24 November 1855): 68–69.
        Reviewer claims William H. Prescott’s work is a substantial addition to the history of the era as it is well-researched and well-written.
Finlason, William Francis.“History of France.” Dublin Review, 39, no. 78: (December 1855): 505–6.
        States that this ‘semi-infidel’ work by E. De Bonnechose should never have been approved by the Royal Council of Public Instruction; then offers an example of some of the content to support the argument. Publisher is Routledge. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Finlason, William Francis.“History of the Catholic Missions among the Indian Tribes of the United States, 1529-1854.” Dublin Review, 39, no. 78: (December 1855): 524.
        Claims that this book by John Shea is interesting and well-researched. Publisher is Dunigan, of New York.
“Prescott’s History of the Reign of Philip II.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 0, no. 0: (December 1855): 732–41.
        States that this work offers a candid and discriminating examination of documents, is impartial, and has a clear and vigorous style. However its arrangement is not chronological and fragmentary. The reviewer spends much provides a detailed discussion of the content. Reviewed: Prescott. History of the Reign of Philip II. London: Bentley. See also January 1856.
Finlason, William Francis.“The Constitutional History of England.” Dublin Review, 39, no. 78: (December 1855): 503.
        Very critical of Henry Hallam’s ritualistic bias and “almost morbid impatience of all authority”. Publisher is John Murray.
“The Crimea: Its Ancient and Modern History.” Dublin Review, 39, no. 78: (December 1855): 497.
        States that this book by the Rev Thomas Milner is not complete (and the author realizes this) and it is likely that a more vivid picture of this topic will likely be be written when more is known . Meanwhile, however, this work leaves little to be desired. Publisher is Longman.
Finlason, William Francis.“The History of England (Vol 3. 5th Ed).” Dublin Review, 39, no. 78: (December 1855): 328–84.
        Offers a detailed discussion of the content of Lingard’s book. Publisher is Dolman, 1849. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Stephen, James Fitzjames.“Political History of the United States.” Saturday Review, 1, no. 6: (8 December 1855): 101–2.
        Edouard Laboulaye’s 1855 book is discussed in terms of how democracy is possible; reviewer says it presents a clear and spirited style and a valuable arrangement. Attribution Curran Index.
Mansfield, Robert Blachford.“The French Revolution.” Saturday Review, 1, no. 6: (8 December 1855): 98–99.
        Review of Louis Blanc’s 7th volume discusses past historians’ work on the revolution (Lactretelle, Thiers, Barante, Michelet) and then discusses the content of this book, which spans from 1792 to the trial of the king. Attribution Curran Index.
Freeman, E. A.“Gallenga’s History of Piedmont.” Saturday Review, 1, no. 7: (15 December 1855): 120–21.
        States that Antonio Gallenga’s narrative is graphic, is written in a “violent anti-ecclesiastical spirit” and that the author should have focused on the history of the house of Savoy and not extended his researches to Rome and Gaul. Book published by Chapman & Hall. Attribution Curran Index.
Donne, William Bodham.“History of Rome.” Saturday Review, 1, no. 7: (15 December 1855): 116–17.
        States that Henry G. Liddell’s book (2 vol, Murray) is for general readers, that it is well arranged, and that it shows much diligence and scholarship. Would also be useful a reference book for students cramming for examinations. Attribution Curran Index.
Venables, Georg Stovin.“Thiers on History.” Saturday Review, 1, no. 7: (15 December 1855): 115–16.
        The occasion is volume 12 of Thiers’s The Consulate and the Empire. Article focuses on the perceived role of historians, stating that they must be intelligent and content to efface themselves in their work; historians are, in essence, artists. Attribution Curran Index.
Stephen, James Fitzjames.“Sir Archibald Alison.” Saturday Review, 1, no. 8: (22 December 1855): 137–39.
        States that the style of Alison’s History of Europe 1789-1815 (9th edition in 11 volumes, published by Blackwood) is the result of the fundamental fault of his history. Although the work is honest, impartial, and truthful, it is also hasty, inaccurate and illogical. Refers to the railway edition of this work, and to Alison rivalling Dickens in popularity. Attribution Curran Index.
Venables, Georg Stovin.“Macaulay’s History of England.” Saturday Review, 1, no. 9: (29 December 1855): 156–57.
        First of three parts. ‘The age of the Revolution has at last found its Homer’. Notes that some might feel it covers too short a period (9 years) and Macaulay only considered and used facts that were most effective and suited to his argument. However, the work is beautifully written, clear, pointed, and decided. Attribution Curran Index.
“Macaulay’s History of England.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 23, no. 0: (January 1856): 45–54.
        Reviewer offers a summary of the content (if Volumes I and II) and many excerpts, noting that the work reads like a romance, contains good evidence, is well-written, and is overall a magnificent historical work. Reviewed: Macaulay. History of England. vol. III & IV. London: Longman and Co.
“Prescott’s History of the Reign of Philip II.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 23, no. 0: (January 1856): 29–37.
        Continuing from December 1855, the reviewer reminds readers that this work is well done despite its fragmentary arrangement and focuses mostly on offering the reader an summary of the content. Reviewed: Prescott. History of the Reign of Philip II. London: Bentley.
Harcourt, William George Granville Venables.“JOURNALISM v. HISTORY.” Saturday Review, 1, no. 10: (5 January 1856): 168–69.
        Discusses how recent accounts of conflicts, by writers in The Times, should contain more historical accuracy. Attribution Curran Index.
Venables, Georg Stovin.“Macaulay’s History of England.” Saturday Review, 1, no. 10: (5 January 1856): 173–74.
        Second notice discusses the content which focuses on James and on William and Mary. Attribution Curran Index.
Stephen, James Fitzjames.“Pious Frauds.” Saturday Review, 1, no. 10: (5 January 1856): 174–76.
        Criticizes three books by Stephen Watson Fullom for their inaccuracy and far-fetched arguments. History of Women is ‘an insult to the sex’. Attribution Curran Index.
“HISTORY OF STRAWBERRY STREET.” Chambers’s, 0, no. 106: (12 January 1856): 25–28.
        This account of the 30 year history of a London street traces its development from a quiet and quaint locale to a bustling and populated area. Examines some notable people who lived on or were associated with the street.
“Jeanne D’Albret, Queen of Navarre.” Saturday Review, 1, no. 11: (12 January 1856): 196–97.
        Readable biography by Martha Walker Froer (2 vol, 1855) is an ‘acceptable supplement to the annals of one of the most important periods of the ancient French monarchy.’
Venables, Edmond.“Macaulay’s History of England.” Saturday Review, 1, no. 11: (12 January 1856): 191–92.
        Conclusion of a three-part ‘notice’ remains enthusiastic; because of his style, Macaulay has taught people who would never have read history before to enjoy it. Attribution Curran Index.
“Keightley’s Life of Milton.” Saturday Review, 1, no. 12: (19 January 1856): 211.
        Thomas Keightley’s book (Chapman & Hall, 1855) is a well-judged and valuable contribution to readers’ acquaintance with Milton.
Watson, Christopher Knight.“Spanish Conquest in America. Vols 1 & 2.” Saturday Review, 1, no. 12: (19 January 1856): 215–16.
        Arthur Helps’s book (published by J. W. Parker) reveals the evils of the Spanish conquest; he searches within the events to uncover the origin of the problems. Contains good maps and illustrations which help readers. Attribution Curran Index.
Stephen, James Fitzjames.“WOODS v. RUSSELL.” Saturday Review, 1, no. 12: (19 January 1856): 212–14.
        Sarcastically characterizes Crimea journalists N. A. Woods (History of the Late Campaign, Longman 1855) and W. H. R. Russell (History of the War, Routledge 1855) as ‘great historians’’. States that Woods’s style is noisy, clever, and showy. Attribution Curran Index.
“Macaulay’s History of England.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 0, no. 0: (February 1856): 70–77.
        This continuation of the review (covering volumes III and IV) reiterates that this work is written with a beautiful style, contains impartial and careful judgement, and has the evidence is both well-collected and well-used. The reviewer also points out some erroneous statements, but observes that for such a large work there are not many errors. Also points out that many groups have been angered by this work including the Whigs, the Tories and the Roman Catholics but states that this is to be expected when a truthful history is presented. Reviewed: Macaulay. History of England. vol. III & IV. London: Longman and Co.
Kemble, John Mitchell.“Macaulay’s History of England, Vols 3 & 4.” Fraser’s Magazine, 53, no. 314: (February 1856): 147–64.
        A respectful review, which also comments on the reception of the first two volumes and the popularity of the work in general. Kemble takes issue with Macaulay on a number of points.  (Attribution: Wellesley Index).
Hannah, John.“The History of the High School of Edinburgh.” North British, 24, no. 48: (February 1856): 359–85.
        Examines six works, using them to discuss the history and progress of the educational system in Edinburgh. Attribution Wellesley Index.
Hayman, John Marshall.“Milner’s Russia.” Saturday Review, 1, no. 14: (2 February 1856): 255–56.
        Full title of Thomas Milner’s book is Russia: Its Rise and Progress, Tragedies and Revelations. Review is scathing (even after the publication of an anticipated second volume, it will not be shorter, cheaper, or demonstrate more industry that Russian histories that already exist and it is inferior in style). Reviewer notes that the book originated as articles in the periodical Leisure Hour.. Attribution Curran Index.
Stephen, James Fitzjames.“Beaumarchais and His Times.” Saturday Review, 1, no. 15: (9 February 1856): 278–80.
        Louis de Loménie’s book is described as interesting, and a valuable contribution to the history of French society before the Revolution. Review continues two weeks later. Attribution Curran Index.
Donne, William Bodham.“Milman’s Latin Christianity.” Saturday Review, 1, no. 15: (9 February 1856): 277–78.
        Henry Hart Milman’s book (6 volumes, Murray, 1854-5) is praised for erudition, piety, liberality and judgement. The reviewer notices ‘a certain rugged negligence’ of style, it is not soon to be superseded. Attribution Curran Index.
Mansfield, Robert Blachford.“Madame De Longueville.” Saturday Review, 1, no. 16: (16 February 1856): 302–4.
        This is one of a series of biographies by Victor Cousin. Full title is The Youth of Madame de Longueville, from the French of Victor Cousin, by F. W. Ricord (published by Appleton). Attribution Curran Index.
Stephen, James Fitzjames.“Life and Times of Beaumarchais.” Saturday Review, 1, no. 17: (23 February 1856): 322–24.
        Continuation from the issue of 9 February. Attribution Curran Index.
Donne, William Bodham.“Milman’s Latin Christianity.” Saturday Review, 1, no. 17: (23 February 1856): 324–25.
        Second notice continues review begun in February 9 issue. Attribution Curran Index.
Lewes, George Henry.“Sir A. Alison on German Literature.” Saturday Review, 1, no. 17: (23 February 1856): 326–27.
        This review of Alison’s book on German literature is incorrectly designated by SR as a review of his History of Europe 1815-1852. Scathing critique of verbiage and inaccuracy; this book does not consider what readers already know, it is clear that the author does not understand the language of the literature he instructs of in this work; it is an overall foolish and false chapter in historical writing. Attribution Curran Index.
Bunbury, E. H.“An Inquiry into the Credibility of the Early Roman History.” Quarterly, 98, no. 196: (March 1856): 321–52.
        Acknowledges the influence of Niebuhr on the field, and engages with Lewis’s skepticism with respect to trustworthy evidence for this ancient period. Reviewed: Lewis, Sir George Cornewall. An Inquiry into the Credibility of the Early Roman History. 1855. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Finlason, William Francis.“Dr. Lingard’s History of England (Vols 6 & 7).” Dublin Review, 41, no. 81: (March 1856): 1–27.
        Discusses in detail the content of these volumes dedicated to the Reformation. Publisher is Dolman. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Finlason, William Francis.“Lingard’s History of England (Vol 4 & 5, 6th Ed).” Dublin Review, 40, no. 79: (March 1856): 1–66.
        Offers a detailed discussion of the content . Publisher is Dolman. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Russell, Charles William.“The History of England from the Accession of James the Second (Vols3 & 4).” Dublin Review, 40, no. 79: (March 1856): 156–200.
        Examines the claims and content of this work and states that, although Macaulay displays reckless partisanship, his work is brilliant, striking, and eloquent and that the author is a calm and philosophical historian. Publisher is Longman, 1855. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“Spanish Conquest in America. Vol 3.” Saturday Review, 1, no. 8: (14 March 1856)
        Review of volume 3 of Arthur Helps’s book (J. W. Parker) says it is deeper and shows greater ease and mastery of the subject -- ‘the most entertaining book yet written on Spanish America’.
Sandars, Thomas Collett.“Knights and Their Days.” Saturday Review, 1, no. 20: (15 March 1856): 396–97.
        Scathing review of this ’example of ‘bookmaking’ by John Doran. Reviewer says it is full of useless information about the chivalrous age, but fears it will find a market. Published by Bentley, 1856. Attribution Curran Index.
Sandars, Thomas Collett.“Grote’s History of Greece.” Saturday Review, 1, no. 21: (22 March 1856): 415–16.
        Reviewer of the twelfth and final volume of George Grote’s book (published by Murray, 1856) says it demonstrates that the historian has advanced the world’s knowledge about Greek antiquities and the work is never commonplace, negligent, or weak. Attribution Curran Index.
“The Rise of the Dutch Republic.” Saturday Review, 1, no. 21: (22 March 1856): 418–19.
        Review states that John Lothrop Motley is diligent, spirited, and enthusiastic about the topic. Some of the treatment, however, is judged to be inconsistent with the judicial solemnity of the historian. Attribution Curran Index.
Lewes, George Henry.“The History of Ancient Philosophy.” Saturday Review, 1, no. 23: (5 April 1856): 460–61.
        Reviewer finds that these posthumous lectures were ‘creditable’ to William Archer Butler, but notes the lack of treatment of Socrates and Plato. Attribution Curran Index.
Sandars, Thomas Collett.“Guizot’s Richard Cromwell and the Restoration.” Saturday Review, 1, no. 24: (12 April 1856): 477–78.
        François Guizot is described as a patient investigator who respects the agency of historical figures and provides a clear exposition of the facts. Book translated by Andrew R. S. Scoble, published Bentley, 1856. Attribution Curran Index.
“Marlborough and Wellington.” Saturday Review, 1, no. 25: (19 April 1856): 506.
        Reviewer of this dual biography draws attention to the blindness of the author, James E. W. E. Gascoyne-Cecil, Viscount Cranborne. He comprehends the doings, sympathizes with the genius, and shares the progress of his fellows. Published London: John Mitchell.
Sandars, Thomas Collett.“Froude’s History of England. Vols 1 & 2.” Saturday Review, 1, no. 26: (26 April 1856): 520–21.
        First of two notices: Froude can write both good English and good narrative, and he makes reflections that are neither truisms or paradoxes. But his judgement is impaired by partiality towards the Protestant cause. Attribution Curran Index.
Freeman, Edward Augustus.“A History of Greece.” North British, 25, no. 49: (May 1856): 141–72.
        This review focuses on Grote’s history of Athenian Democracy and states that this work is extensive, original, and demonstrates points with clarity, truthfulness and with practicality. Also commends Grote for always arguing and never assuming or insinuating. However, states that at times his views could be biased, his style was heavy and diffused and lacked simplicity and dignity, and that the narrative at times lacked eloquence and detail. Also claims that Grote is a great historian not a great Greek scholar. Grote, George. A History of Greece. 12 volumes. London, 1846-56. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Greg, William Rathbone.“The History of England, from the Accession of James II.” North British, 25, no. 49: (May 1856): 79–109.
        Reviewing volumes 3 and 4 of Macaulay’s book, which appeared in 1855, Greg states that the work is beyond review, noting that it has brilliant style, its writing and research is yet to be surpassed and that it must hold its ground forever. He nevertheless notes the author’s biases, concluding that the book’s benefits and usefulness far surpass its faults and discrepancies. Attribution Wellesley Index.
Sandars, Thomas Collett.“Froude’s History of England.” Saturday Review, 2, no. 27: (3 May 1856): 17–19.
        Second notice: Continues to note Froude’s fine writing and poor historical judgement. Attribution Curran Index.
Donne, William Bodham.“Merivale’s Rome. Vols 4 & 5.” Saturday Review, 2, no. 27: (3 May 1856): 14–16.
        Charles Merivale’s book is described as a full and faithful picture of Rome despite ‘treacherous ground underlying statements of Tiberius, Caisus, and Claudius.’ Publisher is Longman. Attribution Curran Index.
“Modern Society in Rome.” Saturday Review, 2, no. 28: (10 May 1856): 44–45.
        This book by J.Richard Beste (published Hurst & Blackett, 1856) is described as a hybrid of fiction and history; the reviewer finds it a feeble, insipid, worthless production, which does not deliver on its promises.
“Scottish Heroes in the Days of Wallace and Bruce.” Saturday Review, 2, no. 29: (17 May 1856): 70–71.
        Alexander Low’s book is not informative about its subjects and fails to realize the merit of sources or how to use and interpret them.
Freeman, E. A.“Creasy’s History of the Ottoman Turks.” Saturday Review, 2, no. 30: (24 May 1856): 88–89.
        Surveys E. A. Creasy’s merits, but also finds ‘carelessness and party spirit’, and is troubled by the author’s moving into current events, rather than limiting himself to history. Notes that the book is ‘got up’ by Bentley ‘in a handsome but not a scholar-like form -- one adapted for the drawing-room rather than the library’. Attribution Curran Index.
Smith, William.“A History of Greece.” Quarterly, 99, no. 197: (June 1856): 60–105.
        Commentary and praise for the full 12-volume work. Observes that Grote is qualified by his personal knowledge of political and business life (something lacking in the work of ‘the most learned Germans’); Reviewed: Grote, George. A History of Greece. 1846-1856. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Russell, Charles William.“History of Latin Christianity, Including That of the Popes to the Pontificate of Nicholas V.” Dublin Review, 40, no. 80: (June 1856): [5]-23.
        Examines the content and viewpoints of this book by Henry Hart Milman; states that it is not beyond the level of an essay as it focuses on one view and the events, characters, and records are all in support of that view. Also observes that although Milman is a calm and philosophical writer he is passionless and partisan. Publisher is John Murray, 1855.
Crolly, George.“History of the Reign of Philip the Second, King of Spain (Vols 1 & 2).” Dublin Review, 40, no. 80: (June 1856): 454–81.
        Discusses the content of W. H. Prescott’s book; states that although the author’s style has improved in this work he does not have the materials, industry or impartiality to write a narrative on this topic and that he is ignorant and inaccurate in his views. Publisher is Richard Bentley, 1855. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Abraham, George Whitely.“The Constitutional History of England, from the Accession of Henry VII. to the Death of George II.” Dublin Review, 40, no. 80: (June 1856): 392–417.
        States that although Henry Hallam’s work is honest and candid, it contains useless and hurtful content, unsound arguments, bold assertions, and prejudiced writing. The reviewer looks at some of Hallam’s claims and compares his work to that of Macaulay. Publisher is John Murray, 1855. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“The Pictorial Bible and Church History Stories.” Dublin Review, 40, no. 80: (June 1856): 543–45.
        Reviews the first two of a projected 7-part series by Henry Formby (published Burns & Lambert). Praises the work for careful and complete execution and good illustrations, unusual in a Catholic history.
Freeman, E. A.“Greece Under the Ottomans.” Saturday Review, 2, no. 35: (28 June 1856): 206–7.
        Compares George Finlay’s work favourably to that of Creasy. This is not written for the popular marketplace, or with current affairs in mind, but advances Finlay’s reputation for learned historical research and writing. Attribution Curran Index.
“The Old Regime and the Revolution.” Saturday Review, 2, no. 35: (28 June 1856): 202–3.
        Review of Paris edition of Alexis de Toqueville’s work says it demonstrates how the ‘germs of democracy were nourished in the nation long before the Revolution’. It has great merit as a historical study as it uses numerous forgotten records as evidence.
“A History of the Romans under the Empire.” London Review, 6, no. 12: (July 1856): 485–93.
        Review of Volumes 1-v of Merivale’s history, admiring the ambition of the work. Publisher is Longman.
“History and Conquests of the Saracens.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 0, no. 0: (July 1856): 448.
        States that this set of six lectures presented at the Philosophical Institute of Edinburgh is an intelligent account of Mohammedan history and will be useful to all that are unfamiliar with the subject. Reviewed: Freeman, Edward A. History and Conquests of the Saracens. London: John Henry and James Parker.
“History in Landscape: Seddon’s Pictures.” Saturday Review, 2, no. 37: (12 July 1856): 246–47.
        Meditation on artistic work with historical subject-matter discusses Thomas Seddon’s paintings of Egypt and Palestine.
“Kahnis’s German Protestantism.” Saturday Review, 2, no. 38: (19 July 1856): 277–78.
        While expressing various anti-German prejudices, the reviewer notes that Karl F. A. Kahnis’s book is a valuable contribution to religious history despite its omissions. Translated by T. Meyer; Published Hamilton & Co.
“North American Indian Legends.” Saturday Review, 2, no. 38: (19 July 1856): 273–75.
        Admiring review, full of anthropological reflections, of Henry Schoolcraft’s The Myth of Hiawatha, which contains other legends and myths. Notes the book is designed for students and that it gives the reader feelings of both sorrow and satisfaction. Published by Trubner.
“Frenchmen of Divers Estates.” Saturday Review, 2, no. 39: (26 July 1856): 297–98.
        Reviewer regards this book by Amans Alexis Monteil (4th edition, 5 volumes published Paris: Hachette) as a remarkable monument of research but vast in scope.
Rawstorne, William Edward.“History of the Propagation of Christianity among the Heathen since the Reformation.” North British, 25, no. 50: (August 1856): 314–48.
        Discusses six works in an exploration of the history of Christian missionaries and the propagation of Christianity. Discusses the motives and successes of these missionaries’ conversion attempts. Attribution Wellesley Index.
Freeman, Edward Augustus.“The Rise of the Dutch Republic: A History.” North British, 25, no. 50: (August 1856): 376–98.
        Discusses the political and religious history of the Dutch republic using the work of John Lothrop Motley as a starting point. States that this work is lively, interesting, instructive, and well sourced and researched. Also states that Motley’s style is excellent: clear, vivid, and eloquent. Attribution Wellesley Index.
“Thierry’s History of Attila.” Saturday Review, 2, no. 43: (23 August 1856): 381–82.
        Notes that Amedée Thierry’s work, though pleasantly written, ‘seems like child’s play after Gibbon.’
Sandars, Thomas Collett.“The Marquis De Dangeau.” Saturday Review, 2, no. 44: (30 August 1856): 399–400.
        This volume of Dangeau’s journals (5 volumes, Paris: Didot, 1854-6) is a useful corrective to St Simon’s memoirs. Sanders says it contributes well to the history of Louis XIV. He comments on the overabundance of historical sources for the nineteenth century. Attribution Curran Index.
Abraham, George Whitely.“History of Richard Cromwell and the Restoration of Charles II.” Dublin Review, 41, no. 81: (September 1856): 86–117.
        Discusses the content of M. Guizot’s work in detail and states that it is worthy of praise from Englishmen and students. Publisher is Richard Bentley. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“The History of Sedgley Park School, Staffordshire.” Dublin Review, 41, no. 81: (September 1856): 250.
        States that F. C. Husenbeth preserves important and interesting facts. Publisher is Richardson and Son.
Venables, Georg Stovin.“History of the French Revolution.” Saturday Review, 2, no. 45: (6 September 1856): 422–23.
        Louis Blanc is a good writer but not a historian. Volume 8 of his work published in Paris. Attribution Curran Index.
“The History and Conquests of the Saracens.” Saturday Review, 2, no. 47: (20 September 1856): 470–71.
        Detailed and respectful review of E. A. Freeman’s lectures (published by J.H. & J. Parker). Finds them interesting, vigorous, and truthful.
“The Napoleon Correspondence.” Saturday Review, 2, no. 48: (27 September 1856): 486–87.
        Described as interesting, credibly translated and useful to readers, this review is presented without the name of either editor or translator. Published by John Murray.
Sandars, Thomas Collett.“Memoirs of St. Simon.” Saturday Review, 2, no. 50: (11 October 1856): 526–28.
        This edition is prepared by M. Chevuel and published in Paris by Hachette. Sanders calls St Stimon an excellent writer who is a pleasure to read. Attribution Curran Index.
Stephen, James Fitzjames.“Life of Matthew Robinson.” Saturday Review, 2, no. 51: (18 October 1856): 551–52.
        After a commentary on modern periodical writing, including anonymity, Stephen comments on this second volume of Cambridge in the Seventeenth Century, which is an edition of Robinson’s manuscript autobiography by J. E. B. Mayor. The editor is praised for zeal and industry. Publisher is Macmillan for the Cambridge University Press, 1856. Attribution Curran Index.
“A Guide to Scripture History.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 0, no. 0: (November 1856): 701–2.
        Reviewer mainly discusses the content but also states that this work is valuable and contains interesting points although they are not always well proven. Reviewed: Rev. (Robert Kitton) Brewer. A Guide to Scripture History. London: Jarrold and Sons.
“A Half-Yearly Course of Reading Lessons in English History.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 0, no. 0: (November 1856): 700–701.
        States that this work needed to be concise and therefore the author had to be careful about what to omit; then goes on to complain about how Northern England is ignored and misrepresented and that the account of the Scottish people is misleading. Reviewed: Bithell, Richard. A Half-Yearly Course of Reading Lessons in English History. London: Groombridge and Sons.
Kingsley, Charles.“A History of England from the Fall of Wolsey to the Death of Elizabeth.” North British, 26, no. 51: (November 1856): 72–106.
        Discusses the construction of English history by various historians, then moves on to J. A. Froude’s book. States that this work’s best feature is that Froude connects with his historical characters better than any historian of the past, by demonstrating human motives and passions. Also states that Froude’s work is patient and good tempered when it comes to research. Attribution Wellesley Index.
Watson, Christopher Knight.“Columbus.” Saturday Review, 2, no. 53: (1 November 1856): 597–98.
        Scathing review of a book in French (2 vol, Didier) by Roselly de Lorgues, ‘the first effort of a Frenchman, a European and a Roman Catholic’ on the subject. Mere hagiography, the work has no regard for truth, honesty, common sense, or impartiality and is not recommended. Attribution Curran Index.
Sandars, Thomas Collett.“The Grands-Jours of Auvergne.” Saturday Review, 2, no. 54: (8 November 1856): 619–21.
        This notice reviews an edition of the 17th-century memoirs of Esprit Fléchier. 2nd edition published in Paris. Attribution Curran Index.
Hutton, Richard Holt.“Strauss’s Life of Nicodemus Frischlin.” Saturday Review, 2, no. 55: (15 November 1856): 641–43.
        In the reviewer’s opinion, this biography of a poet and philologist, by David Friedrich Strauss, is not the contribution to German cultural history it claims to be. Published Frankfurt: Rüthen. Attribution Curran Index.
Duff, Mountstuart Elphinstone Grant-.“Cornelius Agrippa.” Saturday Review, 2, no. 56: (22 November 1856): 664–66.
        This ‘diligent’ biography by Henry Morley (published by Chapman & Hall) provides a clear memorial to this hero by showing who he was, what he did, and what he wrote. But there is too much emphasis on minute details. Attribution Curran Index.
Sandars, Thomas Collett.“Mr. Macaulay on Scotland.” Saturday Review, 2, no. 52: (25 November 1856): 569–70.
        Comments on a series of anonymous pamphlets by a Scot, claiming that Scotland was maligned by Macaulay in the History. These remarks are in the context that Scots are very provincial at home, though charming and competent abroad. The article refers to a series of articles in an Edinburgh periodical, the Witness, on the same subject, as well as an article in the September 1856 Blackwood’s. Attribution Curran Index.
“The Girlhood of Catherine De Medici.” Saturday Review, 2, no. 57: (29 November 1856): 688–90.
        Scathing review of Thomas Adolphus Trollope’s biography; ‘his judgment is far too much under the domination of theological prejudice to render him a safe guide’. Published by Chapman & Hall.
“A History of Greece.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 0, no. 0: (December 1856): 704.
        States that this work is an asset to the library of anyone wanting a useful and in-depth look at the history of the people, politics and culture of Greece. Also states that the style of this work is simple, clear, and pure. Reviewed: Carr, Thomas Swinburne. A History of Greece. London: Longman and Co.
Finlason, William Francis.“Dr. Lingard’s History of England (Vols 7-8).” Dublin Review, 41, no. 82: (December 1856): 383–411.
        Discusses in detail the content of these volumes dedicated to the Great Rebellion of the 17th century. Publisher is Dolman. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Finlason, William Francis.“History of England; from the Fall of Wolsey to the Death of Elizabeth (Vols 1 & 2).” Dublin Review, 41, no. 82: (December 1856): 307–44.
        Examines the content and claims of Froude’s history, comparing it to the work of Lingard; states that it is often eloquent but can also be inconsistent. Publisher is J.W. Parker and Son. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Kemble, John Mitchell.“Pauli’s History of England.” Fraser’s Magazine, 54, no. 324: (December 1856): 665–80.
        Review of the German work by Reinhold Pauli; foreword by J.M. Lappenberg. Book published 1853-1855; London edition Williams & Norgate. Discusses the advantage of a foreigner writing English history, especially Pauli who has lived in England many years. Anticipates Pauli’s own translation.  (Attribution: Wellesley Index).
“The History and Antiquities of St. David’s.” Dublin Review, 41, no. 82: (December 1856): 529–30.
        States that although this book by W. B. Jones and E. H. Freeman [sic] offers nothing new, it is artistically excellent, and contains useful historical and statistical information. Publisher is Parker. The authors are William Basil Jones and Edward Augustus Freeman.
Freeman, Edward Augustus.“Trikoupes’ History of the Greek Revolution.” Saturday Review, 2, no. 58: (6 December 1856): 707–8.
        First of two notices of this work, in modern Greek, by Spyridon Trikoupis -- at that time living in London as a diplomat -- on contemporary history. The work is judged remarkable, in particular the naval accounts. The only real fault is that he does not acknowledge that the movements were not exclusively Hellenic. Published in London by Williams & Norgate. Attribution Curran Index.
Freeman, Edward Augustus.“Trikoupes’ History of the Greek Revolution.” Saturday Review, 2, no. 59: (13 December 1856): 731–32.
        (Second notice). Continues the review with comments on Spyridon Trikoupis’s scholarship in, and use of, the modern Greek language. Attribution Curran Index.
Stephen, James Fitzjames.“Mr. Gurney’s Historical Sketches.” Saturday Review, 2, no. 61: (27 December 1856): 782–83.
        Regards this second series of sketches (on St Louis and Henry IV) as powerful and lively, noting that they are intended for those young people who have outgrown Mrs. Markham and are not yet at Sismondi. But Stephen enters into debate with Gurney on the subject of political morality and the character of leaders, stating a strong justification for Empire. Attribution Curran Index.
James, Thomas.“The History and Antiquities of the County of Northampton.” Quarterly, 101, no. 201: (January 1857): 1–56.
        Discusses ten works on the county, beginning with praise for local history: ‘If we want a boy to know some day the families of the Herods and the Caesars, let him start by learning who was his own grandfather.’ Mentions the role of subscription publishing in the support of local history. Reviewed: Baker, George. The History and Antiquities of the County of Northampton. Part I-V. 1822-1841. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“Things Not Generally Known; or, Curiosities of History.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 24, no. 0: (January 1857): 63.
        Observes that the author collected information with great diligence and presented it with much skill. Reviewed: Tims, John. Things not generally Known; or, Curiosities of History. London: David Bogue.
Venables, Georg Stovin.“Lives of the Lord Chancellors of England.” Saturday Review, 3, no. 62: (3 January 1857): 14–16.
        Venables stresses the popularity of this stereotyped 4th edition of a 10-volume work by John Campbell (first Baron Campbell) first published in 1849. After Macaulay and Alison ('Mr Wordy’) Campbell’s works are ‘pre-eminently popular and saleable’ -- but all three popular historians ‘[abstain] from any demand on the thinking faculty’. Educated minds will find Campbell heavy without being instructive, as well as untrustworthy, weak, and redundant. {attribution Curran Index).
Sandars, Thomas Collett.“Mr. Thackeray on George the First.” Saturday Review, 3, no. 62: (3 January 1857): 11.
        Sandars’s anonymous comments on a public lecture recently delivered -- the first of four on the Georges, at the Marylebone Institution. The delivery was quiet, clear and amusing. Notes that these lectures were recently delivered in America. Regrets that the content was gossipy and superficial, and comments on the hypocrisy of a fashionable audience. {attribution Curran Index}.
Cecil, Robert Arthur Talbot Gascoyne (Marquis of Salisbury).“Robertson’s Church History.” Saturday Review, 3, no. 65: (24 January 1857): 83–84.
        J. C. Robertson’s book (published John Murray, 1856) is very similar to Dean Milman’s history of Latin Christianity but reads as a chronicle, or a ‘faithful narrative of events’, in contrast to Milman’s Macaulayesque ‘series of brilliant pictures’, or poetry. Good for students, or as a work of reference. (Attribution Curran Index).
Duff, Mountstuart Elphinstone Grant-.“Revolution in the Two Sicilies.” Saturday Review, 3, no. 66: (31 January 1857): 106–8.
        The reviewer of this work by Le Baron Léon D’Hervey-Saint-Denys (published Paris: Amyot, 1856) regards the author as ‘an absolutist and a fanatic’ who ‘abhors England’, but takes the opportunity to expound an alternative view of the subject. (Attribution Curran Index).
Froude, James Anthony.“Gleanings from the Record Office (Part I): The Dissolution of the Monasteries.” Fraser’s Magazine, VOLUME 55, FEBRUARY 1857: (February 1857): 127–43.
        Reflections on historical method and interpretation, followed by the archival evidence for justification of the dissolution.  (Attribution: Wellesley Index).
“French Romance in the Thirteenth Century.” Saturday Review, 3, no. 68: (14 February 1857): 160–61.
        This series of prose tales edited by L. Moland and C. D’Héricault (published Paris: Janet, 1856) is praised as a valuable contribution to the history of early European literature.
Pearson, Charles Henry.“Mary Stuart.” Saturday Review, 3, no. 69: (21 February 1857): 183–84.
        This is volume 6 of Agnes Strickland’s Queens of Scotland. Pearson is unsympathetic with Strickland’s attempt to defend Mary’s actions and character. Despite being carefully researched, the work is not historical and not critically analyzed. (Attribution Curran Index).
Russell, Charles William.“A Popular Ancient History.” Dublin Review, 42, no. 83: (March 1857): 268.
        This very brief review states that Matthew Bridges’ book is excellent, valuable, using pleasant writing and style, and exercising good judgement. Publisher is Burns and Lambert, 1856. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“A School History of the United States, from the Earliest Period to the Present Time.” Dublin Review, 42, no. 83: (March 1857): 254.
        States that this school history by John G. Shea is clear for a compendium and is just to the Catholics and not entirely unfair to the English. Publisher is Dunigan of New York.
Finlason, William Francis.“Dr. Lingard’s History of England (Vols 9 & 10, 6th Ed.” Dublin Review, 42, no. 83: (March 1857): 26–76.
        Discusses the content of these volumes, which focus on the revolution in the seventeenth century. Publisher is Dolman.
Russell, Charles William.“History of the Christian Church, from the Election of Pope Gregory the Great, to the Concordat of Worms.” Dublin Review, 42, no. 83: (March 1857): 266–68.
        Briefly examines the content and claims that James Craigie Robertson’s book is careful and minute in its research and improves upon its predecessors’ contributions, being a great advancement in church history. However the work is criticized for bias. Publisher is John Murray. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“Tales and Legends from History.” Dublin Review, 42/3, no. 83: (March 1857): 252–53.
        States that this (anonymous) work, focused mainly on tales and legends connected to the Catholic Church, is interesting and has a simple style that is to be praised; furthermore the content offers spiritual meaning. Publisher is Burns and Lambert.
“The History and Conquests of the Saracens.” Dublin Review, 42, no. 83: (March 1857): 259.
        States that E. A. Freeman’s work is useful in shedding light on an under-studied topic but that the author has some objectionable principles and is too favourable toward Mohammed. Publisher is Parker, 1856.
“The Spanish Conquest in America.” Saturday Review, 3, no. 73: (21 March 1857): 269–70.
        Another review, this time of volume 3, claims that while this is not as entertaining as the previous volumes, the work’s strength is Arthur Helps’s unique analysis of the material. A discussion on how historians take different views towards historical events is also incorporated.
“Annals of England.” Saturday Review, 3, no. 74: (28 March 1857): 296.
        This ‘epitome’ published by J. H. & J. Parker was edited by William Edward Flaherty. A ‘useful and unpretending little book’ it will be of use in school and university settings. The review comments on how parents judge ‘the historical food prepared for their children’.
Russell, Jesse Watts.“Ancient History of Sunbury.” Fraser’s Magazine, 55, no. 328: (April 1857): 471–73.
        Re-examines the ancient events at Sunbury using modern knowledge of geographical changes and looking at Caesar’s crossing of the Thames and battles between the British and the Romans.  (Attribution: Wellesley Index).
“Fields of Battle.” Saturday Review, 3, no. 77: (18 April 1857): 358–59.
        This is a collection of papers on visits to 16th-century battlefields read by the author, Richard Brooke, to the Society of Antiquaries (published London: John Russell Smith). Described as valuable, well done, and of general interest.
Cecil, Robert Arthur Talbot Gascoyne (Marquis of Salisbury).“The Life of Martin Luther.” Saturday Review, 3, no. 77: (18 April 1857): 364–65.
        The review explains that Henry Worsley does not write as a historian; the book is clearly intended to entertain and inform, and does not refer to matters of historiographical dispute. 2 vol., published London: Bell & Daldy, 1856. (Attribution Curran Index).
“The History and Antiquities of Saint David’s.” Saturday Review, 3, no. 78: (25 April 1857): 386–88.
        This book by William Basil Jones and E. A. Freeman (published J.H. Parker, 1856) seems to be intended for more advanced readers but has some appeal to the general reader. Illustrations are unsatisfactory, but the work is a valuable contribution for ecclesiologists, antiquarians, and history students.
Stephen, James Fitzjames.“Alison’s History of Europe.” Saturday Review, 3, no. 79: (2 May 1857): 408–9.
        Review of volume 6 of Archibald Alison’s History of Europe 1815-1852. Scathing as usual: ‘Envelopment in the dense Scotch mist -- moral, intellectual, and sometimes even grammatical -- in which the landscape is shrouded, is the price which [readers] must pay for the convenience’. (Attribution Curran Index).
“Collections Illustrating the History of the Catholic Religion in the Counties of Cornwall, Devon, Dorset, Somerset, Wilts, and Gloucester.” Dublin Review, 42, no. 84: (June 1857): 527–28.
        Claims that this work needs no recommendation as it upholds the Rev George Oliver’s good reputation; offers a brief discussion of the subject matter and states that it is well-researched. Publisher is Dolman.
Froude, James Anthony.“Gleanings from the Record Office (Part II): Henry the Eighth and Mary Boleyn, 1830-1882.” Fraser’s Magazine, VOLUME 55, JUNE 1857: (June 1857): 724–38.
        Part 2 of article begun in February 1857 issue.  (Attribution: Wellesley Index).
Russell, Charles William.“The History of Normandy and of England (Vol 2).” Dublin Review, 42, no. 84: (June 1857): 528.
        Claims that this work is full of Sir Francis Palgrave’s usual characteristics, being well-researched, quaint, eccentric, and beautiful. Publisher is Parker and Son. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Jeffrey, Francis.“The Spanish Conquest in America, and Its Relations to the History of Slavery and the Government of Colonies.” Dublin Review, 42, no. 84: (June 1857): 294–317.
        Offers a detailed discussion of the content with lengthy excerpts and claims that Arthur Helps’s book, which is designed to aid those in search of answers to questions about slavery, is impartial, uses well-translated sources, and is truthful. However the reviewer notes that the style is not in historical order and therefore cannot be compared to other’s works on the topic. Publisher is Parker and Son. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“Lewes’s Biographical History of Philosophy.” Saturday Review, 3, no. 85: (13 June 1857): 552–53.
        This is an enlarged and improved edition of George Henry Lewes’s book first published in 1846. Described as original, thoughtful, remarkable, and a valuable work which plainly and strongly states opinions. Published by J. W. Parker, 1857.
“The Egyptians in the Time of the Pharaohs.” Saturday Review, 3, no. 85: (13 June 1857): 555–56.
        States that this work by Sir Gardner Wilkinson (a Companion to the Crystal Palace Egyptian collections, published by Bradbury & Evans for the Crystal Palace Company, 1857) is amusing and instructive. Published for the circulating-library and railway-bookstall market, it popularizes the Egyptian antiquities and has numerous and well executed illustrations.
“Lives of the Earl and Countess of Arundel.” Saturday Review, 3, no. 87: (27 June 1857): 603–4.
        The Duke of Norfolk has set a good example by editing a manuscript in the possession of his family. Despite inevitable bias of family prejudice, the value of this sort of document lies in how it completes the picture of a person or era of historical significance.
Kennedy, John Pitt.“History of the Irish Poor-Law in Connexion with the Condition of the People.” Quarterly, 102, no. 203: (July 1857): 59–88.
        Describes the book as a ‘very important work’ while addressing the subject independently. Reviewed: Nicholls, Sir George. History of the Irish Poor-Law in connexion with the condition of the People. 1856. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Jephson, John Mounteney.“Palgrave’s History of Normandy and of England, Vol 2.” Fraser’s Magazine, 56, no. 331: (July 1857): 16–31.
        Mixed review of Francis Palgrave’s second volume (published 1857 by J. W. Parker). Jephson notes that ‘of all the various modes of wasting time, to write or read short and comprehensive histories is the most unprofitable’ -- but this does not refer to Palgrave’s work {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Sandars, Thomas Collett.“Buckle’s History of Civilization in England. Vol. 1.” Saturday Review, 4, no. 89: (11 July 1857): 38–40.
        Thomas Henry Buckle’s book is remarkable, rich, and ‘has created a new standard of philosophical history’ by introducing a scientific approach. Published by J. W. Parker. (Attribution Curran Index).
“History of Greek Literature.” Saturday Review, 4, no. 91: (25 July 1857): 84–86.
        The fifth volume of W. Mure’s book is pleasing and deserving of attention.
“History of Greek Literature.” Saturday Review, 4, no. 93: (8 August 1857): 134–35.
        Hopes that someone whose style is more pithy and whose aim is less ambitious than Mure’s may offer a short but scholarly work on the same topic.
“The Empire and the Church.” Saturday Review, 4, no. 94: (15 August 1857): 162–63.
        Reviewer claims that the diction and style of the book by Mrs Hamilton Grey is clear and sensible; it achieves its goal in appealing to the general public. States the book is a ‘manual for reference and pretends to be nothing more.’
“Barante’s Etudes Historiques.” Saturday Review, 4, no. 95: (22 August 1857): 185–86.
        One of the most eminent and learned historians.
“History of German Literature.” Saturday Review, 4, no. 96: (29 August 1857): 208–9.
        Book by Julian von Schmidt (in German) is useful to both the beginner and the veteran student of German literature.
“A Critical History of the Language and Literature of Ancient Greece (Vol 5).” Dublin Review, 43, no. 85: (September 1857): 258–59.
        Briefly discusses the content of this and previous volumes of William Mure’s work and states that it is interesting, complete, and agreeable. Publisher is Longman.
“A History of the Church in England, from the Earliest Period to the Reestablishment of the Hierarchy in 1850.” Dublin Review, 43, no. 85: (September 1857): 262–65.
        The reviewer criticizes the Rev Canon Flanagan for writing more of an outline than a history, by summarizing topics rather than discussing them at length, but still finds the work very valuable as a source for religious history. Publisher is Dolman.
Russell, Charles William.“Five Years in Damascus, Including an Account of the History, Topography, and Antiquities of That City. With Travels and Researches in Palmyra, Lebanon, and the Hauran.” Dublin Review, 43, no. 85: (September 1857): 266–67.
        States that this work is interesting and that the Rev J. L. Porter is well informed about his topics. Publisher is John Murray, 1855. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Finlason, William Francis.“History of England: From the Peace of Utrecht to the Peace of Versailles (1713-1783).” Dublin Review, 43, no. 85: (September 1857): 1–50.
        Review in depth of various works on English history (Mahon, Macaulay, Creasy, etc). {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“The History of the Romans under the Empire (Vols 4 & 5).” Dublin Review, 43, no. 85: (September 1857): 260–61.
        Discusses the content of Charles Merivale’s book, and states that it is excellent, interesting, and offers a lively picture of important times. Publisher is Longman, 1856.
Stokes, Whitley.“Adamnan’s Life of Saint Columba.” Saturday Review, 4, no. 97: (5 September 1857): 224–25.
        Is a remarkable work that deserves more attention than it has received. (Attribution Curran Index).
“Elizabeth De Valois.” Saturday Review, 4, no. 98: (12 September 1857): 245–46.
        Agreeably written, does not detract from Martha Walker Freer’s well-earned reputation. Publisher is Hurst & Blackett.
“Lectures on Roman Husbandry.” Saturday Review, 4, no. 98: (12 September 1857): 247–48.
        Clear and spirited sketch by Charles Daubeny; published by J. H. Parker.
“THE HISTORY OF THE FOUR KINGS.” Chambers’s, 0, no. 193: (12 September 1857): 171–73.
        The history of playing cards from their origin in 12th century China. Evolution of the cards themselves and the games that they were used to play in various countries and in various cultures.
“Tucker’s United States.” Saturday Review, 4, no. 98: (12 September 1857): 248–49.
        Discusses what U.S history should be and expands on George Tucker’s defects.
“The Franks.” Saturday Review, 4, no. 99: (19 September 1857): 268–69.
        Differs from predecessors in general treatment and conclusions drawn; review states that this book by W. S. Perry is the authority on the subject.
“Henri IV et Richelieu.” Saturday Review, 4, no. 100: (26 September 1857): 288–89.
        Michelet’s work is characterized as a vivid narration, which reflects positivist philosophy; it is eloquently and well-written.
“History of the English and American Press.” Saturday Review, 4, no. 100: (26 September 1857): 283–84.
        Cucheval Clarigny’s book is readable, written with industry , and contains a great amount of information of more or less interest. In French.
“Lappenberg’s England Under the Anglo-Norman Kings.” Saturday Review, 4, no. 100: (26 September 1857): 286.
        Reviewer praises Johann Martin Lappenburg for his accuracy in his research; claims he has produced ‘incomparably the best modern narrative of the period with which he deals.’
Vaughan, Robert Alfred.“Art and History.” Fraser’s Magazine, 56, no. 334: (October 1857): 498–504.
        Examines the interconnection of art and history and how they affect each other. Uses specific examples of historical events that had an impact on art and vice versa {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Ford, Richard.“The Book of Rugby School, Its History, and Its Daily Life.” Quarterly, 102, no. 204: (October 1857): 330–54.
        The author of The Book of Rugby School (Edward Meyrick Goulburn, Arnold’s successor as headmaster) is mentioned in the text. After a lengthy discourse on the school, the reviewer (Ford) turns to the novel: ‘This attractive and suggestive book is singularly free from all sickly sentimentalism.’ Reviewed: The Book of Rugby School, its History, and its Daily Life. 1856; also Tom Brown’s School Days, 1857. No author’s name given. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“Gieseler’s Church History.” Saturday Review, 4, no. 103: (17 October 1857): 355–56.
        Accurate, clear, comprehensive, and a welcome church history for all students.
“History of St. Canice Cathedral.” Saturday Review, 4, no. 103: (17 October 1857): 353–54.
        Book by the Rev. James Graves contributes to scientific archaeology of Ireland and piques interest in the topic.
“Moral Culture of Antiquity.” Saturday Review, 4, no. 103: (17 October 1857): 352–53.
        This book by J. Denis, published in Paris in French, is judged to be a valuable contribution to the study of the institutions and evidence of Christianity.
“Brialmont’s History of the Duke of Wellington.” Saturday Review, 4, no. 104: (24 October 1857): 372.
        This work in the French language by A. Brialmont does honour to England and equal honour to France.
“Murray’s British India.” Saturday Review, 4, no. 105: (31 October 1857): 397–98.
        Not profound and original but rather Hugh Murray has made a mere compendium of ordinary and familiar books.
“The History of the Factory Movement, by Alfred.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 0, no. 0: (November 1857): 699–701.
        States that this work has brought into question important facts about labour and capital and warrants the author coming out of anonymity. Reviewed: [Samuel Kidd]. The History of the Factory Movement. London: Simpkin, Marshall, and Co.
“Historical Parallels to the Indian Mutiny.” Saturday Review, 4, no. 106: (7 November 1857): 416–17.
        This article compares historical Carthaginian struggles (Mithridatic War) to the Indian crisis currently occurring.
“A Hundred Years Ago.” Saturday Review, 4, no. 107: (14 November 1857): 448–49.
        James Hutton’s book adds nothing new to the topic.
Muller, Friedrich Max.“Renan’s Essays on the History of Religion.” Saturday Review, 4, no. 109: (28 November 1857): 496.
        Discusses new additions to the new edition.
“The History, Architecture, and Antiquities of the Cathedral Church of St. Canice, Kilkenny.” Dublin Review, 43, no. 86: (December 1857): 526.
        States that this work is valuable, well-researched, and does not overlook any relevant topic. Adds that it is an excellent addition to local Irish history. Authors are the Rev James Graves and John Augustus Pin. Publisher is Hodges, Smith and Co. of Dublin.
“Untitled.” Boy’s Own Magazine, 4, no. 8: (8 January 1858): 228.
        The untitled account chronicles an English ship’s arrival in Patagonia to find what they believed was a satyr. After hunting and capturing it, they realized it was a Scottish man, deserted in Chile for five years.
“BEETON’S HISTORIAN.” Boy’s Own Magazine, 4, no. 9: (9 January 1858)
        Announcement that Motley’s great historical work, the Rise of the Dutch Republic is ready for sale.
“Life of Mary Queen of Scots.” Saturday Review, 5, no. 118: (30 January 1858): 115–16.
        States that this biography by Donald MacLeod (published in New York) is too biased and that the author has a disregard for historical facts and evidence.
Stebbing, William.“History of England, from the Peace of Utrecht to the Peace of Versailles, 1713-1783.” North British, 28, no. 55: (February 1858): [3]-33.
        This review of the fifth edition of Philip Henry Stanhope’s ‘able’ work discusses the content of a book dedicated to the political and religious history of England between 1713 and 1783. Publisher is John Murray.
“Hazlitt’s Republic of Venice.” Saturday Review, 5, no. 120: (13 February 1858): 164–65.
        Reviewer claims Hazlitt has ‘no power of composition, no power of historical criticism and no knowledge of general European history.’
Freeman, Edward Augustus.“Trikoupes’ History of the Greek Revolution.” Saturday Review, 5, no. 121: (20 February 1858): 192–93.
        Review of final (third?) volume of Spyridon Trikoupis’s history. (See also two notices in 1856). Praises a well-written narrative on Greece’s ‘noble struggle for freedom.’ (Attribution Curran Index).
“God’s Heroes and the World’s Heroes.” Saturday Review, 5, no. 122: (27 February 1858): 219–20.
        Criticizes the author, J. Hampton Gurney, and the whole school of historical thought to which he belongs, which praise the history of missionaries over other historical figures.
“History of the Life and Times of Edward Burke.” Dublin Review, 44, no. 87: (March 1858): 260–61.
        States that Thomas Macknight’s book brings worthy attention to Burke’s memory, but criticizes the style as showy and long winded.
Jeffrey, Francis.“The History and Life of the Rev. Dr. John Tauler, of Strasbourg, with Twenty-Five of His Sermons.” Dublin Review, 44, no. 87: (March 1858): 31–99.
        Under the general title ‘The German Mystics of the Fourteenth Century’, the reviewer examines the content of various books dedicated to Catholicism and the Reformation in Germany, concentrating on Tauler’s work. Author attribution Wellesley Index.
Forbes, James David.“The History of Science; and Some of Its Lessons.” Fraser’s Magazine, 57, no. 339: (March 1858): 283–94.
        Author is William Whewell; title is History of the Inductive Sciences from the Earliest to the Present Time (3rd ed., 3 volumes, published 1857 by J. W. Parker).  (Attribution: Wellesley Index).
“The Campaign of 1815.” Saturday Review, 5, no. 123: (6 March 1858): 248–51.
        Well-researched, well-written and intriguing account of this event. Written in French by Lieut. Colonel Charras; published in London by Jeffs.
“The Geraldines.” Saturday Review, 5, no. 124: (13 March 1858): 273–74.
        A study of the earls of Kildare, by the current Marquis of Kildare. Commends the author for choosing a good subject and combining a detailed history of a family within a wider historical context.
Sandars, Thomas Collett.“Froude’s History of England. Vols 3 & 4.” Saturday Review, 5, no. 125: (20 March 1858): 294–95.
        This review covers Volume 3 only. Admires J. A. Froude’s researches into newly-discovered manuscript materials but raises questions about reliability with respect to his interpretation of this evidence. Attribution Curran Index.
Cecil, Robert Arthur Talbot Gascoyne (Marquis of Salisbury).“The Factory Movement.” Saturday Review, 5, no. 125: (20 March 1858): 298–99.
        Partisan, wordy, panegyric account of conflict between classes. The book is written under a pseudonym ('Alfred’) and published by Simpkin & Marshall. (Attribution Curran Index).
Stephen, James Fitzjames.“Alison’s History of Europe (1815-52).” Saturday Review, 5, no. 126: (27 March 1858): 317–19.
        This scathing review of volume 7 of Archibald Alison’s (very popular) work discusses the perils of writing contemporary history. It may be distasteful to “acute and practiced intellects.” (Attribution Curran Index).
Sandars, Thomas Collett.“Froude’s History of England. Vols 3 & 4.” Saturday Review, 5, no. 126: (27 March 1858): 320–21.
        Continues from the previous week. James A. Froude can tell a dull story well and makes the old story seem new by finding and using new and copious material. But dissents from several conclusions, especially with respect to Henry VIII. Attribution Curran Index.
“Recovery of Greek Classics.” Saturday Review, 5, no. 126: (27 March 1858): 313–14.
        Article about recovering classical Greek texts from people who own them so they can be rightfully placed in a library.
“History of Italian Literature, Rev. Ed.” Fraser’s Magazine, 57, no. 340: (April 1858): 426–39.
        Revised and enlarged edition of a work by Paolo Giudici. Review is signed ARB, not identified by Wellesley.
Arthur, William.“The History of Christianity in India from the Commencement of the Christian Era.” London Review, 10, no. 19: (April 1858): [n. pag.].
        Review of several works, beginning with that of Rev. James Hough. The reviewer states that the earliest origins of Christianity in India cannot be known, but provides a history since Alfred the Great’s mission in the 9th century. The reviewer also explains that the attempts of the Portuguese to disseminate Christianity in India led to conflict. The middle part of this article is dedicated to missionary attempts to Christianize India in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. The end is devoted to the current status of Christian beliefs and education and some predictions for its course in the future.
Freeman, Edward Augustus.“Materials for British History.” Saturday Review, 5, no. 127: (3 April 1858): 350–51.
        Reviews a medieval Chronicle of England published in the Rolls Series, observing that the low cost of this book will make it widely read and the language is suitable for ordinary readers. (Attribution Curran Index).
“The Queens of Prussia.” Saturday Review, 5, no. 128: (10 April 1858): 374–75.
        Reviewer criticizes the book for its lack of research, but finds merit in the narrative. The review suggests that since the style is clear and easy it will be popular with the public. Author is Emma Willsherer Atkinson; publisher is Kent & Co.
“Floto’s History of the Emperor Henry IV.” Saturday Review, 5, no. 129: (17 April 1858): 398–99.
        Review says the work adds nothing new but Von Hartwig Floto does contest Protestant writers of the past who sympathized with Hildebrandine Romanism. Book is in German, published Stuttgart.
“History of Ancient Pottery.” Saturday Review, 5, no. 129: (17 April 1858): 396–98.
        First of two notices of Samuel Birch’s work. What might seem a useless subject is shown to be useful in demonstrating “fictile art” of Egypt, Assyria, Greece, and Rome, and the Celtic, and Teutonic nations.
“History of Ancient Pottery.” Saturday Review, 5, no. 130: (24 April 1858): 425–26.
        (Second Notice). Illustrations are carefully and delicately designed, although descriptions of engravings are lacking.
O’Connell, James.“An Inquiry into the Credibility of Early Roman, History.” North British, 28, no. 54: (May 1858): [287]-312.
        Discusses the methods and theories involved in the study of Roman history. Lengthy discussion of the influence and benefits Niebuhr’s methods compared to those of others, followed by the methods and content of this book by G. Cornwall Lewis. Attribution Wellesley Index.
“The Antiquities of the New World.” Saturday Review, 5, no. 131: (1 May 1858): 445–46.
        Summarizes information that is new to ordinary readers which thus should have been expanded on. Review covers three works: on Mexican History/Archaeology by B. Mayer; on US Archaeology by Samuel F. Haven, and Peruvian Antiquities by Mariano Edward Rovero et al.
“History of the Canon of the New Testament.” Saturday Review, 5, no. 133: (15 May 1858): 510–11.
        Theology students and general public owe a debt to Westcott for candid and comprehensive essay on this topic.
“History of the Romans under the Empire, Vol 6.” Dublin Review, 44, no. 88: (June 1858): 526–28.
        States that Charles Merivale’s work overrates the value and influence of heathen morality and contains theories that are unwarranted and unfounded which the reviewer hope the author will reconsider. However, states that this work is an interesting, useful, and well-told story. Publisher is Longman, 1858.
Finlason, William Francis.“The History of England from the Fall of Wolsey to the Death of Elizabeth (Vols 3 & 4).” Dublin Review, 44, no. 88: (June 1858): 445–85.
        Discusses the content of the work in depth, but regards several claims or sources as bringing Froude’s merit as a historian into question. Publisher is Parker and Son. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Freeman, Edward Augustus.“Lives of Edward the Confessor.” Saturday Review, 5, no. 136: (5 June 1858): 590–91.
        All three works reviewed offer a valuable contribution to the history of early England. Authors are Charles Didier, Mme la Princesse de Belgie; Henry Richards Laird.
“Forster’s Essays.” Saturday Review, 5, no. 137: (12 June 1858): 616–17.
        These two volumes are not connected at all in subject matter. The first volume is a valuable contribution to history and the second is a valuable contribution to biography, but they do not come together as a homogeneous whole.
“Richelieu.” Saturday Review, 5, no. 137: (12 June 1858): 614–16.
        Michelet’s book, Richelieu et le Fronde (published D. Nutt), is a ‘Good specimen of the mixed influences which affect modern history.’
Smiles, Samuel.“A Comprehensive History of the Iron Trade.” Quarterly, 104, no. 207: (July 1858): 75–106.
        Seven works are reviewed, in a celebration of Britain’s contributions to the industry. Reviewed: Scrivenor, Harry. A Comprehensive History of the Iron Trade. 1841. attribution Wellesley Index}.
Donne, William Bodham.“Froude’s History of England, Vols 3 & 4.” Fraser’s Magazine, 58, no. 343: (July 1858): 15–32.
        Donne admires James Anthony Froude’s ‘manly graces of . . . language’ as well as his research and literary skill, and is relieved to see Henry VIII’s actions exonerated. Publisher is Parker & Son, 1858.  (Attribution: Wellesley Index).
Pollock, W. Frederick.“History of Civilization in England.” Quarterly, 104, no. 207: (July 1858): 38–74.
        The reviewer, Pollock, is a Tory politician and mathematician. He debunks Buckle’s manifesto for conceptualizing history as a science, governed by laws. Reviewed: Buckle, Henry Thomas. History of Civilization in England. vol. I. 1857. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“Merivale’s Rome Under the Emperors. Vol. 6.” Saturday Review, 6, no. 142: (17 July 1858): 63–64.
        Discusses the successors of the Julian Caesars and notes that Charles Merivale upholds his reputation as a learned, faithful and picturesque chronicler.
“A Tale of Roman Life.” Saturday Review, 6, no. 143: (24 July 1858): 81–82.
        Document recently appearing in the Revue des Deux Mondes was from the time of Gregory XVI and offers facts about Roman life.
Froude, James Anthony.“The Commonplace Book of Richard Hilles.” Fraser’s Magazine, VOLUME 58, AUGUST 1858: (August 1858): 127–44.
        Selections from a 16th-century manuscript held in the Bodleian. Froude calls for the preparation of a modern edition (which seems never to have been published).  (Attribution: Wellesley Index).
“Tudors and Stuarts.” Saturday Review, 6, no. 146: (14 August 1858): 165–66.
        Is partisan and not the work of a sound patriot. Discusses several passages which are described as an abomination. Author is identified only as ‘a descendent of the Plantagenets’; publisher is Hardwicke.
“Narcissus Luttrell’s Diary.” Saturday Review, 6, no. 147: (21 August 1858): 192–93.
        Judges the work to be ’musty and tedious’ ; readers would be insane to wade through it.
“William the Conqueror.” Saturday Review, 6, no. 147: (21 August 1858): 188–89.
        Useful to history students but not good for Napier’s reputation. Subtitled ‘A Historical Romance’ the book is by Charles Napier; publisher is Routledge.
“The Annals of Windsor.” Saturday Review, 6, no. 148: (28 August 1858): 209–10.
        Historically valuable, vast amount of information, and of general and literary interest. Authors are R. R. Tighe and J. E. Davis; publisher is Longman.
“The City of the Great King.” Saturday Review, 6, no. 148: (28 August 1858): 211–13.
        The author, J. T. Barclay, is incapable of drawing sound conclusions but does uncover a couple of important facts about Jerusalem, particularly within the Harem. Publisher is Trubner.
Froude, James Anthony.“The ‘Edinburgh Review’ and Mr. Froude’s History.” Fraser’s Magazine, 58, no. 345: (September 1858): 359–78.
        Froude responds to criticism of an Edinburgh reviewer (identified by Wellesley Index as Goldwin Smith) about his work on Henry VIII. He evaluates specific facts and portions of the work that were harshly attacked and explains them further in an attempt to counter the reviewer’s comments.  (Attribution: Wellesley Index).
“The History of Herodotus.” Dublin Review, 45, no. 89: (September 1858): 259–63.
        Examines the content of volumes 1 and 2 of G. Rawlinson’s translation and states that it is fluent and readable; the work itself is clear and truthful. Promises a complete review when all volumes have been published. Publisher is John Murray.
“Historical Romance.” Saturday Review, 6, no. 150: (11 September 1858): 251–52.
        This article observes that historical romances present facts and connect them together without knowing the true sequence of events. Whereas a true historian, like Froude, will present the facts and let the reader piece the sequence together.
Freeman, Edward Augustus.“Chronicles and Memorials of Great Britain and Ireland.” Saturday Review, 6, no. 151: (18 September 1858): 283–85.
        This third notice of two collections of medieval documents judges both to be well edited. Editors are W. W. Shirley and Rev. Charles Hardwick. (Attribution Curran Index).
“Homer and the Homeric Age.” Saturday Review, 6, no. 152: (25 September 1858): 307–9.
        Remarkable; the most interesting part is where William Ewart Gladstone focuses on Homer’s poetical excellence.
“Marie Antoinette.” Saturday Review, 6, no. 152: (25 September 1858): 305–6.
        The authors, Edmond and Jules de Goncourt, ‘are not without a certain aptitude for bookmaking, but their minds display a feminine character.’ The review nevertheless anticipates the book will be popular because it’s about an attractive subject. Includes comments on Strickland’s works on the lives of queens.
“A History of the Romans under the Empire.” London Review, 11, no. 21: (October 1858): 172–91.
        Review of Volume 6 of Charles Merivale’s history, including the reigns of Nero, Galba, Otho, Vitellius and Vespasian to the destruction of Jerusalem. The reviewer appreciates his attention to Roman Britain, though they say it is still impossible to really understand the history since the only sources are the Romans. The reviewer believes Merivale has adequately responded to the question of why the empire did not break apart during Nero’s reign and accepts his warning not to confuse ancient and modern despotism.
“Massey’s History of England.” Saturday Review, 6, no. 154: (9 October 1858): 352–53.
        This review covers volume 2 of the work by William Massey (published Parker). Style of writing is not eloquent but practical and clear. ‘If his history is not a perfect one, it is the best of the period.’
“Memoirs of Count Miot De Melito.” Saturday Review, 6, no. 154: (9 October 1858): 354–55.
        Calm, sensible, painstaking, observant, and a valuable addition to the literature of the Consulate and the Empire, but uses peculiar sources. Publisher is Michel Levy Freres, of Paris.
“Monastic Historians in English.” Saturday Review, 6, no. 154: (9 October 1858): 355–57.
        This study, entitled The Church Historians of England (vol 4 part 1) is a translation of the medieval church historians, by Rev Joseph Stevenson; reviewer states that translation is poor, and it would have been more useful to make additions to the original version than to have translated it. Publisher is Seeley, 1856.
“Studies of the Great Rebellion.” Saturday Review, 6, no. 155: (16 October 1858): 377–78.
        Presents a marked contrast to other recent volumes on the Stuarts which are unwholesome; believes this work by John Langton Sanford will be better received. Publisher is Parker.
“The Antiquities of Lambeth.” Saturday Review, 6, no. 155: (16 October 1858): 380–82.
        John Tanswell’s book would have been better had it been better arranged and if it had an index (which is to be hoped for in the next edition). Publisher is John Russell Smith.
“The Encyclopaedia Metropolitana - Church History.” Saturday Review, 6, no. 155: (16 October 1858): 378–80.
        Objects to the plan of the book (by Rev Alfred Lyell et al) but not the general execution, as the execution is deserving of praise. Publisher is Griffin.
“Beatrice Cenci.” Saturday Review, 6, no. 156: (23 October 1858): 401–2.
        An Historical Novel of the Sixteenth Century. By F D. Guerrazzi., who says it will not be read by good girls but by ‘maidens of my native land.’ Reviewer concludes that Shelley’s version is more trustworthy.
“Carlyle’s History of Frederick II.” Saturday Review, 6, no. 156: (23 October 1858): 398–99.
        This work is not for those who cannot understand Carlyle’s ‘peculiar language’ and is also careless with abstractions and generalizations.
Cecil, Robert Arthur Talbot Gascoyne (Marquis of Salisbury).“The Reformers of Italy and France.” Saturday Review, 6, no. 156: (23 October 1858): 402–3.
        This book by J. C. Colquhoun is described as agreeable, instructive, and points out ecclesiastical history that is often neglected. Publisher is Werthen and Macintosh. (Attribution Curran Index).
“Barnes on Ancient Britain.” Saturday Review, 6, no. 157: (30 October 1858): 429–30.
        Is slighter in size and texture than the actual subject, though William Barnes knows the subject well and the reader can obtain useful “hints while turning over this little volume.” Publisher is J. R. Smith.
“Carlyle’s History of Frederick II.” Saturday Review, 6, no. 157: (30 October 1858): 423–25.
        There is little about actual life of Friedrich as it focuses primarily on his reign.
“Southey’s Life of Wesley.” Saturday Review, 6, no. 157: (30 October 1858): 425–26.
        Great and of peculiar charm.
“A Compendium of Universal History.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 0, no. 0: (November 1858): 694.
        States that this work is useful , both to youths and to those who have long left school, with its question and answer form; it addresses very general facts about history. Reviewed: A Compendium of Universal History. London: Jarrold and Sons.
“History of Civilization in England.” North British, 29, no. 58: (November 1858): 556–58.
        States that Buckle’s work does not warrant a full review due to its questionable merit, then briefly adds that it demonstrates the author’s lack of knowledge on various subjects and omits valuable subject matter. Also his writing is slovenly and egotistical and overall he is not a profound thinker. Publisher is Parker and Son.
Venables, Georg Stovin.“Carlyle’s History of Frederick II.” Saturday Review, 6, no. 158: (6 November 1858): 450–51.
        [3rd notice]. Every reader will be left thinking that Frederick William was not the most unforgivable of human nature. (Attribution Curran Index).
“HISTORY OF GREEK LITERATURE.” Saturday Review, 6, no. 158: (6 November 1858): 455–56.
        Offers a full, yet concise, learned yet entertaining, account of the topic. Author is K. O. Mueller; publisher is J.W. Parker.
“Autobiography of Catherine of Russia.” Saturday Review, 6, no. 161: (27 November 1858): 535–36.
        Preface (by A. Herzen) is more political than historical. Publisher is Trubner.
“Carlyle’s History of Frederick the Great.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 0, no. 0: (December 1858): 743–48.
        States that the first two volumes merely discuss the parents and ancestors of Frederick the Great, providing too much detailed information. Reviewed: Carlyle, T. . History of Frederick the Great. London: Chapman and Hall. vol. I & II.
“The History and Mystery of Common Things.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 0, no. 0: (December 1858): 756.
        States that this work is in question-and-answer form, providing information about various commodities such as what people eat, drink, wear. Reviewed: The History and Mystery of Common Things. Hamilton, Adams, and Co.
Crolly, George.“The History of the So-Called Jansenist Church of Holland, with a Sketch of Its Earlier Annals.” Dublin Review, 45, no. 90: (December 1858): 428–84.
        Discusses the content of the Rev. J. M. Neale’s book in great detail and states that this work is glorious and recommended. Publisher is Parker. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“Bacon’s Historical Works.” Saturday Review, 6, no. 163: (11 December 1858): 588–89.
        Discusses Bacon’s style and skills as an historian.
“Biography of Lord George Bentinck.” Saturday Review, 6, no. 165: (25 December 1858): 646–47.
        Disraeli’s biography is described as careless; makes outlandish claims.
“Carlyle’s History of Frederick the Great.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 26, no. 0: (January 1859): 41–45.
        Reviewer mainly offers a summary of the content of these volumes, with lengthy excerpts; also states that this work disappoints as it does not offer what is promised and has too many peculiarities of style.  Reviewed: Carlyle, T. History of Frederick the Great. London: Chapman and Hall.
“THE LIFE OF JAMES WATT.” Saturday Review, 7, no. 167: (8 January 1859): 47–48.
        Well-researched, but not a good narrative. Author is James Patrick Muirhead; publisher is Murray.
“M. LOUIS BLANC’S FRENCH REVOLUTION.” Saturday Review, 7, no. 168: (15 January 1859): 72–73.
        English readers must excuse Blanc’s theatrical sympathies with the French; as the reviewer observes, he does not write for them..
“CARLYLE’S HISTORY OF FREDERICK THE GREAT.” Chambers’s, 0, no. 264: (22 January 1859): 51–55.
        First part of a review (concluded in the 29 January 1859 issue) of Thomas Carlyle’s life of Fredrick II of Prussia (1712-1786), focusing on the large section which examines the ‘hero’s’ childhood and the life of his father, Fredrick Wilhelm (1688-1740).
“THE DESCENDANTS OF THE STUARTS.” Saturday Review, 7, no. 169: (22 January 1859): 102–3.
        May have been more interesting had it been more carefully constructed. Author is William Townend; publisher is Longman.
“MASSON’S LIFE OF MILTON.” Saturday Review, 7, no. 170: (29 January 1859): 128–30.
        David Masson has collected new information and made use of all available sources. The work has a merit that counter-balances all the defects.
Stephen, James Fitzjames.“THE HISTORY OF BRITISH JOURNALISM.” Saturday Review, 7, no. 170: (29 January 1859): 127–28.
        Good collection of materials but style at times is vulgar. Author is Alexander Andrews; publisher is Bentley. (Attribution Curran Index).
“French History.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 0, no. 0: (February 1859): 94–98.
        Offers a summary of the content of this work with excerpts and states that it is interesting and told as a story which makes the reader forget they are even learning history. Reviewed: Miss [Julia] Pardoe. Episodes of French History. London: Hurst and Blackett.
Kelton (Mrs).“History of Frederick II of Prussia, Called Frederick the Great.” North British, 30, no. 59: (February 1859): 22–43.
        States that Thomas Carlyle’s biography is well-written; opinions within it are well thought out, honest and independent, and Carlyle answers his proposed questions well with good analysis. Adds that not only is Carlyle a great historian, he is also a poet. Publisher is Chapman and Hall, 1858. Attribution Wellesley Index.
“THE LAST JOURNALS OF HORACE WALPOLE.” Saturday Review, 7, no. 173: (19 February 1859): 216–17.
        Would be useful to a new biographer, as the primary document needed in writing about Walpole.
Russell, Charles William.“History of Frederick II. of Prussia, Called Frederick the Great.” Dublin Review, 46, no. 91: (March 1859): 264–65.
        Brief notice of volumes 1 and 2, promising extensive review in following issue. Publisher is Chapman and Hall. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Peacock, Thomas Love.“Mueller and Donaldson’s History of Greek Literature.” Fraser’s Magazine, 59, no. 351: (March 1859): 357–77.
        A balanced review of this three-volume work initiated by J. M. Donaldson in 1858 and continued by K. O. Mueller after his death; published J. W. Parker 1858.  (Attribution: Wellesley Index).
“The History and Antiquities of the Anglo-Saxon Church.” Dublin Review, 46, no. 91: (March 1859): 263.
        States that this reprint of Lingard’s older book is of good physical quality and is affordable and commendable. Publisher is the Catholic Publishing Company, 1858.
Russell, Charles William.“The History of Herodotus (Vol 4).” Dublin Review, 46, no. 91: (March 1859): 259–60.
        Examines the content of this volume of G. Rawlinson’s translation; states that the maps, illustrations and notes are very useful. Publisher is John Murray, 1858. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“Memoirs of the Court of George IV.” Saturday Review, 7, no. 176: (12 March 1859): 308–10.
        Overall the memoirs make a good political history; however the Duke of Buckingham and Chandos, as editor, could have given more consideration to the wider historical context of the period. Publisher is Hurst & Blackett.
“LATHBURY’S HISTORY OF THE PRAYER BOOK.” Saturday Review, 7, no. 178: (26 March 1859): 377.
        Diligent collection of source material but not so skillful in judgment of using them. The book is too late, as the topic is not of general interest any longer.
Rigg, James Harrison.“History of Civilization in England.” London Review, 12, no. 23: (April 1859): [4]-57.
        This 54-page review begins by praising the first volume of Henry Thomas Buckle’s history for ‘faithfully describing the conditions under which English society was formed’. The reviewers claim that although many facts were already known, the ‘whole connections have never been brought out so ably.’ Buckle’s decision to write a history of England rather than the world is viewed as a success by the reviewers, although both seem arbitrary in their dismissal of America, Germany, and France as possible subjects. The length of the review considers the many weaknesses the reviewers found in his chapters due to his ‘intellectualism, fatalism, and presentism.’ Publisher is J. W. Parker. (Attribution: Wellesley Index).
Pollock, W. Frederick.“History of Friedrich II. of Prussia, Called Frederick the Great.” Quarterly, 105, no. 210: (April 1859): 275–304.
        Addresses the second edition, commenting on the interest inspired by the subject, but noting that ‘future portions of the biography’ have yet to appear. Judges this to be Carlyle’s ‘worst work’, on grounds of the author’s notorious style. Compares Carlyle to the Pre-Raphaelites. Attribution Wellesley Index.
“The Descendants of the Stuarts. An Unchronicled Page in England’s History.” London Review, 10, no. 19: (April 1859): 282–83.
        Brief review of a book by William Townend (published Longman), which celebrates the Jacobite succession.
Stephen, James Fitzjames.“PLUTARCH’S LIVES.” Saturday Review, 7, no. 179: (2 April 1859): 402–4.
        Discusses reputation of the work and the influence of Plutarch. Translator of this edition is R. Langborne. (Attribution Curran Index).
“LORD MACAULAY’S LIFE OF PITT.” Saturday Review, 7, no. 180: (9 April 1859): 434–35.
        Reviews Macaulay’s essay on Pitt in Encyclopedia Britannica (8th ed). Regards it as interesting and instructive.
“BURGON’S LIFE OF TYTLER.” Saturday Review, 7, no. 181: (16 April 1859): 468–70.
        Pleasing, but this account of the life of Patrick Fraser Tytler (by John W. Burgon) could have been more concise; the sources used were helpful. Publisher is Murray.
“THIERRY’S HISTORY OF THE TIERS ETAT.” Saturday Review, 7, no. 181: (16 April 1859): 472–73.
        Draws attention to important matters (Roman municipal spirit in France).
“A NEW HISTORY OF THE CONQUEST OF MEXICO.” Saturday Review, 7, no. 182: (23 April 1859): 500–501.
        Before English readers could stand this work (by Robert Anderson Wilson) it would have to be rid of its American vulgarisms and reduced in length.
Freeman, Edward Augustus.“PRESCOTT’S PHILIP THE SECOND.” Saturday Review, 7, no. 183: (30 April 1859): 531–33.
        Prescott’s powers are perfectly adapted to his work and his death (which recently happened) will really leave a void in history. (Attribution Curran Index).
Tulloch, John.“The Life of John Milton, Narrated in Connexion with the Political, Ecclesiastical, and Literary History of His Time.” North British, 30, no. 60: (May 1859): [281]-308.
        Examines the content of David Masson’s biography, including Milton’s influences and writing style, then moves on to discuss the historical context. States that this book is full and elaborate on the history of religion, politics, and literature with a minute biography of Milton. Also states that it was clearly laborious, is judiciously and well-written. Attribution Wellesley Index.
“COLLETTA’S HISTORY OF NAPLES.” Saturday Review, 7, no. 185: (14 May 1859): 594–96.
        Chapters on more recent history are the most interesting and least instructive. Italian historians (such as General Pietro Colletta) deal with contemporary historical events with animosity. Translator is S. Horner; publisher is Constable.
“Domestic Annals of Scotland.” Saturday Review, 7, no. 185: (14 May 1859): 596–97.
        Discusses the merits of social history of the period yet also addresses some of the difficulties a historian of this nature encounters. Reviewer commends the author, Robert Chambers, for his attempt at this type of history even if the style is slightly repetitive. Publisher is W. & R. Chambers.
“HISTOIRE DE MADAME DE MAINTENON.” Saturday Review, 7, no. 185: (14 May 1859): 597–98.
        Makes use of previously withheld information and leaves questions about her up to the reader to answer. Author is Duc de Noailles.
“JAMES’S NAVAL HISTORY.” Saturday Review, 7, no. 187: (28 May 1859): 654–56.
        Appears most seasonably at a time when attention is so strongly directed to the fleets.
“Bacon’s History of King Henry the Seventh.” Fraser’s Magazine, 59, no. 354: (June 1859): 697–709.
        New edition of Francis Bacon’s 1622 work, The History of the reign of King Henry the Seventh; edited by Spedding, Ellis and Heath, published by Longman 1859. Reviewer urges the reader not to be content with excerpts, and notes that even Jane Austen would have regarded this as amusing history.
Russell, Jesse Watts.“Early History of the Isle of Thanet.” Fraser’s Magazine, 59, no. 354: (June 1859): 673–78.
        Discusses the history of the Isle of Thanet, including the origin of its name and references in historical literature {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Freeman, Edward Augustus.“Mediaeval London.” Saturday Review, 7, no. 188: (4 June 1859): 689–91.
        Another volume of ancient documents and chronicles is beautifully edited (by Henry Thomas Riley) and contains many historians’ critical comments on the subject. It is a well rounded history of the period. Publisher is Longman.
“JAMES’S NAVAL HISTORY.” Saturday Review, 7, no. 189: (11 June 1859): 719–20.
        Gives ample honour to courage and ‘good seamanship’ of sailors.
“KNIGHT’S HISTORY OF ENGLAND.” Saturday Review, 7, no. 189: (11 June 1859): 723–24.
        Not readable, not suited to public taste, not instructive, and does not offer a thorough English history. .
Stephen, James Fitzjames.“ALISON’S HISTORY OF EUROPE.” Saturday Review, 7, no. 190: (18 June 1859): 755–56.
        Marginally less scathing than other reviews of Archibald Alison’s work in the SR ('he possesses merits which are less disfigured than usual in this volume’). Stephen notes that he tries to offer causes for events and in the process, ‘perverts, misstates, and disregards facts.’ (Attribution Curran Index).
“THE TRANSMISSION OF ANCIENT BOOKS.” Saturday Review, 7, no. 191: (25 June 1859): 787–88.
        This new edition of Isaac Taylor’s book is ingenious and interesting, unusually clear and acute, understands what historical evidence really is. Publisher is Jackson and Walford.
“A History of England during the Reign of George the Third.” London Review, 12, no. 24: (July 1859): 576–77.
        The reviewer expresses joy that William Massey has paid attention to a period that is ‘by no means wanting in interest,’ and explains that the first twenty years of George III’s reign are dealt with in two volumes. A short background is provided on the period and the reviewer states that Massey treats matters generally and with an impartial spirit, but for the most part they refrain from discussing his content until the continuation (see Vol 15, no 9 in 1860). Publisher is J. W. Parker.
“An Outline of English History in Verse.” London Review, 12, no. 24: (July 1859): 583.
        Very brief notice judges the volume of pleasant and easy verse to be well suited for children. Publisher is Wertheim & Co.
“THE LIFE OF CHARLES JAMES FOX.” Saturday Review, 8, no. 196: (30 July 1859): 131–32.
        Best part of this second volume of Lord John Russell’s biography was the announcement that the next volume will actually contain biographical information on Fox. Publisher is Bentley.
“Alison’s ‘History of Europe from 1815 to 1852.’” Fraser’s Magazine, 60, no. 356: (August 1859): 211–26.
        First section of a scathing 3-part review of Archibald Alison’s work (8 vols, published Blackwood & Son 1854-1859). Continued in November 1859 and November 1860.
“The Third Part of the Ecclesiastical History of John, Bishop of Ephesus.” North British, 31, no. 61: (August 1859): 56–71.
        W. Cureton has prepared an edition of this work , published 1853 by Oxford University Press. The book focuses primarily on the period of Justinian and Tiberius. The reviewer notes that Cureton ably put the book together from the material available.
Freeman, Edward Augustus.“MEMORIALS OF HENRY THE SEVENTH.” Saturday Review, 8, no. 198: (13 August 1859): 192–94.
        The volume of chronicles edited by James Gairdner proves the reviewer’s theory that there are no interesting chronicles left unpublished , given that the focus of this biography is laughable. (Attribution Curran Index).
“JOHN MILTON.” Saturday Review, 8, no. 200: (27 August 1859): 255–57.
        Shows the difference between this work of Thomas Keightley’s and that of David Masson, which has just come out on the same topic. States that Keightley’s account was more personal to Milton rather than to the times in which he lived.
“JULIUS CAESAR’S INVASION OF BRITAIN.” Saturday Review, 8, no. 200: (27 August 1859): 259–60.
        Picks apart minute errors in Thomas Lewin’s book, such as the distance between two places. Publisher is Longman.
Jeffrey, Francis.“A History of the City of Dublin (Vols 1-3).” Dublin Review, 47, no. 93: (September 1859): 1–33.
        Discusses the content of J. T. Gilbert’s book in detail. Publisher is McGlashon and Gill of Dublin, 1854. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Russell, Charles William.“History of Frederick II of Prussia, Called Frederick the Great (Vols 1 & 2).” Dublin Review, 47, no. 93: (September 1859): 132–68.
        Lengthy, detailed, and scathing examination of first two volumes of Thomas Carlyle’s book, with many excerpts. Publisher is Chapman and Hall, 1858. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Russell, Charles William.“The Life and Contemporaneous Church History of Antonio De Dominis.” Dublin Review, 47, no. 93: (September 1859): 97–110.
        States that Henry Newland’s book was a disappointment; it missed sources which were newly available and offers nothing innovative on the subject. Publisher is Parker and Son, 1858.
“HISTORY OF VICTORIA.” Saturday Review, 8, no. 203: (17 September 1859): 345–47.
        Ill arranged, ill digested, and feebly written, with a narrow view. Author is Thomas McCombie; Australian publishers: Melbourne & Sydney: Sands and Kenny; London publishers: Chapman & Hall.
Freeman, Edward Augustus.“HOW TO WRITE HISTORY.” Saturday Review, 8, no. 204: (24 September 1859): 372–73.
        Takes issue with John Brookes’s Manners and Customs of the English Nation and with poorly-written history in general. States that the work is dull and poorly written and that the author is “ very ignorant, and stupid and his enemies must have been delighted when he wrote a book.” Publisher is James Blackwood.
“The History of British Journalism.” London Review, 13, no. 25: (October 1859): [4]-34.
        The majority of this review centres around the mid-nineteenth century, however, the first eight pages discuss the development of newspapers in the seventeenth century. Using Alexander Andrews’s book as a reference (rather than reviewing it) the authors describe the status of journalism during the reigns of Charles II and William and Mary and suggest reasons for the medium’s increasing popularity.
Cecil, Robert Arthur Talbot Gascoyne (Marquis of Salisbury).“The History of New England.” Saturday Review, 8, no. 205: (1 October 1859): 400–401.
        Well-researched with a simple style Reviewer claims that John C. Palfrey’s only detriment is that he is like other ‘new school historians’ whose narratives are ‘tainted by advocacy.’
“JAMES’S NAVAL HISTORY.” Saturday Review, 8, no. 206: (8 October 1859): 422–24.
        continuation.
Freeman, Edward Augustus.“YORK AND YORKSHIRE IN THE FIFTEENTH CENTURY.” Saturday Review, 8, no. 206: (8 October 1859): 427–28.
        The content of this Surtees Society volume at first seems dull and uninviting but upon further examination it is full of instructive and curious matter. (Attribution Curran Index).
“JAMES’S NAVAL HISTORY.” Saturday Review, 8, no. 207: (15 October 1859): 453–55.
        continuation.
“JAMES’S NAVAL HISTORY.” Saturday Review, 8, no. 208: (22 October 1859): 488–90.
        continuation.
“VAUGHAN’S REVOLUTIONS IN ENGLISH HISTORY.” Saturday Review, 8, no. 209: (29 October 1859): 515–16.
        Robert Vaughan’s work is judged sensible, valuable, and instructive.
“Alison’s ‘History of Europe from 1815 to 1852.’” Fraser’s Magazine, 60, no. 359: (November 1859): 603–20.
        Second part of this scathing review, castigating Archibald Alison for partisanship and poor scholarship. This and third are signed ‘Topaze’ but Wellesley Index lists it as anonymous.
“JAMES’S NAVAL HISTORY.” Saturday Review, 8, no. 211: (12 November 1859): 583–85.
        continuation.
“THE LIFE OF CAMPBELL.” Saturday Review, 8, no. 212: (19 November 1859): 613–14.
        Biography of unremarkable man (Thomas Campbell) by Cyrus Redding is far too long.
“A School and College History of England.” Tait’s Edinburgh, 0, no. 0: (December 1859): 746.
        States that this narrative is clear and concise, fair and impartial, and condenses a large amount of information clearly and intelligibly. Reviewed: Curtis, J. C. [John Charles] A School and College History of England. London: Simpkin, Marshall, and Co.
“HISTORICAL SCOTTISH RELICS.” Saturday Review, 8, no. 214: (3 December 1859): 679–80.
        Review of a catalogue emerging from a meeting of the Archaeological Institute in Edinburgh. Too expensive to be a financial success.
Cecil, Robert Arthur Talbot Gascoyne (Marquis of Salisbury).“THE HISTORY OF BRAZIL.” Saturday Review, 8, no. 218: (31 December 1859): 815–16.
        Review of a work in German by Heinrich von Handelmann. This ‘hybrid between a history and a pamphlet’ has been written with the emigration question in mind.
“TWO PARISH HISTORIES.” Saturday Review, 9, no. 220: (14 January 1860): 53–55.
        States that Henry Alfred Napier is too imposing and discursive to be of general value, whereas the work of Henry George Davis deserves to be highly popular, useful to intelligent inhabitants of Knightsbridge, Belgravia and Pimlico.
Hine, J. (Rev).“Secret History of the Austrian Government, and of Its Systematic Persecutions of Protestants.” North British, 32, no. 63: (February 1860): 90–125.
        Recommends this narrative of the Austrian court from the accession of Ferdinand II, by Alfred Michiels, to English readers. The book is intended for general readers and is interesting, but also biased, lacks style in its writing, and expands too much on certain topics and not enough on others. Published 1859 by Chapman and Hall. Attribution (unclear) Wellesley Index.
“LIFE OF GENERAL JACKSON.” Saturday Review, 9, no. 224: (11 February 1860): 182–83.
        First of two notices. James Parton’s biography of Andrew Jackson imitates Carlyle both in style and, especially method; the results are deemed unfortunate. Publisher is Sampson, Low.
Freeman, Edward Augustus.“MORRIS’S LIFE OF ST. THOMAS BECKET.” Saturday Review, 9, no. 224: (11 February 1860): 187–88.
        The Roman Catholic canon John Morris tells the story well and agreeably. Compares this to a life by the Protestant Canon James Craigie Robertson, also reviewed in SR (17 Dec. 1859).
Cecil, Robert Arthur Talbot Gascoyne (Marquis of Salisbury).“THE LIFE OF THE DUKE OF WELLINGTON.” Saturday Review, 9, no. 225: (18 February 1860): 215–16.
        Thankless task, not true to character of Duke as his faults are slurred over and his virtues are extolled. Author is C. D. Yonge; publisher is Chapman and Hall. (Attribution Curran Index).
“THE PROBLEM OF THE PYRAMIDS.” Saturday Review, 9, no. 225: (18 February 1860): 216–17.
        John Taylor’s book demonstrates that it is absurd to expect a nineteenth-century interpreter to equal the interpretations of an ancient Egyptian.
“LIFE OF SIR CHARLES BELL.” Saturday Review, 9, no. 224: (21 February 1860): 189–90.
        Small volume by Amedee Pichot is acceptable and agreeable enough but contains more enthusiasm than knowledge.
Cecil, Robert Arthur Talbot Gascoyne (Marquis of Salisbury).“Diary of the American Revolution.” Saturday Review, 9, no. 227: (3 March 1860): 279–80.
        Reviewer claims that the reprinted documents in this collection are valuable to the history student yet only ‘furnish the mere garnish of history.’ (Attribution Curran Index).
“English Biography.” Saturday Review, 9, no. 228: (10 March 1860): 301.
        This essay discusses the merits of biography with respect to the discipline of history. ‘Biography, next to fiction, is the surest kind of writing to win the attention of all men.’ Challenges publishers to put together ‘a really good collection of short biographies of great Englishmen’ and notes that Canada and other colonies will be less likely to ‘diverge [from England] in feeling and thought’ if there are literary biographies of interest. Same goes for working-class readers.
Cecil, Robert Arthur Talbot Gascoyne (Marquis of Salisbury).“Von Sybel’s History of the French Revolution.” Saturday Review, 9, no. 228: (10 March 1860): 312–13.
        Commends the author for his straightforward style and states it is unlike other histories of the same topic, which contain flowery language and embellishments. (Attribution Curran Index).
“LORD MACAULAY’S BIOGRAPHIES.” Saturday Review, 9, no. 230: (24 March 1860): 373–74.
        Discusses Macaulay’s contribution to history and what a great loss his death was to the study of history.
“POLITICAL POEMS OF THE FOURTEENTH CENTURY.” Saturday Review, 9, no. 230: (24 March 1860): 377–78.
        Well edited, instructive, and amusing collection in the Rolls Series, edited by Thomas Wright.
“HISTORICAL ALLIES.” Saturday Review, 9, no. 231: (31 March 1860): 394.
        This essay discusses the history and importance of various British allies, including France and Germany.
“SECRETAN’S LIFE OF ROBERT NELSON.” Saturday Review, 9, no. 231: (31 March 1860): 408–9.
        Too much praise and dwells too much on detail ; thus is wearisome and heavy.
“THE FRENCH REVOLUTION OF 1789.” Saturday Review, 9, no. 231: (31 March 1860): 407–8.
        Impartial, graphic, and shows the French Revolution from the perspective of the lower classes. Discusses how John S. C. Abbott compares to and strays from other historians’ style. Publisher is New York: Harper & Brothers.
“Revolutions in English History.” Fraser’s Magazine, 61, no. 364: (April 1860): 485–500.
        Reviewer values the condensed nature of Robert Vaughan’s first volume, Revolutions of Race, published by J. W. Parker, 1859.
“THIERS ON THE FALL OF NAPOLEON.” Saturday Review, 9, no. 232: (7 April 1860): 436–37.
        No writer has a more atheistical view of history, but Thiers is a literary genius; the narrative is powerful, easy and pure of style.
“MEMOIRS OF THE FIRST EARL OF SHAFTESBURY.” Saturday Review, 9, no. 233: (14 April 1860): 469–70.
        William Dougal Christie belongs to new school of biographers as he has self-sacrificing devotion to historical accuracy and to the material presented.
“SIR ROBERT WILSON’S RUSSIAN JOURNAL.” Saturday Review, 9, no. 233: (14 April 1860): 471–72.
        New and important contribution to history of the period.
“FILIPPO STROZZI.” Saturday Review, 9, no. 235: (28 April 1860): 534–36.
        Labour of work paid off as this book by T. Adolphus Trollope is pleasant reading for ‘friends of modern liberty’ and contributes to understanding of past and present Italian history. Publisher is Chapman and Hall.
Purcell, Edmund Sheridan.“A History of the Italian Republics, Being a View of the Origin, Progress, and Fall of Italian Freedom.” Dublin Review, 48, no. 95: (May 1860): 150–89.
        Discusses various works on Roman history (Sismondi, Maguire, Gretton). {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“LIFE OF GENERAL JACKSON.” Saturday Review, 9, no. 236: (5 May 1860): 571–73.
        Second notice of Parton’s biography. Clearly presents hero-worshipping .
“FROUDE’S HISTORY OF ENGLAND.-VOLS. V. AND VI.” Saturday Review, 9, no. 237: (12 May 1860): 608–9.
        Scathing review notes that Froude’s "merits are picturesqueness, a clear and graceful, though somewhat effeminate style, and an insight into the varieties of character. . . . His demerits are a more than feminine fancifulness, and a more than feminine lack of justice, ... an ignorance of collateral subjects . . . and of history other than that of the particular country and period on which he is engaged.
“RAWLINSON’S HERODOTUS.” Saturday Review, 9, no. 237: (12 May 1860): 610–12.
        Admirable and impartial.
“CUNNINGHAM’S CHURCH HISTORY OF SCOTLAND.” Saturday Review, 9, no. 238: (19 May 1860): 646–47.
        Fair, candid, grave; tone good and honourable. .
Freeman, Edward Augustus.“BARTHOLOMEW COTTON’S HISTORY.” Saturday Review, 9, no. 240: (2 June 1860): 715–16.
        Edited for the Rolls Series by Henry Richards Luard. Valuable, as it contains contemporary narrative of part of the 13th century which illustrates medieval notions of literary property. (Attribution Curran Index).
Freeman, Edward Augustus.“LAMARTINE’S ‘MARY STUART.’” Saturday Review, 9, no. 242: (16 June 1860): 777–78.
        Pretty and pleasantly written but adds nothing new.
Freeman, Edward Augustus.“MRS. THOMSON’S LIFE OF GEORGE VILLIERS.” Saturday Review, 9, no. 243: (23 June 1860): 815–16.
        Discusses how women write biographies and compares the author (Katherine [Mrs A. T.] Thomson) only to other ‘half-learned’ female writers.
“The Life of Sir Henry Havelock.” Saturday Review, 9, no. 243: (23 June 1860): 816–17.
        Biography of the hero of the Indian Empire, by John Clark Marshman. A ‘spirited story’. Publisher is Longman.
Donne, William Bodham.“Froude’s History of the Reigns of Edward VI and Mary.” Fraser’s Magazine, 62, no. 367: (July 1860): 1–17.
        Author is James Anthony Froude; under review are volumes 5 and 6 of his History of England from the Fall of Wolsey to the Death of Elizabeth. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“History of the Christian Church to the Reformation. From the German of Professor Kurtz.” London Review, 14, no. 28: (July 1860): 553.
        Very brief review praises Kurtz’s book highly, calling it a ‘map of Church history ... careful in detail’, as well as interesting to read. Translator is not named; publisher is T. & T. Clark.
“MASSEY’S HISTORY OF ENGLAND-VOL III.” Saturday Review, 10, no. 245: (7 July 1860): 18–19.
        Sensible and candid and the period examined is remarkable. .
“BONNECHOSE’S HISTORY OF ENGLAND.” Saturday Review, 10, no. 248: (28 July 1860): 115–16.
        Comments on French historiography in general and this work by Emile de Bonnechose in particular. Paris publisher is Didier et Co.
Donnelly, Thomas.“An Introduction to the History of Jurisprudence.” Dublin Review, 48, no. 96: (August 1860): 451–97.
        Discussing Denis Caulfield Heron’s book in detail and offers lengthy excerpts. The reviewer focuses a lot on the natural law content of the work. Publisher is J.W. Parker. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“A DARK PAGE FROM RUSSIAN HISTORY.” Chambers’s, 0, no. 344: (4 August 1860): 77–79.
        The story of the late 18th century deception, torture and murder of Princess Tarranakoff (descendent of the Russian royal family) at the command of Catherine the Great.
“THE HISTORY OF FRANCE.” Saturday Review, 10, no. 250: (11 August 1860): 177–79.
        Not a philosophical nor an original book ‘though we readily admit its merit as an elaborate compilation, and its value as a repository of historical facts.’ Author Parke Godwin is new to the reviewer; publisher is Sampson Low; New York publisher Harper & Brothers.
“THE WARS OF THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY.” Saturday Review, 10, no. 252: (25 August 1860): 244–45.
        First of several reviews of various volumes. Sir Edward Cust’s book does good service to the British Army and the nation as a whole. Publisher is Mitchell’s Military Library.
“GERMAN PICTURES OF OLD ENGLISH HISTORY.” Saturday Review, 10, no. 254: (8 September 1860): 305–6.
        Reinhold Pauli tends to lean toward philosophical views, but he sketches characters admirably. Book is in German; publisher Williams & Norgate.
Freeman, E. A.“JUSTICE UNDER THE TUDORS.” Saturday Review, 10, no. 255: (15 September 1860): 327–28.
        Discusses the invalid sources and other problems with Froude’s work and with Charles Knight’s Popular History of England. (Attribution Curran Index).
Freeman, Edward Augustus.“KETT’S REBELLION IN NORFOLK.” Saturday Review, 10, no. 255: (15 September 1860): 338–39.
        Reviewer thinks the author, the Rev. F. W. Russell, failed in this book in his aspiration to do the work of a historian; he remains ‘a zealous and painstaking antiquary’. Publisher is Longman and William Penny. (Attribution Curran Index).
“SHARPE’S HISTORY OF EGYPT.” Saturday Review, 10, no. 255: (15 September 1860): 336–37.
        Useful, plain and straightforward. Useful to the unlearned. Author is Samuel Sharpe; publisher is Moxon & Co.
“THE WARS OF THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY.” Saturday Review, 10, no. 255: (15 September 1860): 337–38.
        Second notice of Cust’s first volume says it should be read by every officer of the army.
“FORBES’S HISTORY OF CHESS.” Saturday Review, 10, no. 256: (22 September 1860): 368–69.
        Author is Duncan Forbes; he is diligent and a distinguished authority, but lacks literary ability and his book is disfigured by ‘trivial political and personal allusions, couched in a tone particularly feminine’, Publisher is Allen and Co.
“THE WARS OF THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY.-VOL. II.” Saturday Review, 10, no. 260: (20 October 1860): 490–91.
        This is a second notice of Cust’s second volume, continuing from 13 October.
“Alison’s ‘History of Europe from 1815 to 1852.’” Fraser’s Magazine, 62, no. 371: (November 1860): 660–78.
        Completion of Frasers’ three-part article on this subject. Signed ‘Topaze’ but listed by Wellesley Index as anonymous.
“BUTT’S HISTORY OF ITALY.” Saturday Review, 10, no. 265: (24 November 1860): 664–65.
        First notice. Isaac Butt’s book is useful, at least for the general reader; it provides clearness of conception. Publisher is Chapman and Hall.
“Butt’s History of Italy.” Saturday Review, 10, no. 266: (1 December 1860): 697–99.
        Second notice. The reviewer offers little critique of the book yet relays details about the subject and uses Butt’s narrative to support his own claims.
“Lorimer’s Scottish Reformation.” Saturday Review, 10, no. 270: (29 December 1860): 843–44.
        Criticizes the author for writing the volume in a ‘narrow, sectarian and unphilosophical spirit.’ States the book is arbitrarily organized and one-sided.
“NORMANS AND SAXONS; OR, STORIES OF THE CONQUEST.” Boy’s Own Magazine, 7, no. 1: (1 January 1861): 20.
        Edgar De Roos tells the story of how the Normans conquered France in the ninth century and became more refined in manners. The second part details events leading to the Norman conquest of England in the eleventh century.
“Bollaert’s Antiquities of South America.” Saturday Review, 11, no. 271: (5 January 1861): 22–23.
        Reviewer states that, while the volume proves that the author is a ‘painstaking and intelligent observer,’ the book is not well-written.
“M. THIERS AND THE EMPEROR OF THE FRENCH.” Saturday Review, 11, no. 271: (5 January 1861): 7–8.
        Comments on rumours of Thiers taking office under the government of France.
“Home Life of English Ladies in the Seventeenth Century.” Saturday Review, 11, no. 272: (12 January 1861): 48–49.
        Reviewer states that ‘ it is a tedious stringing together of biographical facts by obvious comments and commonplace reflections.’ The subject, though interesting, is not done justice. ‘By the author of Magdalen Stafford’. Publisher is Bell and Daldy.
“HESSEY’S BAMPTON LECTURES.” Saturday Review, 11, no. 273: (19 January 1861): 72–73.
        Useful to a reader of ordinary education and intelligence.
Freeman, Edward Augustus.“Hook’s Lives of the Archbishops of Canterbury.” Saturday Review, 11, no. 274: (26 January 1861): 98–100.
        Well-written history of the church; even though a professional historian might have taken a more critical approach, the average reader will learn more from this book than any other on the subject. (Attribution Curran Index).
Russell, Charles William.“History of England, from the Fall of Wolsey to the Death of Elizabeth (Vols 5-6).” Dublin Review, 49, no. 98: (February 1861): 263–300.
        Claims that these volumes are not as well done as the previous ones; the book is becoming a rather tedious narrative. The reviewer observes that Froude, like many contemporary historians, ignores the influence of the supernatural. Publisher is Parker, 1860.
Fairbairn, Patrick.“Sunday: Its Origin, History, and Present Obligation; Considered in Eight Lectures, Preached before the University of Oxford in the Year 1860, on the Foundation of the Late Rev. John Bampton, M.A.” North British, 34, no. 67: (February 1861): 218–38.
        Discusses the content of this work, by James Augustus Hessey, listing its successes and failures, and stating that it contains no original or fresh material. Also discusses the usefulness of the Bampton lectures in general. Published by John Murray. Attribution Wellesley Index.
Smith, Bernard.“The History of Herodotus, a New English Version, Edited with Copious Notes and Appendices, &c.” Dublin Review, 49, no. 98: (February 1861): 348–67.
        Offers a detailed discussion of the content of George Rawlinson’s translation; states that ancient history is once again in favour and this work specifically offers a style that makes for a good general reading book. Praises the quality of the translation. Publisher is John Murray, 1858-1860. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“NORMANS AND SAXONS; OR, STORIES OF THE CONQUEST.” Boy’s Own Magazine, no. 2: (1 February 1861)
        In the third part, De Roos begins in the fifth century with the arrival of the Saxons in England. He details how the Saxons helped free the Britons from the forces of the Picts and Scots, then discusses the arrival of the Danes in the ninth century and follows their influence in England until the twelfth century.
“EDMUND BURKE.” Saturday Review, 11, no. 276: (9 February 1861): 143–44.
        Review of third and last volume of Thomas Macknight’s biography. Too long, unsatisfactory, and incomplete. Tone is reminiscent of the Cockney school of comic and sentimental satire, which does not suit this higher class of literature.
“KEIGHTLEY’S CRUSADERS.” Saturday Review, 11, no. 276: (9 February 1861): 147–49.
        Good service to historical literature but unreadable for young readers and adults who do not have the leisure to read lengthy works.
Cecil, Robert Arthur Talbot Gascoyne (Marquis of Salisbury).“RANKE’S ENGLISH HISTORY.” Saturday Review, 11, no. 276: (9 February 1861): 145–46.
        This review of the German-language edition published by D. Nutt characterizes the author as ‘cautious, critical . . . distrustful of large views and hasty generalizations’ and the book ‘with its patient analysis of facts and its want of imaginative grasp’, still a splendid contribution. A second notice appears March 9th. (Attribution Curran Index).
“THE LIFE AND TIMES OF PALEARIO.” Saturday Review, 11, no. 276: (9 February 1861): 149–50.
        Strong writer, candid; but this study of Italian reformers in the 16th century demonstrates a bias against the Roman Catholic Church. Author is M. Yonge; publisher is Bell & Daldy.
“NORMANS AND SAXONS; OR, STORIES OF THE CONQUEST.” Boy’s Own Magazine, no. 3: (1 March 1861): 106.
        De Roos begins chapter six by explaining that Edward the Confessor was made King in 1042, but had a strained relationship with Godwin due to Edward’s Norman characteristics and Godwin’s refusal to adopt Norman dress. William and Matilda’s marriage is discussed and the seventh chapter focuses on Siward the Dane’s time in England.
“The Spanish Conquest in America. Vol 4.” Saturday Review, 11: (2 March 1861): 222–24.
        This review of the conclusion of Arthur Helps’s work notes that while this is not as entertaining as the previous volumes, the whole work’s strength is the author’s analysis of the material, which focuses on the relationships among Spanish, native-American and African-American peoples.
“History of the Venetian Republic: Her Rise, Her Greatness, and Her Civilization.” London Review, 16, no. 31: (April 1861): 272–74.
        The reviewer claims that the author, W. Carew Hazlitt, gives a consecutive history of the political advancement and territorial gains of Venice during nine hundred years, from its relationship with the Byzantine empire to the Reformation. The reviewer complains that Hazlitt lacks in style and that the book is far from eloquent.
“NORMANS AND SAXONS; OR, STORIES OF THE CONQUEST.” Boy’s Own Magazine, no. 4: (1 April 1861)
        Chapter nine begins with the death of the Earl of Godwin and leads up to the events in 1066. Chapter ten discusses the preparations William made with continental Europe for the battle. Chapter eleven discusses the difficulties Harold had getting the Northumbrians to accept Tostig as their Earl and chapter twelve follows the story of Tostig.
Lancaster, Henry Hill.“History of the United Netherlands, from the Death of William the Silent to the Synod of Dort; with a Full View of the English-Dutch Struggle against Spain, and of the Origin and Destruction of the Spanish Armada.” North British, 34, no. 68: (May 1861): 428–51.
        States that John Lothrop Motley’s two-volume narrative of the Netherlands in the sixteenth century is entertaining and instructive. It presents the characters elaborately and vividly as the author has the rare ability to sympathize with his subjects. Also observes that it is extensively researched, presents findings clearly and powerfully, and is written with feeling and fervour. Attribution Wellesley Index.
Ffoulkes, Edmund Salusbury.“Lectures on the History of the Eastern Church.” Dublin Review, 50, no. 99: (May 1861): 92–121.
        Discusses the content of Arthur Penrhyn Stanley’s book; compares it unfavourably to past works on the topic, provides extensive excerpts as evidence of problems. Publisher is John Murray. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“NORMANS AND SAXONS; OR, STORIES OF THE CONQUEST.” Boy’s Own Magazine, no. 5: (1 May 1861)
        Chapter thirteen begins in the summer of 1066 with William still gathering continental warriors and Harold attending to his regal duties and marriages. Chapters fourteen and fifteen detail the first steps of the Battle on Friday 13th October 1066.
“AN UNKNOWN PAGE IN HISTORY.” Chambers’s, 0, no. 385: (18 May 1861): 313–15.
        An account of the Northumberland town of Hexam, discussing events since the 15th century. The ‘unknown page’ refers to the Hexam riot of 1761.
Froude, James Anthony.“Queen Elizabeth, Lord Robert Dudley, and Amy Robsart; a Story from the Archives of Simancas.” Fraser’s Magazine, VOLUME 63, JUNE 1861: (June 1861): 659–69.
        This article is written while Froude is editor of Fraser’s. Explains the importance of diplomatic correspondence to historical research and interpretation. Continued in the August issue.  (Attribution: Wellesley Index).
Sandars, Thomas Collett.“Buckle’s History of Civilization in England. Vol. 2.” Saturday Review, 11, no. 292: (1 June 1861): 561–62.
        Thomas Henry Buckle’s history continues to be readable, energetic and full of intriguing ideas. But it is ‘disfigured by little flourishes of animosity’. Published by J. W. Parker.
“NORMANS AND SAXONS; OR, STORIES OF THE CONQUEST.” Boy’s Own Magazine, no. 6: (1 June 1861)
        In chapter eighteen, De Roos chronicles the Battle of Hastings from the Norman religious ceremonies to ‘William places the standard.’  Chapter nineteen discusses the retrieval of Harold’s body. In three short chapters De Roos overviews the victory ceremonies.
Bernard, Montague.“Ancient Law: Its Connection with the Early History of Society and Its Relation to Modern Ideas.” Quarterly, 110, no. 219: (July 1861): 114–38.
        The book is judged an innovative and important work by a distinguished jurist. Reviewed: Maine, Henry Sumner. Ancient Law: its Connection with the Early History of Society and its Relation to Modern Ideas. 1861. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“History of England, from the Fall of Wolsey to the Death of Elizabeth.” London Review, 16, no. 32: (July 1861): 473–503.
        Reviews vols 1-4 of J. A. Froude’s book, beginning with a discussion of contemporary historical writing. Discusses a passage that appeared in Oxford Essays for 1855 which the reviewer believes provides insight into J. A. Froude’s opinions and reasoning. Froude’s investigation of the origins of the Reformation in England is discussed at length, with long blocks of text quoted and dissected. The review is mixed, with positive comments interspersed with criticism of Froude’s characterization of Henry VIII.. Publisher is J. W. Parker.
“Personal History of Lord Bacon.” London Review, 16, no. 32: (July 1861): 372–93.
        In this review of Hepworth Dixon’s book, the reviewer provides a biography of Lord Bacon as well as political and economical information about England in the sixteenth century. The reviewer explains that Bacon has a bad reputation due to various biographers and historians, particularly Macaulay. Although they applauded Dixon’s attempt to vindicate Bacon, they do not agree with all of his arguments. Publisher is John Murray.
“Revolutions in English History.” London Review, 16, no. 32: (July 1861): 562–64.
        The reviewers are very satisfied with Robert Vaughn’s work, of which this is Vol. II, Revolutions in Religion. They commend the originality of the work and agree with his breakdown of Revolutions into race, religion, government, and social power and explain that they look forward to the coming volumes.
“NORMANS AND SAXONS; OR, STORIES OF THE CONQUEST.” Boy’s Own Magazine, no. 7: (1 July 1861)
        Chapter twenty-four tells the story of how Matilda gained revenge on Brihtrick for not returning her affections.  Chapter twenty-five recounts a counter attack from the Saxons and Danes in the North. Chapters twenty-six to twenty-nine continue chronicling the attempts to reign in the North and the last deals with religious matters.
Froude, James Anthony.“A Few More Words from the Archives of Simancas.” Fraser’s Magazine, VOLUME 64, AUGUST 1861: (August 1861): 135–50.
        Continuation of the article of June 1861, providing material from further research among the documents. Refers to criticism in Saturday Review.  (Attribution: Wellesley Index).
Smith, Walter Chalmers.“History of Civilisation in England.” North British, 35, no. 69: (August 1861): 253–88.
        Offers a discussion of the content of the second volume of Thomas Henry Buckle’s book, examining its omissions. States that Buckle is often one sided and notes that his work contains elements of truth but not the whole truth. Attribution Wellesley Index.
Tulloch, John.“Lectures on the History of the Eastern Church; with an Introduction on the Study of Ecclesiastical History.” North British, 35, no. 69: (August 1861): 82–106.
        Author is Arthur Penryhn Stanley; reviewer notes that the book is not a continuous and complete history but is nevertheless interesting, instructive, and pleasant. Attribution Wellesley Index.
Gilbert, John Thomas.“Lectures on the MS. Materials of Ancient Irish History.” Dublin Review, 50, no. 100: (August 1861): 475–98.
        Briefly discusses Eugene O’Curry’s past works and discusses the content in detail with excerpts; states that this book is interesting and useful. Publisher is James Duffy of Dublin and London. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“NORMANS AND SAXONS; OR, STORIES OF THE CONQUEST.” Boy’s Own Magazine, no. 8: (1 August 1861)
        In chapter thirty DeRoos explains that William requested the presence of the Saxon Earls, Edwin and Morkar and they were slow to respond. Chapter thirty-one tells a side-story of Ivo-Taille Bois’s escapes in England. Chapter thirty-three investigates Scotland and Malcolm Canmore’s marriage to Margaret Athelby ensuring that the Scots eventually assisted with the conquest in the north.
“WHAT IS THE GOOD OF HISTORY?” Chambers’s, 0, no. 400: (31 August 1861): 136–37.
        Discusses the question of profiting from the lessons of history to prevent the repetition of errors. Offers examples from problems with respect to the American colonies in the late eighteenth century.
“Parish Registers: Their History and Contents.” Fraser’s Magazine, 64, no. 381: (September 1861): 357–65.
        Examines parish registers from the 16th century until the 18th century looking at their content and usefulness as a historical source.
“NORMANS AND SAXONS; OR, STORIES OF THE CONQUEST.” Boy’s Own Magazine, no. 9: (1 September 1861)
        In chapter thirty-five De Roos chronicles the last attempts of Cospatrick to maintain order in Northumberland before his death in 1073. In chapter thirty-six Edgar Atheling finds safe refuge in Scotland and chapter thirty-seven details the death of William the Conqueror’s comrade in arms, William Fitz Osbourne and the imprisonment of his son Roger.
Downes, John.“History of the Life and Times of Edmund Burke.” North British, 35, no. 70: (November 1861): 445–79.
        States that Thomas Macknight’s book is the best biography of Burke to appear; it is full and complete, candid and unbiased. Goes on the offer a detailed account of the work’s content. Publisher is Chapman and Hall, 1858-1860. Attribution Wellesley Index.
Morris, William O’Connor.“Irish History and Irish Character.” Fraser’s Magazine, 64, no. 383: (November 1861): 644–58.
        Morris notes that Goldwin Smith’s book (published J. W. Parker 1861) is not really a history, but rather ‘a sketch of the leading causes and influences which have fashioned Irish national life’.  (Attribution: Wellesley Index).
“History of Civilization in England.” London Review, 17, no. 34: (January 1862): [301]-325.
        This is a review of Buckle’s History of Civilization in England, noting that this second volume focuses on Spain and Scotland. The reviewers explain that Buckle uses Spain as a test case to promote his argument that ‘all communities of men are also under the influences of general causes which force them to advance or decline’ and while they conditionally accept his theories on Spain, they disagree with his treatment of Scotland, claiming that he has misunderstood the superstition of the Scotch people.
Froude, James Anthony.“Santa Teresa; a Psychological Study.” Fraser’s Magazine, VOLUME 65, JANUARY 1862: (January 1862): 59–74.
        Article about a 16th-century Spanish nun, writer of the Counter-Reformation.  (Attribution: Wellesley Index).
“HISTORY AND ARTICLES OF MASONRY.” Saturday Review, 13, no. 323: (4 January 1862): 23–24.
        Edition of a primary document held in the British Museum; by Matthew Cooke; publisher is Bro. Richard Spencer. The review ridicules the practices and beliefs of the freemasons.
“ALISON’S LIVES OF LORD CASTLEREAGH AND SIR C. STEWART.” Saturday Review, 13, no. 325: (18 January 1862): 79–81.
        Interesting and simply narrated.
Freeman, E. A.“ENGLISH DOMESTIC MANNERS BEFORE THE NORMAN CONQUEST.” Saturday Review, 13, no. 325: (18 January 1862): 77–78.
        Thomas Wright’s book is well-illustrated, entertaining, and valuable. A second notice appeared 15 February 1862. (Attribution Curran Index).
“HISTORY OF PRINTING IN FRANCE.” Saturday Review, 13, no. 325: (18 January 1862): 78–79.
        The book under review is a Histoire du Livre en France by Edmond Werdet (Second part; published in Paris by Dentu). ‘The very French title of this book does not at once carry its meaning with it to an English reader. The “History of the Book” means nothing else than a history of the crafts of the printer and bookseller, with occasional notices of their kinsman, the binder. What the “Transformation of the Book” may be we can only guess; most likely it is an Imperial way of expressing the change from written to printed books.’ Despite its dismissive note, the review observes that the book contains ‘a great deal of curious matter’.
“ROMAN HISTORY AT ROME.” Saturday Review, 13, no. 325: (18 January 1862): 74–75.
        Allows readers to easily learn about the vestiges of Old Rome which survive below the new Rome. Book is in French; author is J. J. Ampere; published Paris: Michel Levy Freres; London: Jeffs.
“CANADA-PAST AND PRESENT.” Saturday Review, 13, no. 326: (25 January 1862): 95–96.
        This essay discusses the interaction between the British and the Americans in the war of 1812 and throughout the nineteenth century, and the changes that took place in Canada as a result of the introduction of the railway and telegraph.
Cecil, Robert Arthur Talbot Gascoyne (Marquis of Salisbury).“LORD CRANBORNE’S HISTORICAL ESSAYS.” Saturday Review, 13, no. 326: (25 January 1862): 105–6.
        Of great merit, the essays cover a wide array of countries; the style is admirable and the work is accurate. (Attribution Curran Index).
“THE CAMPAIGN OF 1799.” Saturday Review, 13, no. 329: (15 February 1862): 191–92.
        This account of the Duke of York’s campaign in Holland in 1799 (‘By a Subaltern’) is clear and satisfactory.
Freeman, Edward Augustus.“HOOK’S LIVES OF THE ARCHBISHOPS OF CANTERBURY.” Saturday Review, 13, no. 330: (22 February 1862): 215–16.
        In this latest in his series of biographies, Walter Farquar Hook ‘sees the events of the twelfth century through the spectacles of modern Anglicanism’.  (Attribution Curran Index).
Freeman, Edward Augustus.“FINLAY’S HISTORY OF THE GREEK REVOLUTION.” Saturday Review, 13, no. 331: (1 March 1862): 242–44.
        High praise for the final volume of George Finlay’s history (2 vol, published by Blackwood). Judged remarkable and original; not likely to become popular but useful to historical inquirers. Freeman compares it with several other histories of Greece. (Attribution Curran Index).
“HISTORY OF SPAIN.” Saturday Review, 13, no. 331: (1 March 1862): 248–49.
        Obvious political views displayed which date to Modesto Lafuente’s earlier identity as a journalist; now, however, he has appeared as an historian. The work is correct, uses a pure style, offers a variety of subjects which are well distributed and skillfully connected.
Cecil, Robert Arthur Talbot Gascoyne (Marquis of Salisbury).“THE HISTORY OF THE DANCE.” Saturday Review, 13, no. 331: (1 March 1862): 247–48.
        This book in the German language, by Albert Czerwinski, offers a tolerably clear view of the dances of various nations. Published in Leipzig: Weber; and London: Williams and Norgate.
Freeman, Edward Augustus.“SALVERTE’S HISTORY OF NAMES.” Saturday Review, 13, no. 333: (15 March 1862): 304–5.
        Accurate but shows little critical power and is not well translated.
“THE WARS OF CANADA.” Saturday Review, 13, no. 333: (15 March 1862): 307–8.
        The book is a reprint of a work commissioned by the Duke of Wellington in 1826 to report on the state of the Canada-US frontier; author is Major-General Sir James Carmichael-Smyth. Edited by his son, Sir James Carmichael. Publisher is Tinsley Brothers.
“ARNOLD’S HISTORY OF LORD DALHOUSIE’S ADMINISTRATION.” Saturday Review, 13, no. 334: (22 March 1862): 333–34.
        Full and lively descriptions. Author is Edwin Arnold; publisher is Saunders, Otley, & Co.
“History of the Martyrs in Palestine, by Eusebius, Bishop of Caesarea, Discovered in a Very Ancient Syriac Manuscript.” London Review, 18, no. 35: (April 1862): 237–39.
        The review is attributed by Wellesley Index to Rigg, who praise the editor, William Cureton, for his accurate, precise and complete translation of Eusebius’s ‘memorial of the piety, patience, and faith of the days of old.’
Moule, Frederick J.“Hutchins’s History of Dorset.” Quarterly, 3, no. 222: (April 1862): 281–318.
        Essay covers seven works on Dorset. That of Hutchins is a re-issue, praised for ‘laborious collection of detail of it’. Reviewed: Hutchins’s History of Dorset. Part I and II. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Monsell, Richard William.“Lectures on the History of the Eastern Church.” London Review, 18, no. 35: (April 1862): 177–201.
        Monsell states that A. P. Stanley’s ‘Eastern Churches’ lectures allow Nikon to be placed in his ‘rightful place between Vladimir and Peter the Great as the center of a trio around whose names the history and fates of the Russian Church might be made to revolve.’ A short biography of Nikon prefaces comparisons with Charles I, Strafford and Laud in England. The reviewer uses passages from Stanley and A. N. Mouravieff (whose history of the church in Russia is also reviewed) to chronicle Nikon’s career: he allowed the ‘ignorance of the heads of the Russian Church to [to cease] and their ferocity was by him softened into an almost Christian type of character.’ (Attribution: Wellesley Index).
“ENGLISH KINGS AND QUEENS FROM THE CONQUEST.” Boy’s Own Magazine, 1 April 1862
        This article provides statistical data on the Kings and Queens of England. For example, their average lifespan, those with the longest lives, number of times certain monarchs were crowned and the longest reigns.  Also included is the burial places of many monarchs.
“HISTORY OF THE OPERA.” Saturday Review, 13, no. 339: (26 April 1862): 481–82.
        Pleasant and readable form and pleasant style. Author is Sutherland Edwards; publisher is Allen and Co.
“LUDLOW’S HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES.” Saturday Review, 13, no. 339: (26 April 1862): 474–75.
        Partisan writer who tends to select topics that are current and discuss why they are popular.
“THE LIFE OF THE DUKE OF WELLINGTON.” Saturday Review, 13, no. 339: (26 April 1862): 478–79.
        Book is successful, makes good use of materials, is accurate and complete. Full title given as Gleig and Brialmont’s Life of Wellington. 2nd Ed, condensed by the Rev. G. R. Gleig; published Longmans. However the review refers only to Gleig. See above for a review of Brialmont in French, 24 October 1857.
Russell, Charles William.“Collections on Irish Church History.” Dublin Review, 51, no. 102: (May 1862): 379–404.
        Examines the content of the Rev. Daniel McCarthy’s edition of materials concerning the 18th and 18th century history of the Irish church. Publisher is Warren, of Dublin, 1861. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Abraham, George Whitely.“History of Friederich II. of Prussia, Called Frederick the Great (Vol 3).” Dublin Review, 51, no. 102: (May 1862): 404–28.
        Discusses the content of Carlyle’s work with lengthy excerpts. Publisher is Chapman and Hall,. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“Science of History.” Fraser’s Magazine, 65, no. 389: (May 1862): 651–60.
        Examines how history can be viewed as a science by looking at how the discipline involves provable theories and hypotheses; discusses what history can offer in terms of predicting the future and learning from the past.
Merivale, Charles.“JOHN ROGERS.” Saturday Review, 13, no. 340: (3 May 1862): 505–6.
        An American biographer, Joseph L. Chester, has written about the compiler of the first authorised English Bible. Review describes it as enthusiastic and bringing out individuality and spirit of the subject, while commenting in passing on the current conflict in the United States. (Attribution Curran Index).
Freeman, E. A.“OLIVER’S HISTORY OF EXETER.” Saturday Review, 13, no. 340: (3 May 1862): 508–9.
        The Rev. George Oliver’s book is ‘not local enough’ and thus not what a history of an ancient city should be; rather it offers a broader history of England. Exeter publisher is William Roberts; London publisher is Longman. (Attribution Curran Index).
“THOMAS JEFFERSON.” Saturday Review, 13, no. 341: (10 May 1862): 536–37.
        This biography in the French language is compiled with care and skill. Author is Cornelis De Witt; Paris publisher is Didier et Cie.
“THEBES AND ITS TOMBS.” Saturday Review, 13, no. 342: (17 May 1862): 565–66.
        This much-anticipated work by A. Henry Rhind has a lot of material, but nothing to say and is not well-researched; overall of not much interest. Publisher is Longman.
“THE TRAIL OF HISTORY.” Saturday Review, 13, no. 343: (24 May 1862): 596–97.
        The author, the Rev. T. M. Merriman of Vermont ‘has undertaken to rearrange the history of the world.’ He attempts to show Sunday School children that every great event before Christ has a corresponding event after. Ridiculed for being pretentious and for religious periodization.
Freeman, Edward Augustus.“CALENDAR OF DOMESTIC STATE PAPERS, 1631-3.” Saturday Review, 13, no. 346: (14 June 1862): 690–91.
        This particular volume not deal with any exciting matters. Note that the SR reviews numerous volumes of the State Papers Domestic.
“PAUL LOUIS COURIER.” Saturday Review, 13, no. 348: (28 June 1862): 748–49.
        Comments on the complete works in French of Paul Louis Courier, a new edition published by Didot in Paris. The work throws light on France in the period 1815-1825.
“Church and State Two Hundred Years Ago; Being a History of Ecclesiastical Affairs from 1660 to 1663.” London Review, 18, no. 36: (July 1862): 493–534.
        The reviewer begins by reflecting on the contemporary status of religion versus the status two hundred years prior. The majority of the review uses excerpts from John Stoughton’s book to examine religion in the seventeenth century. Key issues included are nonconformity, the taking of the Covenant, and the Book of Common Prayer. However, the reviewer complains that the range of material is small and that the subject requires another volume.
“History of England from the Fall of Wolsey to the Death of Elizabeth.” London Review, 18, no. 36: (July 1862): 318–50.
        Review of volumes 5 and 6 of Froude’s book, a fraught discussion of the reigns of Edward VI and Mary I.
Michell, T.“History of the Russian Empire.” Quarterly, 113, no. 225: (January 1863): 60–95.
        Laments the state of Russian historiography, in a discussion of 12 works, some in Russian, some in French, as well as several in English. Reviewed: Karamzin, A. History of the Russian Empire. St Petersburg, 1842. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“History of Federal Government.” Dublin Review, 52, no. 104: (April 1863): 579–80.
        States that Edward A. Freeman’s book is interesting, valuable, and instructive; expects that when it is complete is will offer a full account.
“The History of Girolamo Savonarola and of His Times.” Dublin Review, 1, no. 1: (July 1863): 232–38.
        States that Leonard Homier’s translation of Pasquale Villari’s book is written with a good acquaintance of Italian history, a lively style, and a clear head; described as well-researched, accurate, and overall satisfactory. Publisher is Longman.
“HISTORY IN COMMON WORDS.” Chambers’s, 0, no. 501: (8 August 1863): 92–94.
        Alphabetical list of words derived from ancient languages which have been incorporated into English; their origin and meaning.
Barnes, William.“On the Credibility of Old Song-History and Tradition.” Fraser’s Magazine, 68, no. 405: (September 1863): 394–401.
        Discusses the use and validity of song as a historical source and the scrutiny of this type of source. Looks at specific songs that can shed light on the history of various countries (those of Romans, Celts, Persians, Welsh, Gauls, etc). {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Milman, H. H.“History of England.” Quarterly, 114, no. 228: (October 1863): 510–37.
        These are described as ‘remarkable volumes, which shed new light . . . on that most important and critical epoch in the history of the world’. The style is excellent, with ‘singularly perspicuous English’ though the mode of composition is faulty (documentary evidence is provided in the text); but Froude’s judgment of the Queen is severe. Reviewed: Froude, James Anthony. History of England. Reign of Elizabeth. vol. 1 &2. 1863. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“Lectures on the History of the Jewish Church (Part 1).” Dublin Review, 1, no. 2: (October 1863): 530–33.
        States that Arthur P. Stanley’s book contains colourful and fresh sketches but that these are not accompanied with answers to related questions. Also observes that Stanley lacks qualifications as a historian and that this work contains many deep errors that will later be addressed in a later review. Publisher is John Murray.
“An Episode in the Modern History of the English Church.” Fraser’s Magazine, 68, no. 408: (December 1863): 746–53.
        Discusses the 1771 House of Commons session when the clergy challenged their impeded liberation. Discusses the years and individual influence that led up the session and the events that transpired afterwards.
“Revolutions in English History, Vol. 3.” Fraser’s Magazine, 69, no. 410: (February 1864): 199–212.
        Reviewer (signed ’K’) commends Robert Vaughan’s third volume, published by Longmans, 1863.
“History of England from the Fall of Wolsey to the Death of Elizabeth.” London Review, 22, no. 4: (April 1864): 158–200.
        Review of Froude’s two volumes on the reign of Elizabeth; begins with discussion of women in general and queens in particular. Observes that this is primarily a history of the state, with little attention to matters of culture.
“History of the Holy Cross.” Dublin Review, 2, no. 4: (April 1864): 497–99.
        Discusses the existence of original copies of this facsimile of a 15th century work (first printed by J. Veldener), and reprinted copies that exist. Discusses the content of the book and notes that it is of antiquarian and religious interest. Text and engravings by J. P. Berjeau. Publisher is Stewart, 1863.
“Mr. Gardiner’s History of James I.” Fraser’s Magazine, 69, no. 412: (April 1864): 419–34.
        Refers to Samuel Rawson Gardiner’s earlier discovery of manuscript materials and edition prepared for the Camden Society. Finds considerable fault with the author’s interpretations. Published in 2 volumes by Hurst & Blackett.
Russell, Charles William.“Froude’s History of England-Mary Stuart (Vols 1 & 2).” Dublin Review, 3, no. 5: (July 1864): 97–131.
        Examines Froude’s book in detail , stating that Froude is not a good historian, being recklessly contemptuous and virulent in his tone, and also arrogant. Publisher is Longman. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Ottley, Henry.“Notes on Diplomacy and Diplomatic History,.” Fraser’s Magazine, 70, no. 416: (August 1864): [135]-157.
        First of a 4-part article, expounding on the role of diplomacy in international relations with both contemporary and historical examples. Continued in September and December 1864.  (Attribution: Wellesley Index).
Ottley, Henry.“Notes on Diplomacy and Diplomatic History.” Fraser’s Magazine, 70, no. 417: (September 1864): 331–50.
        Continuation of the 4-part article initiated in August 1864 issue.
“Lectures on Some Subjects of Modern History and Biography.” Dublin Review, 3, no. 6: (October 1864): 497–98.
        J. B. Robertson’s lecture topics include the Restoration and Freemasonry; the history is assessed as worthy of the respected reputation of the author. Publisher is Kelly, of Dublin.
Ottley, Henry.“Notes on Diplomacy and Diplomatic History.” Fraser’s Magazine, 70, no. 418: (October 1864): 482–505.
        Third part of article initiated in the August issue.
“Revolutions in English History.” London Review, 23, no. 45: (October 1864): 250–51.
        Brief notice of Volume III of Robert Vaughn’s work, of which the subject is ‘Revolutions in Government’, i.e. the events of the 17th-century struggle between crown and Parliament and the events of 1688.
Jeffrey, Francis.“Surnames, in Relation to the History of Society.” Dublin Review, 3, no. 6: (October 1864): 344–71.
        Claims that this book by Robert Ferguson is interesting and full of information; it carefully proves its points. But although the author is well acquainted with his material, he ignores some essential topics (such as the Celts and their connection to Ireland). Publisher is Routledge and Co., 1858. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Stephen, James Fitzjames (Sir).“Kaye’s History of the Indian Mutiny (Vol. 1).” Fraser’s Magazine, 70, no. 420: (December 1864): 757–74.
        Although lengthy, John William Kaye’s work is described as attractive and ‘not tedious’; title is A History of the Sepoy War in India 1857-1858 (first of an anticipated 3 vol., published Allen & Co, 1864) {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Ottley, Henry.“Notes on Diplomacy and Diplomatic History.” Fraser’s Magazine, 70, no. 420: (December 1864): 781–97.
        Conclusion of 4-part article initiated in August 1864 issue.
Froude, James Anthony.“How Ireland Was Governed in the Sixteenth Century.” Fraser’s Magazine, VOLUME 71, MARCH 1865: (March 1865): 312–15.
        Article about a 1569 letter, written by Sir Henry Sidney, which documented atrocities in Irish uprisings against English rule.  (Attribution: Wellesley Index).
Davies, James.“An Essay on the History of the English Government and Constitution, from the Reign of Henry VII.” Quarterly, 117, no. 234: (April 1865): 540–74.
        This is a new edition (with new preface) of Russell’s youthful work on the British Constitution, issued ‘on the eve of a dissolution’. Reviewer feels the time has not yet come for a history of the 1832 Reform crisis, but admits that some such manifesto has been needed. Reviewed: Russell, John (Earl Russell). An Essay on the History of the English Government and Constitution, from the Reign of Henry VII. 1865. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Russell, Charles William.“Theiner’s Materials of Irish History.” Dublin Review, 4, no. 8: (April 1865): 372–95.
        Discusses the content of this book edited by Augustus Theiner (Vetera Monumenta Hibernorum et Scotorum illstrantia, que ex Vaticani, Neapolis ae Florentice Tabulariis deprempsit et Ordine Chronologico disposuit). States that the sources provided offer little information on general history and that overall the book will be more useful as a supplement than a source of information in its own right. Book published 1864. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“THE HISTORY OF WOOD-ENGRAVING.” Chambers’s, 0, no. 73: (20 May 1865): 309–13.
        History of the art from ancient Egyptian times to the modern era in various countries; examines several significant artists.
Merivale, Herman.“History of Frederic the Second of Prussia, Called Frederic the Great.” Quarterly, 118, no. 235: (July 1865): 225–54.
        Comments on the extensive criticism (both positive and negative) of earlier volumes, concluding that ‘we shall not profane the great work before us by the slight handling of an ordinary review.’ Reviewed: Carlyle, Thomas. History of Frederic the Second of Prussia, called Frederic the Great. Vol. V & VI. 1825. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“Proposed Manual of English History.” Dublin Review, 5, no. 9: (July 1865): 173–85.
        Discusses the teaching of history and the usefulness and content of Lingard’s, Flanagan’s and other works for classroom use.
“The Claims of the Anglican Establishment to Be the Representative of the Primitive Church Tested by the History and Acts of the Council of Ephesus.” Dublin Review, 5, no. 9: (July 1865): 264–65.
        States that the content of this book by the Rev. T. Harper is full of subversive material and that the arguments are inconclusive. Publisher is Rockcliff, of Liverpool.
Stott, George.“History of the Sect of Maharajahs Or Vallabhacharyans in Western India.” Fortnightly Review, 2, no. 0: (15 August 1865): 125–26.
        Publisher is Trubner; author is Mulji Karsandas.
Lancaster, Henry Hill.“History of Friedrich II of Prussia, Called Frederick the Great.” North British, 43, no. 85: (September 1865): 79–126.
        Reviewer focuses mostly on Thomas Carlyle’s style, approach, and presentation, rather than the content of the work. States that this book is beautiful, commanding, well-researched, and clearly and simply written. Although reviewer does point out that in this work Carlyle has lost some of the skills for which his work was admired in the past, including tolerance and sympathy for his characters. Publisher is Chapman and Hall, 1864. Attribution Wellesley Index.
Seebohm, F.“THE BLACK DEATH, AND ITS PLACE IN ENGLISH HISTORY (1).” Fortnightly Review, 1, no. 0: (15 September 1865): 149–60.
        Seebohm discusses evidence that demonstrates a very large proportion of the people of England died of the plague in 1348-9. As well, he answers questions concerning how the English peasantry became detached from the land and what caused the conditions of England’s towns and cities to worsen. Immigration is also mentioned as a factor affecting England’s population. This article demonstrates that the population of England was much larger before the plague, than was originally assumed.
Seebohm, F.“THE BLACK DEATH, AND ITS PLACE IN ENGLISH HISTORY (2).” Fortnightly Review, 2, no. 0: (15 September 1865): 268–79.
        Seebohm continues his article with a discussion of how the extreme depopulation caused by the Plague in the fourteenth century affected the relationship between land and labour. He states that a sudden fall in the market value of land and the sudden rise in the market value of labour were inevitable. This article also states that it was not until the sixteenth century that the value of land began to rise again. With this rise in land value also came a rise in the value of house property. Seehbohm also mentions the effect that war had on the population.
Jewitt, Llewellyn.“The Wedgwoods: Being a Life of Josiah Wedgwood; with Notices of His Works and Their Productions, Memoirs of the Wedgwood and Other Families, and a History of the Early Potteries of Staffordshire.” Fortnightly Review, 2, no. 0: (15 October 1865): 637–38.
        A ‘sympathising and intelligent appreciation’, including historic survey of Staffordshire potteries back to the Celtic period.
Godkin, G. S.“History of the Viceroys of Ireland, with Notices of the Castle of Dublin and Its Chief Occupants in Former Times.” Fortnightly Review, 3, no. 14: (December 1865): 251–53.
        States this work is accurate, reliable, useful, and valuable; author is J.T. Gilbert; publisher is James Duffy.
“THE HISTORY OF THE BRITISH EMPIRE IN INDIA, FROM THE APPOINTMENT OF LORD HARDINGE TO THE POLITICAL EXTINCTION OF THE EAST INDIA COMPANY, 1844 to 1862.” Fortnightly Review, 5, no. 25: (1866): 124–26.
        Author is Lionel James Trotter, who recognizes ‘it is time we did something more than take a merely “general interest” in the record of deeds of arms, and in sensation sketches of savage tribes, gorgeous native courts, strange manners, stranger rites, and all the “contrasts” in which most Indian historians have delighted.’
“A History of the City of Rome; Its Structures and Monuments, from Its Foundation to the End of the Middle Ages.” Dublin Review, 6, no. 11: (January 1866): 292–93.
        Claims that this book by Thomas Dyer is learned, elaborate, valuable, and the introduction is able and interesting. Also states that overall this work will be valuable to students of antiquities and contains the useful addition of well done maps, indices, notes, and references. Publisher is Longman.
“The Five Great Monarchies of the Ancient Eastern World; or, the History, Geography, and Antiquities of Chaldaea, Assyria, Babylon, Media, and Persia.” Dublin Review, 6, no. 11: (January 1866): 293–94.
        States that George Rawlinson’s book makes a dry and heavy topic attractive and interesting with his style and presentation.
Barham, Francis.“History of Hebrew Philology.” Fortnightly Review, 3, no. 17: (15 January 1866): 566–74.
        Hebrew Philology is ‘illustrated by the chronological succession of its chief grammars and dictionaries’ (566). This article provides a brief account of the most distinguished works, including those of Zohar, Akiba and Origen. Issues of concern include how the letters of the Hebrew alphabet have their own significance and the distinct nature of the Hebrew language. Following the topic of grammar, is a second branch of Hebrew Philology called Hebrew Lexicography. The coverage is the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.
Browning, Oscar.“Trollope’s History of Florence.” Fortnightly Review, 4, no. 19: (15 February 1866): 70–86.
        The review is primarily an essay in praise of Florence. Browning engages with T. Augustus Trollope’s analysis in a number of places but priases his ‘pure and lucid’ style, which, unlike that of his novels, is not dull.
Fagan, H. S.“A Constitutional History of the British Empire; from the Accession of Charles I. to the Restoration:” Fortnightly Review, 4, no. 21: (15 March 1866): 377–81.
        Author is George Brodie, a ‘nondescript’ historian who ‘tears the soft veil of distance off the middle ages, and displays feudal times in even more than their natural ugliness.’ So fond are English readers of ‘this kind of history’, however, ‘that a few months “dryasdust” research will give any man a cheap reputaton as a historian.’
Freeman, Edward Augustus.“THE MYTHICAL AND ROMANTIC ELEMENTS IN EARLY ENGLISH HISTORY.” Fortnightly Review, 4, no. 24: (May 1866): 641–68.
        Freeman separates English history into four categories: historical, romantic, traditional and mythical. ‘Simple historic truth’ and ‘the historic mind’ must struggle against myth, legend, and tradition.
“Lecky’s History of Rationalism.” Dublin Review, 7, no. 13: (July 1866): 51–79.
        Discusses the views and content of Lecky’s book and states that the author pays little attention to evidence or to arguments or lines of argument; characterizes the work as very one-sided. Publisher is Longman.
Dennis, John.“Researches into the History of the British Dog.” Fortnightly Review, 5, no. 30: (August 1866): 768.
        The book is unsatisfactory -- has no plan, but rather ‘is a confused mass of details’; however many of the illustrations are excellent. Author is George R. Jesse; publisher is Robert Hardwicke.
Rose, Henry John.“Stanley’s Jewish History.” Fraser’s Magazine, 74, no. 440: (August 1866): [135]-158.
        Review of Arthur Penrhyn Stanley’s Lectures of the History of the Jewish Church )Part I, 2nd ed. 1863 and Part II 1865) expresses concern about the effect of Biblical scholarship upon faith and belief{attribution Wellesley Index}.
Bell, Robert.“The History of Signboards.” Fortnightly Review, 6, no. 33: (15 September 1866): 376–80.
        An episode in the history of advertising. Authors are Jacob Larwood & John Camden Hotten; publisher is Hotten.
Elwin, Whitwell.“A History of Architecture in All Countries from the Earliest Times to the Present Day.” Quarterly, 120, no. 240: (October 1866): 425–61.
        Comments that this book (the first of three volumes) is ‘the first in which the subject has been properly treated.’ Reviewed: Fergusson, James. A History of Architecture in all Countries from the earliest Times to the present Day. 1865.{attribution Wellesley Index}.
Molesworth, W. N.“HISTORY OF THE REFORM QUESTION FROM 1832 TO 1848.” Fortnightly Review, 7, no. 4: (April 1867): 389–409.
        Molesworth discusses the various events involved in the Chartist movement and its successors. He discusses the actions of the Working Men’s Association, which advocated for the social improvement of the working class. The obstacles of the Chartists and how they overcame these problems is also discussed. Continued in June 1867 issue, pp 743-747.
“Nisard’s History of French Literature, 3rd Ed.” Fraser’s Magazine, 75, no. 448: (April 1867): 435–47.
        Author is Désiré Nisard; title is Histoire de la Litterature francaise.
Howson, J. S.“The History and Antiquities of the Counties of Westmorland and Cumberland.” Quarterly, 122, no. 244: (April 1867): 347–81.
        Covers 10 works on the localities -- of which only a couple of small handbooks are very recent. In the reviewer’s (Howson’s) opinion the two counties should not be considered separately. Reviewed: Nicholson, J.N & Richard Burn. The History and Antiquities of the Counties of Westmorland and Cumberland. 1777. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Freeman, Edward Augustus.“The Relations between the Crowns of England and Scotland.” Fortnightly Review, VOLUME 7 O.S., 1 N.S., JUNE 1867: (June 1867): 697–714.
        Freeman observes that ‘the popular and romantic English mind’ likes to take the Scottish side in controversy, and refers to his own debate with Robertson, outlined in History of the Norman Conquest.
Herbert, H. H. M.“The History of the Norman Conquest of England, Its Causes and Its Results.” Quarterly, 123, no. 245: (July 1867): 144–73.
        Praise for Freeman’s ‘fairness and honesty of purpose’, despite ‘obvious prepossessions on particular subjects’ (notably spelling). Reviewed: Freeman, Edward A. The History of the Norman Conquest of England, its Causes and its Results. Vol. I. 1867. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“A BIOGRAPHY OF OLIVER CROMWELL.” Boy’s Own Magazine, 1 July 1867
        The author reviews thirty-six essays written about Oliver Cromwell by readers ages twelve to eighteen.  The reviewers provide a summary and analysis of each submission and also a ranking.
Morley, John.“MR. FROUDE ON THE SCIENCE OF HISTORY.” Fortnightly Review, 2, no. 8: (August 1867): 226–37.
        Article is signed ‘Editor’. The author remarks on the antipathy aroused by attempts to make history a science, excoriating in particular a recent publication of Froude’s lecture on this subject. Attribution Wellesley Index.
Giffen, Robert.“Lives of Indian Officers: Illustrative of the History of the Civil and Military Services of India.” Fortnightly Review, 2, no. 9: (September 1867): 376.
        One of the objects of this book is ‘to popularise Indian history and the Indian service by means of specimen biographies.’ Author is John William Kaye, whose main purpose is ‘that of interesting a new generation of Englishmen in an Indian career.’ Attribution Wellesley Index.
Morley, John.“Three English Statesmen: A Course of Lectures on the Political History of England.” Fortnightly Review, 2, no. 9: (September 1867): 373–76.
        Author is Goldwin Smith, whose subjects are Py, Cromwell and the second Pitt. He uses history to critique contemporary politics. Attribution Wellesley Index.
Macdonell, James.“History of Civilisation in England.” North British, 47, no. 94: (December 1867): 359–403.
        This review of H. T. Buckle’s most recent volume focuses on the concepts of morality and ethics in law, religion, and society by looking at the author’s theories and ideas and discussing the thoughts of other scholars, often picking apart Buckle’s theories and calling them ‘fruitless speculation.’ Publisher is Longman. Attribution Wellesley Index.
Conway, Moncure D.“The History of Israel to the Death of Moses.” Fortnightly Review, 2, no. 12: (December 1867): 732–34.
        Praise for the ‘genius and scholarship’ of Heinrich Ewald; translator is Russell Martineau. Published by Longman.
Froude, James Anthony.“Condition and Prospects of Protestantism.” Fraser’s Magazine, VOLUME 77, JANUARY 1868: (January 1868): 56–70.
        Begins with contemporary evangelical politics and ends with historical disquisition. (Attribution: Wellesley Index).
Kaye, J. W.“History of the French in India.” Fortnightly Review, 3, no. 14: (February 1868): 222–25.
        The review regards British management of India as superior to French efforts. Book is by Major G. B. Malleson.
Morley, John.“The History of the French Revolution.” Fortnightly Review, 3, no. 15: (March 1868): 345–48.
        Praise for Heinrich von Sybel’s even-handed treatment of the subject; translator is Walter C. Perry. Signed ‘Editor’.
Freeman, Edward Augustus.“Mr. Pearson’s Early and Middle Ages of England.” Fortnightly Review, VOLUME 9 O.S., 3 N.S., APRIL 1868: (April 1868): 397–404.
        Review of Charles H. Pearson’s book. Freeman is scathing about the first volume, a revision of an immature work and still rife with error. Second volume is more knowledgeable but still marred by author’s scientific approach to history.
“The Massacre of S. Bartholomew, Preceded by a History of the Religious Wars in the Reign of Charles IX.” Dublin Review, 10, no. 20: (April 1868): 559–62.
        Briefly examines the content and views expressed in this book and states that it is accurate but that the author, Henry White is sometimes misled by his ‘anti-catholic prejudice.’ Publisher is John Murray.
Kirkus, William.“The History of the Kings of Rome.” Fortnightly Review, 3, no. 18: (June 1868): 718–20.
        Author is Thomas Henry Dyer.
“THE HISTORY OF ENGLAND FROM A NEW POINT OF VIEW.” Boy’s Own Magazine, 1 June 1868
        A short and comical history of England. The author tells of the series of invasions of Britain by the Romans, the Picts, the Scots, the Germans, Danes, and Normans. He discusses various wars with France, Henry VIII’s transformation of the country’s religion, the relationship with Scotland, the Stuarts and the Hanoverians.
Stigand, William.“History of Lace.” Quarterly, 125, no. 249: (July 1868): 166–88.
        Praise and admiration. for ‘a worthy historian’ of ‘this graceful ornament of civilization’. Reviewed: Palliser, Mrs. (Fanny) Bury. History of Lace. 1865. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Fiske, John.“THE LAWS OF HISTORY.” Fortnightly Review, 4, no. 21: (September 1868): 277–99.
        Fiske discusses the doctrine of free-will and volition and considers the connection between action and motive. Fiske also mentions the teleological doctrine, while pointing out its disadvantages.
“History of Philosophy from Thales to Comte.” Dublin Review, 11, no. 22: (October 1868): 556–58.
        States that George Henry’ Lewes’s book focuses on ancient and modern philosophy. The work shows great study and thought and will be useful to any student who is already well acquainted with the subject. Publisher is Longman.
Freeman, Edward Augustus.“Kirk’s History of Charles the Bold.” Fortnightly Review, VOLUME 10 O.S., 4 N.S., OCTOBER 1868: (October 1868): 349–68.
        Review of a 3-volume work by John Foster Kirk, published by Murray. The subject is described as attractive and important, but the writing is sometimes ‘wild’ or ‘extravagant.’ Freeman refers to his own comments on the first two volumes in National Review. .
Trollope, Thomas Adolphus.“The Mancinis: An Italian Episode in French History.” Fraser’s Magazine, 78, no. 467: (November 1868): 603–22.
        Focuses on the 17th century Mancini family, who came from Italy and lived in France. Focuses mainly on Cardinal Mazarin (Giulio Mazarino, 1602-1661) the chief minister of France and his beautiful and famous nieces. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Colvin, Sidney.“History of Art.” Fortnightly Review, 4, no. 24: (December 1868): 697–99.
        Author is Dr. Wilhelm Lubke; translator is F.E. Bunnett.
Colvin, Sidney.“Italian Sculptors: Being a History of Sculpture in Northern, Southern, and Eastern Italy.” Fortnightly Review, 5, no. 25: (January 1869): 123–25.
        Author is Charles Perkins.
“A HEAD FOR A HEAD; OR, FLODDEN FIELD: ITS HEROES AND SURVIVORS.” Boy’s Own Magazine, 1 January 1869
        A semi-fictional account of the Battle of Flodden in 1513 , of which the first eight chapters were written by J.G. Edgar before he died. Edgar begins by describing Edinburgh and the political climate of Europe before the battle. The historical relationships between the Kings of Scotland, England, and France are discussed.
“History of England from the Earliest to the Present Time.” Fortnightly Review, 5, no. 28: (April 1869): 504.
        Sir Edward Creasy’s book is judged to be a good addition to the many texts books for students about the topic, but not a useful contribution to history.
“History of the Life and Times of Edward the Third.” Dublin Review, 12, no. 24: (April 1869): 506–10.
        Briefly examines the content of William Longman’s book and offers several excerpts. Remarks that this work is valuable and acquaints the reader well with the king; the best part of the work is its discussion of the effects of the Black Death and the institution of chivalry. Reviewer notes that Longman offers a very just and impartial portrait of this historic period and its king. Publisher is Longman.
Stigand, William.“The Massacre of St. Bartholomew, Preceded by a History of the Religious Wars in the Reign of Charles IX.” Quarterly, 126, no. 252: (April 1869): 499–534.
        Covers several works on Protestantism in France. Reviewed: White, Henry. The Massacre of St. Bartholomew, preceded by a History of the Religious Wars in the Reign of Charles IX. 1868. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
“A History of Chemical Theory from the Age of Lavoisier to the Present Time.” Fortnightly Review, 5, no. 29: (May 1869): 631.
        Author is A. A. Wurtz; translator is Henry Watts.
Freeman, Edward Augustus.“Mr. Longman’s Life and Times of Edward The Third.” Fortnightly Review, VOLUME 11 O.S., 5 N.S., MAY 1869: (May 1869): 586–96.
        Review of a 2-volume work by William Longman, who is described as having done quite well for an author who is not a lifelong student of history.
“HISTORY VIA POETRY.” Chambers’s, 0, no. 280: (1 May 1869): 294–98.
        First part of an article reviewing and remarking on Matthew Browne’s book, Chaucer’s England . Here the focus is on learning history through Chaucer’s male characters. The second part, published on 8 May 1869, discusses the female characters.
Merivale, Charles.“History of European Morals from Augustus to Charlemagne.” North British, 50, no. 100: (July 1869): 381–405.
        Examines W.E.H. Lecky’s history of morals, noting that Lecky’s biggest problem is his inability to distinguish between history and philosophy; also notes the lack of connection between parallel concepts throughout the work. Attribution Wellesley Index.
Stephen, Leslie.“Mr. Lecky’s History of European Morals.” Fraser’s Magazine, 80, no. 477: (September 1869): [273]-284.
        This review of W.E.H. Lecky’s History of European Morals from Augustus to Charlemagne (published Longman, 1869) compares the author’s views to those of J. S. Mill {attribution Wellesley Index}.
BOASE, C. W.“The History of the Norman Conquest of England, Its Causes and Its Results, by E.A. Freeman.” Academy, no. 1: (9 October 1869): 20–21.
        Boase states that this 3rd volume provides an excellent critical account of the event and suggests the only defect of the book is that less important parts are given at too great length. He observes in passing that ‘In modern Europe the History of England alone presents a great and united epic subject second, if second, only to that of Rome.’ Publisher is OUP.
“Old English History for Children.” Fortnightly Review, 6, no. 35: (November 1869): 584.
        E. A. Freeman’s book is described as simple and useful to children; the maps presented are particularly useful.
SACHAU, E.“The History of India, as Told by Its Own Historians, by Sir H.M. Elliot; Edited by Professor John Dowson.” Academy, no. 3: (11 December 1869): 78–79.
        This first review in the Academy covers the second volume of a book that was to have been edited/compiled by Sir. Henry Elliot, but is, instead, described as coming from the late editor’s posthumous papers It consists of biographical notices and translated excerpts from the work of Persian chroniclers. Dowson is praised for making thorough revisions of the material and adding much from his own research. Editor is John Dowson. Publisher is Trubner. See reviews of subsequent volumes in 1873, 1874, 1875, and 1877.
Burrows, Montagu.“History of England, Comprising the Reign of Queen Anne until the Peace of Utrecht.” Quarterly, 129, no. 257: (1870): 1–39.
        Regrets that Macaulay did not live to write the history of the period, but engages with Mahon’s ‘less dazzling’ but ‘most trustworthy’ approach. Reviewed: Earl (Philip Henry) Stanhope. History of England, comprising the Reign of Queen Anne until the Peace of Utrecht. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Bryce, James.“History of European Morals from Augustus to Charlemagne.” Quarterly, 128, no. 255: (January 1870): 49–81.
        Identifies the subject as standing between the history of speculative philosophy and that of politics. The style is ‘easy and agreeable, albeit somewhat feminine’; whereas the author’s mind is quick but too facile in generalization. He lacks, however, ‘the strength and precision of thought, force of imagination, accuracy . . . critical discrimination, [and] sobriety of judgment’ of the true historian. Reviewed: Lecky, W.E.H. History of European Morals from Augustus to Charlemagne. 1869. {attribution Wellesley Index}.
Sigerson, George.“History of Irish Land Tenures.” North British, 51, no. 102: (January 1870): 435–77.
        This article examines Irish Land tenures and the corresponding bills and legislation from the 11th to the early 19th century. Examines the interaction between the British and the Irish, the legal and social issues that arose throughout this history, and how political, religious and social issues influenced land reforms and tenure. Attribution Wellesley Index.
“The New School History of England, from Early Writers and National Records.” Dublin Review, 14, no. 27: (January 1870): 289–91.
        States that, despite Protestant authorship, this book is fair to Catholics and truthful about Mary I and other controversial subjects; it treats political and historical facts and questions with care. However, states that the style is careless and that the brevity of his discussion of topics did not offer the full view that lengthier history works do. Publisher is James Parker and Co. Author also wrote The Annals of England (viz William Edward Flaherty).
BOASE, C. W.“History of England from the Fall of Wolsey to the Defeat of the Spanish Armada, by James Anthony Froude.” Academy, no. 4: (8 January 1870): 108–10.
        Review of the final volumes, 6 and 7. Praises the author for his clear and easy style that allows the reader to focus the attention on the moving and living characters of the story.
BOASE, C. W.“History of the Norman Kings of England, by Thomas Cobbe.” Academy, no. 5: (12 February 1870): 134–35.
        The book is drawn from a new collection of the contemporary chronicles (published by Longman). The reviewer thinks that the author’s view of the four Norman reigns is imperfect but that he has succeeded in giving freshness to the narrative by telling the tale as it was told by the men of that early age.
SYMONDS, J. A.“The History of the Life of Albrecht Durer, by Mrs. Charles Heaton.” Academy, no. 5: (12 February 1870): 119–20.
        Review compares Mary Margaret Heaton’s work (published by Macmillan) with that of William B. Scott (Longman). Little is known about the artist, and German biographers have speculated too much. The woman author’s work is judged talkative and picturesque; the man’s has no literary fluency [but] greater gravity and more reliability.
Cox, George William.“The History of the Norman Conquest of England.” Fortnightly Review, 7, no. 39: (March 1870): 318–32.
        Review of the first three volumes of Edward A. Freeman’s book, published by the Clarendon Press, Oxford. Praises the author’s patience, vast research and vivid narrative, but Cox allies himself with ‘the Edinburgh reviewer’ in pointing out some inadequacies.
BOASE, C. W.“History of Sicily In Antiquity, by Ad. Holm.” Academy, no. 6: (12 March 1870): 162.
        Reviewer of this German-language works states that the author follows the view of Curtius and Grote and devotes most of the book to a political and geographical history. The book’s strengths are its chapters on the poetry and culture of the island, but the author does not devote enough space to these subjects.